Halloween Forum banner

41 - 50 of 50 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
To each his/her own, you can not get the consistent effect/texture I am trying to achieve by using drylock, there just isn't enough sand in it.
For the cost, I am using left over latex paint I had retinted by myself, I have 2 bags of play sand laying around, more than enough cans of spray adhesive from past holidays and projects, so my cost was nothing. Every square millimeter of my test piece was covered with sand, you can not get that effect with Drylock,
If you could I wouldn't have gone through the trouble. As far as waterproofing the foam is already waterproof, I use exterior grade latex paint. There are many ways to skin a cat, why you gotta dump on mine?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Ah, I was not aware the Drylok had texture to it. That explains the reason as to why so many use it. It's basically the same as me using my gray outdoor primer and then stone texture spray paint...but in one step. Good to know.
Mine has held up fine through all my crazy weather, and I like the look, so I'm still fine with my non-drylok method for now. I would think whatever you can afford or get on sale in either method would be fine.
 

·
The Haunting Girl
Joined
·
853 Posts
There's Original, Extreme, Pro, and Clear. The differences between them are the cost, the texture/colors, amount of water they hold back, and the warranty. The least expensive version of Drylok (original) has the most texture. I've gotten a few gallons off the oops rack as it's the only way I buy any paint. If you get someone paint desk that is actually knows how to tint paint by hand (and is super cool) they can usually remix any color within reason.
Drylok does give a lovely stone look to all of my stones, but right now everything I have is the same shade of gray. The whole yard is looking a little monochromatic. I might re-tint a few gallons myself while I'm still working in Lowe's., otherwise I'll probably just mix some of my other paints in to change it up. I do have to go back and repaint most of my original tombstones anyway since I've improved my technique.
I've considered just buying exterior grade paint to give recreate some of the different types of actual stone you find in most cemeteries. I haven't found the right shade of red-ish brown yet to recreate the stones found in my area. But also, I was told I can't buy any more paint until I use up most of what I have... Which is a lot. I have at least six gallons of Drylok plus a bunch of other gallons of just assorted (mostly exterior) colors. That's what happens when you work in the paint department for a few years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
why dose everyone drylock foambaord it seems like it is an unnecessary y and expensive thing to do, as foam board is already rain resistant
Because not only does it make your project pretty much water proof, (because foam will absorb moisture, and if you've glued layers of board together, that's a very bad thing), drylock also gives you a stone-like texture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts

·
Hauntless
Joined
·
8,332 Posts
Coming late to the party here but I started using Drylok for other reasons. The main one is the grit that it leaves behind. It gives it a perfect stone texture that then shows up terrifically after dry-brushing.

Then I discovered other helpful things about Drylok: my store carried it in gray so it's already the correct color, it hardens up the surface so it makes it a bit more damage resistant and finally, it weatherproofs any decorations that were placed on the stone via monster mud. Oh, and if you have joints and/or seams - it seals those up.
 
41 - 50 of 50 Posts
Top