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Discussion Starter #1
Probably a simple question, but I googled around for a bit and couldn't find a conclusive answer. The title pretty much says it all - I picked up a 12V DC wiper motor today for a prop that I'm planning to build, and the only power supply I could find lying around my house was rated at 16V / 6A. It runs the motor fine for short periods of time. Will powering the wiper motor at a higher voltage than its rated voltage result in any long-term issues?

Thanks for the help.
 

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black light queen
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i don't think that there will be any problems because when the alternator charges your car battery, the voltage is close enough to 16volts that it probably won't make a difference ... so if its raining & your wipers are on, they're seeing the alternator charging voltage as well

depending on the quality of the 16 volt power supply, the voltage may be lower when running a wiper motor with a significant load ... you're more likely to burn up the power supply than the wiper motor

amk
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response. Unfortunately, the motor is not working as expected - it runs for roughly 4-5 rotations and then rapidly slows down and stops. I'll be trying to source a 12V power supply to see if that changes anything for some reason, and, failing that, I'll have to try to get it replaced.
 

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i don't think that there will be any problems because when the alternator charges your car battery, the voltage is close enough to 16volts that it probably won't make a difference ... so if its raining & your wipers are on, they're seeing the alternator charging voltage as well

depending on the quality of the 16 volt power supply, the voltage may be lower when running a wiper motor with a significant load ... you're more likely to burn up the power supply than the wiper motor
amk
A car also has a voltage regulator to keep voltage at the required level, so it is not sending out a voltage level that the system can't handle.
It has less to do with the "quality" of the supply, but more to do with the type (even though some overseas suppliers do have quality concerns).
A regulated power supply will output a steady voltage while an unregulated one could push out voltages twice as high (or low) as intended. The most important thing is to not over voltage your motors.
You could use a 12 volt voltage regulator so that the motor gets the required voltage level instead of the 16v.
You should put a meter up to the supply to see what voltage it really is throwing out.
Obviously, you have seen that the 16v supply doesn't work with the 12v motor.
I would just get the correct power supply, 12v, about 5A, make sure it is a regulated supply.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses! I tested the motor today with a car battery, and it worked fine, so I'll be buying a 12 volt power supply in the very near future. Stupid question, but most switching power supplies are also regulated, correct? Would one like this work well? Thanks again!
 

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BAD INFLUENCE
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Thanks for the responses! I tested the motor today with a car battery, and it worked fine, so I'll be buying a 12 volt power supply in the very near future. Stupid question, but most switching power supplies are also regulated, correct? Would one like this work well? Thanks again!

If you scroll down to the bottom of the page and check out what else is available , there's a 12 v 10 amp power supply for $6.00 more which would ensure there is more than enough to power your wiper motor.
 

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it won't hurt to have the 10A supply, but it is over kill for just one motor. But you will be able to hook up more than one wiper motor to it if you decide to in the future.
Get some crimp spade terminals for the input and output,

xspade-fork-terminals.jpg

and there are tutorials on youtube on how to hook it up if you need help, the one I bought didn't have any directions with it. You will need a plug and wire to supply the 120v to the supply, I used and old computer cable. Good luck!
 

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Jumping in a little late here but it's best to have the prop built that you intend to use this motor before deciding on a power supply. It's entirely possible that a 5V supply would work better than the 12V. Most props need the motor to operate at a slower speed than what 12V will yield. You can always use a PWM speed control to dial in just what you need but like I said, it's best to have the prop built first.
 

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J-Man is correct about the speed problem with power supplies. If you dont like the speed then you need to incorporate a pwm speed controller to give you the desired speed. That is one option. The other option is to get a desktop computer power supply to run your props. Most of my props are ran with desktop power supplies and the reason is this. A PC power supply has 12V, 5V, and 3.3V wires that if connected to a wiper motor will give me a slow (3.3V) medium (5V) and Higher (12V) speed. This allows you to speed up or slow down a prop without having to have a PWM speed controller. Also with a PC power supply I can run multiple props from one unit. For example I have a leering pirate that I connect to the 3.3V wire to give me a slower speed and a FCG connected to the 5V wire on the same supply giving me a medium speed.

Another advantage to this is that with connecting my wiper motors like this I dont lose any torque on the motors because the amps are regulated in the power supply so i am getting essentially the same current through each wire to give approximately the same torque.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I do already have the prop's general framework built. I'm going for a "thrashing" motion, which led me to believe that 12V would be the best choice.

Unfortunately the power supply, when wired up and plugged in, only provides power to the motor for a brief period of time before turning off for a couple of seconds. Probably user error in some way - anyone have any ideas as to what the cause might be? Thanks again.
 

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What power supply are you using? The one from Amazon?

1) make sure it is set to 110vac not 220vac.
2) how did you hook it up? you need a grounded plug (like from an old monitor or computer) and you need to hook up the neutral, the hot and the ground correctly.
3) did you look up a video on youtube to see how to hook it up?
4) See pic of mine below, which is similar, but probably not the same unit. It will give you an idea of how to hook up the wires.
5) See the little "L" and "N" on the plug? Check for continuity between the L and one of the wires, this will tell you which wire is which. In my case, and for most cases, the black will be hot or L, white neutral, or N and green is ground.
6) hook up the wires to the terminal correctly.
7) hook a meter across one V+ terminal and one V- terminal and read the voltage. Adjust it with a small electronics screwdriver until it says 12volts.
8) hook up your motor and pray you didn't fry it and it works now.

2017-08-02 21.04.03.jpg

2017-08-02 21.04.56.jpg

2017-08-02 21.05.01.jpg
 

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I do already have the prop's general framework built. I'm going for a "thrashing" motion, which led me to believe that 12V would be the best choice.

Unfortunately the power supply, when wired up and plugged in, only provides power to the motor for a brief period of time before turning off for a couple of seconds. Probably user error in some way - anyone have any ideas as to what the cause might be? Thanks again.
That's usually an indication that the load is too much for the rated capacity of the power supply. Most power supplies have an internal shut down when there's too much current demand and then it resets causing the problem to repeat over and over.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, I finally got the motor working. I'm not really sure what I did to finally fix it, as it started working intermittently once I cleaned up my wires a bit; later on, after experimenting with a couple of other connections between the motor and the DC wires, it finally ran consistently.

The help I received throughout this thread was invaluable. Thanks, everyone!
 
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