Halloween Forum banner

21 - 40 of 50 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
I too was sold on the use of drylock after watching The Master (Terra) and all her wonderful videos, but as you can see by my first attempt at a homemade tombstone last year, I was disappointed at the lack if bumps, pimples of supposed concrete. So like the analytical fool that I am I spent a whole afternoon stippling my tombstone with a small artists brush. My question to all the experts on here is
1. Do you thin Drylock down with water
2. Do you use a 3/8'' or 1/2" nap roller, I hate brush marks
3. Is there a way to get better coverage of tombstone with the sand.
Just curious, I am thinking of trying SK Austin's technique of black basecoat, light grey 2nd coat, then some drybrushing with just plain acrylic craft paint.
Any hints, or tips would be appreciated.
stippling1.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Maybe I didn't stir the can of paint up enough, I just couldn't seem to get any consistent coverage of sand, I'd roll some on, and no sand, then a line of sand, no sand. I was a lil disappointed. I'll try mixing it up better this year. I'd hate to think I'd have to add more sand, but if one is truly trying to achieve the effect of concrete, you need a lot of little bumps, eh.
 

·
Kitchen/Green Witch
Joined
·
6,585 Posts
Ah, I was not aware the Drylok had texture to it. That explains the reason as to why so many use it. It's basically the same as me using my gray outdoor primer and then stone texture spray paint...but in one step. Good to know.
Mine has held up fine through all my crazy weather, and I like the look, so I'm still fine with my non-drylok method for now. I would think whatever you can afford or get on sale in either method would be fine.
 

·
Hauntless
Joined
·
8,332 Posts
I too was sold on the use of drylock after watching The Master (Terra) and all her wonderful videos, but as you can see by my first attempt at a homemade tombstone last year, I was disappointed at the lack if bumps, pimples of supposed concrete. So like the analytical fool that I am I spent a whole afternoon stippling my tombstone with a small artists brush. My question to all the experts on here is
1. Do you thin Drylock down with water
2. Do you use a 3/8'' or 1/2" nap roller, I hate brush marks
3. Is there a way to get better coverage of tombstone with the sand.
Just curious, I am thinking of trying SK Austin's technique of black basecoat, light grey 2nd coat, then some drybrushing with just plain acrylic craft paint.
Any hints, or tips would be appreciated.
Hopefully we can find why you aren't getting a lot of sand residue using Drylok. Before use it's thoroughly stirred to get the silica distributed top to bottom in the can. I do not thin it all. It is applied with a 1 1/2 angled brush and I make sure that the final brush strokes are always downward so you start to see the grain of the sand start to develop. The first coat will give you an essence of the stone-look but it's imperative that two coats are applied. The second coat's silica starts getting caught on the first coat's silica and starts building up nicely. After all that is dried and tea-stained - it is critical to drybrush with a much lighter color than the gray base coat. Either very light gray or straight white.

You will see less concrete effect on smooth sections of the foam but it very much shines where the foam was carved up to show wear or crumbling. Here's an example of what I'm talking about:



See the relative smoothness on the face of the stone but where it was damaged it looks more stone-like? Also this shows the downward strokes that is left behind when painting. The photo also shows the impact of tea-staining and drybrushing does to the silica in the paint to make them pop.

Hope that clarifies and helps trouble-shoot.
 

·
Lighthearted Halloween
Joined
·
3,795 Posts
Here are some photos I took of real tombstones (for research)... you can see that gritty worn texture that people are talking about above, that the Drylok is imitating.
(I am referring to the texture of the surface. It will take me years of practice to be able to simulate that cool lichen/moss effect like Terra can.)

IMG_4896.jpg IMG_4899.jpg

Here is a closeup of one of my first foam tombstones. Cool similar texture using the Drylok.

IMG_4882.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,510 Posts
thats what i was thinking get the opps can paint, tint it if you need to, you can buy tint in ozs at some paint stores, and add your additives to it for the texture, very cheap...id prob use a flat exterior paint though..............i get the opps paint to make my monster mud for texture projects all the time

Drylok has Portland cement in it and this gives it the hard coat you are talking about.

If a person had the paint you can get that dryloc feel and hard coat by adding a small amount of Portland cement and texture will a very small amount of sand . If you use a lot of it this would be the cheapest way to go...

getting a gallon of oops paint and a small bag of cement. You would need to play around to find the mixture that works best for you but this way if you need it thick or thin it's up to you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
One of my favorite hobbies, at least when I lived in the Midwest, was wandering through cemeteries taking pictures of the old and interesting stones. I especially love the weathered and badly discolored ones. There's something very beautiful about the natural decomposition of the monuments. The colors and textures are amazing. I literally have hundreds of photographs I've taken of different stones. I really miss the cemeteries. Here in Arizona, they must tie balloons to the dearly departed, and float the out of state, because I've only found one cemetery, and I think it might have a total of ten very boring graves in it. In fact, if it weren't for the sign by the road, you'd drive by just thinking it was a barren empty field. There's not even a single tree or hedge. In the Midwest, we had such beautiful sprawling cemeteries. Here, they don't seem to appreciate the beauty in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
One of my favorite steps in making stones is after I've constructed a nice pristine looking stone, is then ripping it apart. I go around the stone literally tearing chunks out of it with my finger, and making gouges with a knife or screwdriver. Only after I've torn the heck out of it, and made it look like it's rolled down a mountain tied in a bag of cats, do I do my first coat of Drylok. In my opinion, it's the torn up edges, missing chunks, and gouges that makes for a beautifully aged looking stone. All this destruction really comes to life when I walk around doing the dry-brush coats. With every stroke of the dry-brush, all the hours of hard work become apparent, and I feel my excitement growing, as I repeat over and over in my mind, Oh that looks badass!'
 

·
Scaring kids everywhere!
Joined
·
3,702 Posts
I've always used Dryloc, because, for me, it kills four birds with one stone. First off, I have it tinted grey at the hardware store, so there's my color base. Second, it seals the foam board, so there's my base coat if I want to use spray paint. Third, it seals all the little cracks and crevices that water can seep into and erode the adhesives I use. Fourth, it leaves a nice textured stone finish. Lastly, because years ago Terra told me I should use it, and I just love the results. So, there's my reasons.

Yep.... Gotta quote this again. It sums it up perfectly!!! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Hopefully we can find why you aren't getting a lot of sand residue using Drylok. Before use it's thoroughly stirred to get the silica distributed top to bottom in the can. I do not thin it all. It is applied with a 1 1/2 angled brush and I make sure that the final brush strokes are always downward so you start to see the grain of the sand start to develop. The first coat will give you an essence of the stone-look but it's imperative that two coats are applied. The second coat's silica starts getting caught on the first coat's silica and starts building up nicely. After all that is dried and tea-stained - it is critical to drybrush with a much lighter color than the gray base coat. Either very light gray or straight white.

You will see less concrete effect on smooth sections of the foam but it very much shines where the foam was carved up to show wear or crumbling. Here's an example of what I'm talking about:



See the relative smoothness on the face of the stone but where it was damaged it looks more stone-like? Also this shows the downward strokes that is left behind when painting. The photo also shows the impact of tea-staining and drybrushing does to the silica in the paint to make them pop.

Hope that clarifies and helps trouble-shoot.
Always appreciate the input and tips Terra, your tutorials on here inspired me to create my own, thanks for taking the time to reply to my comment. I may just be to anal. I am trying to get bumps and humps of faux concrete on every square inch of my tombstones. The curse of a former graphic artist, nothing is ever perfect in my eyes. I'll practice your techniques on some scrap pieces of foam I have lying around.
 

·
Undertaker
Joined
·
3,173 Posts
I'm prolly the only haunter on the forum who has never used foam board. I got a couple of sheets but haven't used them yet. Maybe next year. ....Definitely will try the drylock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Hopefully we can find why you aren't getting a lot of sand residue using Drylok. Before use it's thoroughly stirred to get the silica distributed top to bottom in the can. I do not thin it all. It is applied with a 1 1/2 angled brush and I make sure that the final brush strokes are always downward so you start to see the grain of the sand start to develop. The first coat will give you an essence of the stone-look but it's imperative that two coats are applied. The second coat's silica starts getting caught on the first coat's silica and starts building up nicely. After all that is dried and tea-stained - it is critical to drybrush with a much lighter color than the gray base coat. Either very light gray or straight white.

You will see less concrete effect on smooth sections of the foam but it very much shines where the foam was carved up to show wear or crumbling. Here's an example of what I'm talking about:



See the relative smoothness on the face of the stone but where it was damaged it looks more stone-like? Also this shows the downward strokes that is left behind when painting. The photo also shows the impact of tea-staining and drybrushing does to the silica in the paint to make them pop.

Hope that clarifies and helps trouble-shoot.
Here is updated pictures of my recent tombstone, with my own recipe of sand/paint, backside came out super, not so lucky on the frontside. I have found the technique to give me the consistent results I was looking for. Just simply basecoat tombstone with paint, sprau adhesive over the stone, sprinkle sand over stone. It is an extra step, but I am tickled to death, LOL, with the results. Thanks again for all your advice. Happy Haunting.
AgathaBackside.jpg
SprayAdhesiveSandTest.jpg [/ATTACH]
Ooops, somehow the pictures didn't load in correct sequence, Sorry :(
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
Yes it is, I wish I woulda went that way, maybe on my next tombstone, :)
I got the idea watching my daughter making a gift for her friend who was turning 21 this week. She took a bottle of wine , sprayed it down with 3M spray adhesive and sprinkled glitter all over the bottle. Then I figured I could do the same with my tombstone and sand, it really works, I did 2 coats of sand, then let it dry and painted right over it. Who'd a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I just don't get the point of painting, then spraying, then sprinkling sand. There is no way you can buy a gallon of paint, the sand, and adhesive that costs less than a gallon of drilok- at least where I live anyway. The result looks exactly the same as when I use the drilok. Also, this is the first year I've used it and it seems to work so much better than plain latex paint.
 
21 - 40 of 50 Posts
Top