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A wiper motor is normally powered by a car battery, right? If you want to use it with a prop, does that mean you have to connect it to a battery? Can it run on household current? Thanks.
 

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A wiper motor is normally powered by a car battery, right? If you want to use it with a prop, does that mean you have to connect it to a battery? Can it run on household current? Thanks.
You need a 12 volt AC to DC converter which are very, very common. The 12VCD 5amp power bricks that you use with laptops and game systems work perfectly and are readily available almost everywhere cheap.
 

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I use an old computer power supply and a PWM controller. it has +- 12V and can handle the current needed to run it and it also has +-5 volts for all the other goodies.
 

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Here is a question for you.....OK so its possible to go from a car battery to House current.
But is it possible to go from a House current prop ( 120 Volt ) and convert it to using a car battery ( 12 Volt ).
I am going to have our Hearse parked in front of our home, and I am wanting to run a Fog Machine inside the Hearse, but would like to run it on 12Volt, as opposed to using its required 120 Volt supply.
How can I do this???
 

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Here is a question for you.....OK so its possible to go from a car battery to House current.
But is it possible to go from a House current prop ( 120 Volt ) and convert it to using a car battery ( 12 Volt ).
I am going to have our Hearse parked in front of our home, and I am wanting to run a Fog Machine inside the Hearse, but would like to run it on 12Volt, as opposed to using its required 120 Volt supply.
How can I do this???
Easy, a power inverter. Just make sure you get one that has more than the required wattage your device needs. Here's one.
https://m.harborfreight.com/750-watt-continuous-1500-watt-peak-power-inverter-66817.html
 

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my first thought was if he is asking can he hook a wiper motor directly to a 120VAC outlet maybe he should not be playing with electricity. If you mean can you run it off a power supply the answer is yes, BUT. DC power loses amperage rapidly the further the power source is from the load. so you need to consider how hard the wiper motor will be working and use a larger diameter wire if you are running it any distance. If you use a small 5 amp power supply like would be used to power say a cell phone then your power supply is also a fuseable link if you put it on a heavy load. they are not build to run at total capacity for extended periods and will melt down. a car battery placed close to the motor and run say a 14 or 16 gauge wire should last for the season, depending on the battery capacity, is it isolated from the ground, and condition of the cells. you might want to look for a small 12VDC alarm panel battery like used in deer feeders, alarm panels and other services like that. they are cheaper, smaller and weight a lot less than even a small car battery. If you want to use an AC power supply make sure it has both a variable output for voltage and amperage. if it has a high enough range on the amperage you can run several wiper motors on it as long as they are not too far away and you are not running the motors under a heavy load. what I would suggest is set it all up at the distance you want it to run, get it running and using a good voltmeter measure the voltage across the two leads at the wiper motor at it's heaviest load. If you voltage is off more than half a volt you need more power. if you are running a 5 amp load on 26 gauge wire for fifty foot and your wiper motor is whining and barely moving you need a much larger gauge wire. I used to use a power wheel to tell me what sized wire I needed to run -48VDC over some distance for a given amperage. you won't go wrong using a large wire which offers less resistance which means less load on your battery or power supply. but don't go overboard on wire size, you don't need welding cable sized wire for a wiper motor. things to remember distance between your power source and load is not your friend, cheap power supplies are not meant to be run at max load for extended periods, they melt eventually, if your power leads become soft and tacky you need a heavier gauge wire. trial and error will let you know when you miscalculate and you are watching the magic blue smoke come out of your components, usually this happens at the worse possible time. the most important thing I can tell you is keep your fingers out of the circuitry unless you know what you are doing. A gold wedding ring placed between high voltage and a ground only glows for a few thousands of a second before sending gold thru out the circuit and the wearer to the hospital to see if they can save the finger. Cleaning the gold off the components is a pain in the *ss but not nearly as painful as the hand on that guy suffered. take off all your jewelry while working on electric components, that includes watches and dangling necklaces that could drop down and short out, you can weld for a short time with just a 12VDC battery.
 

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As others have said, you can't plug a wiper motor directly into alternating current as they are direct current devices. You can buy a 12 volt power supply that does plug into a household outlet and then supplies 12 volts to the motor. You also need to determine how many amps you will need as 12 volt adapters supply anywhere from 1 to 5 or more amps. There is also the issue of how fast the motor turns as noted by others as well. You often need a slower motion than is inherent in the motor if simply plugged directly into a 12 volt power supply. PWM (pulse width modulation) controllers are available and allow you to adjust the speed of the motor, but they also reduce the power and, therefore, it depends on the application and how much resistance your prop provides how well they will work for you. Good luck.
 

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PWM (pulse width modulation) controllers are available and allow you to adjust the speed of the motor, but they also reduce the power and, therefore, it depends on the application and how much resistance your prop provides how well they will work for you.
Ahhh, but that's the big advantage with PWM, you don't lose any torque from the motor. Simply reducing the voltage to slow the motor does result in loss of torque but PWM does not.
 
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