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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone. pretty new to the forums. I've been stalking for a little while and have been impressed with the ideas and execution of everyone here.

here at home i dont know anyone (including my wife who thinks i'm crazy) thats into doing a haunt so i want to so something for all the kids and get everyone into it. i've been building up a little bit over the last few years but want to get more serious.

anyway, since i dont know anyone else who is into this i dont have anywhere else to turn to for help. I have built a cauldron creep and am trying to figure out how to wire my motor for the cauldron. the motor i have is from a 2004 ford focus and i would like to wire it to an old computer power supply i have. the problem is i have very little knowlege on the matter. can anyone provide me with a very detailed step by step (for dummies...really dumb dummies) explanation? i imagine it is a matter of just connecting a few correct wires but every guide i find out there is too complicated for me. i also have been unable to find a wire diagram. is it just a matter of attaching ground to ground and if i find the slow speed wire to a +5v wire from the power supply? there has to be more to it than that right...?

i'm obviously clueless and have been frustrated with what i have found for explanations. any help anyone could bring themselves to provide would be much appreciated. thanks!
 

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I've never worked with a Ford Focus wiper motor, but every motor I've ever pulled from the junk yard had a circuit assembly that I had to remove the get to the 3 or 4 contacts for powering the motor. The wiring harness is connected to the circuit card assembly, the circuit card assembly is connected to the power contacts.

It may be a better option to just bite the bullet and shell out the $25 for a wiper motor from Fright Props, Monster Guts, or some other vendor that will actually have information online on how to hook up their motors.

Wiper motors generally run on 12vdc. I haven't built a cauldron creep yet, but I'd imagine that people would use 5vdc to get a slower rotation out of it. You could also use a "motor controller", also available from the above parts suppliers to use 12vdc.

Is your computer power supply already hacked and useable? There are a couple of other things that need to be done with it other than just pulling it from the computer. I think that Halstaff, from this and other forums, has devised a little circuit board that you can plug your computer power supply into to turn it in to an external power supply to provide 3vdc, 12vdc, 5vdc, and (I think) -5vdc.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i didnt realize you had to do anything additional than to just attached the wires to the power supply....that is unfortunate. yea maybe i'll have to find the money...though the beauty of the project was that it was being done at little cost since i had that motor and a barrel for a cauldron and the pvc is very cheap. thanks for the response.

if anyone else has a fast hack thats simple enough please let me know.

i suppose that would be too good to be true haha
 

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The problem with wiper motors from junk yards is every manufacturer has a different wiring scheme and different wiring colors.. so it's not always easy to find the right ones. Usually experimenting with a 9 volt battery will do the trick.

One thing to remember is the actual metal body of the motor is one of your wires.. .typically the negative (-) side. One of the other wires will be your slow wire, one will be fast. Others are usually reserved for the park feature (I won't go into that here).

That's why I use a battery to start. Connect the negative side of the battery to a wire attached to the body of the motor (there are usually a few screws that you can loosen one of and attach a wire to it). Then, you can quick touch the positive side of the battery to the other wires to figure out which is which. I use a battery, since if you short it out it won't spark like crazy. It might heat up a little, however.. .that's normal. Once you've found the slow speed wire, you can connect 12 volts from a PC power supply (yellow is your 12 volts, black is the negative). I have used 5 volts (red, by the way) to get a very slow rotation for our ship's wheel.
 

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Can you provide a picture of the motor? A very detailed picture ,showing the plug for the harness and supplying the identification of the pin numbers? I have a Ford wiring manual from Ford that I might be able to decipher the pins and help to get you going. The problem with the motor you have is there is a bunch of electronics in it that really are not necessary for your use. That can be bypassed but it's not always easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The problem with wiper motors from junk yards is every manufacturer has a different wiring scheme and different wiring colors.. so it's not always easy to find the right ones. Usually experimenting with a 9 volt battery will do the trick.

One thing to remember is the actual metal body of the motor is one of your wires.. .typically the negative (-) side. One of the other wires will be your slow wire, one will be fast. Others are usually reserved for the park feature (I won't go into that here).

That's why I use a battery to start. Connect the negative side of the battery to a wire attached to the body of the motor (there are usually a few screws that you can loosen one of and attach a wire to it). Then, you can quick touch the positive side of the battery to the other wires to figure out which is which. I use a battery, since if you short it out it won't spark like crazy. It might heat up a little, however.. .that's normal. Once you've found the slow speed wire, you can connect 12 volts from a PC power supply (yellow is your 12 volts, black is the negative). I have used 5 volts (red, by the way) to get a very slow rotation for our ship's wheel.


wouldnt the black wire be the ground? and therefore go to the negative (-) side?
 

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The black wire is the ground. All of my manuals do not show that motor, I have a 1994 and a 2003 wiring manual. I would just do like Creapy Creations suggested, one of those wires may be for the "Park" position. Hope this helps........
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The black wire is the ground. All of my manuals do not show that motor, I have a 1994 and a 2003 wiring manual. I would just do like Creapy Creations suggested, one of those wires may be for the "Park" position. Hope this helps........

so i am safe using the black wire as a ground? what happens if it is not? i will do that battery trick, sounds easy enough, just want to make sure i'm being safe with the ground wire situation
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As an alternate, do you have an animated rein deer youuld borrow the motor from? They are the simplest 'prop' motor to use, and should be able to drive a cauldren creep.
i might be able to find one soneone else has, but would that even have the torque required to hold and turn the stick?
 

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The blac wire may, in fact, be ground. Some connectors run it out as its own wire, others don't. Just another reason why it can be frustrating at time. But, in general, a solid black wire is ground. That's why I use a battery... no nasty surprises! :)
 

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If you're in doubt the only thing you can do is get a multimeter and ohm the wires out.
 

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so i am safe using the black wire as a ground? what happens if it is not? i will do that battery trick, sounds easy enough, just want to make sure i'm being safe with the ground wire situation
The metal case of the motor should be ground.

You can connect negative to the metal case and positive to the wires, one at a time, to see if you get any movement out of it.

Personally, I would take the black, plastic part off of the motor to expose the contacts beneath it. It looks like there are only a few clips holding it on.
 

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i might be able to find one soneone else has, but would that even have the torque required to hold and turn the stick?
I can't guarantee it without building one myself but it appears the only torque is what it takes to turn the stir stick. The lever holding the stick will excert some stress on the motor bearing, but my gues is it would be okay. Wiper motors are STRONG. A wiper motor could probably raise and lower an entire creep, much less make the stir stick go around.

Or use a battery to expriment with the wires as suggested, or Google part numbers from the motor. I found wiring diagrams that way before. We all experiment a little, just be safe.
 

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If it's like most vehicle parts, then the metal case will be grounded as well as have a ground wire. If you have a multimeter just so a quick continuity test to determine which wire is ground. That will be half the battle won right there.
 

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heresjohnny... a wiper motor can DEFINITELY raise and lower an entire creep... our skeleton in a coffin ("Springer")works exactly that way:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
the battery test worked great! the black was ground. i think you should all be rewarded by a game: which wire do you think was high speed and which slow?

THANKS EVERYONE!!
 
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