Halloween Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Those craft paints you get from places like Wal-Mart are not waterproof are they? What does everyone use for detailed paint on their tombstones?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I use cheap flat latex paint. I paint all the lettering and cracks black. Next I dry brush a medium dark grey. Then I use a spray bottle with white latex paint that is about 20% paint and 80% water and sray the tombstone fron the top and let it run down. Then I do the same with black latex in a spray bottle and concentrate mostly on spraying it very close and lightly where the lettering is or cracks and let that run down. It should look very transparent so the detail is subtle to give it an aged look.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
There seem to be a lot of tombstone posts lately; I just answered this on another post. Use a water based, matte finish, exterior latex paint as the base coat. Some people mix it with sand, sawdust or drywall spackle to achieve a rough texture. Then like FSANDERS suggested use acrylic paints for distressing and aging. This is one I made a few years ago using this paint technique and it has withstood 95+ temperatures and heavy thunderstorms without any damage (ghosts sold separately).

730173
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
There seem to be a lot of tombstone posts lately; I just answered this on another post. Use a water based, matte finish, exterior latex paint as the base coat. Some people mix it with sand, sawdust or drywall spackle to achieve a rough texture. Then like FSANDERS suggested use acrylic paints for distressing and aging. This is one I made a few years ago using this paint technique and it has withstood 95+ temperatures and heavy thunderstorms without any damage (ghosts sold separately).

View attachment 730173
Absolutely love the lettering. The colours, the font, how they stand out, everything.. What colours did you use and how did you manage to get the colours to blend top to bottom? Never seen anything like that but love it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Absolutely love the lettering. The colours, the font, how they stand out, everything.. What colours did you use and how did you manage to get the colours to blend top to bottom? Never seen anything like that but love it!!
Get ready for a lengthy response: I did a post about this particular tombstone a while back. It's very unique in that it has a metal plate embedded in the face of the tombstone that allows magnetic lettering or objects to be applied and removed. Every year I create a new display with a new title so this marquee tombstone allows me to change the lettering to fit the theme. The letters are cut from foamboard, coated in a custom made textured base coat of exterior latex paint (for waterproofing) and then hand painted with acrylic paints. Magnets are embedded in the back of each letter to allow it to “stick” to the tombstone. It took a while to figure how to apply the textured finish to the metal plate while still allowing the magnets to work. I don’t recall the specific colors of the lettering but I believe they are both Apple Barrel acrylic paint 20589E – Harvest Orange and 20760E – Kings Gold. I painted the entire letter with the yellow and then while still wet blended the orange on top. I lined each letter up so I would know how far to paint the blending paint to achieve the effect shown. I was worried about the letters falling-off when displayed but we had a pouring thunderstorm that Halloween and everything stayed in place (see photo below).

730190
 

·
The Haunting Girl
Joined
·
878 Posts
I'm still using Drylok over here. I have a ton of it that I picked up when mis-tints were still $5.00. I like the sandy texture and it is a waterproofer. However, I have heard that some people have issues with it bubbling over time? I haven't had any problems though.
Be kind to the people in the paint department at your local Home Depot/Lowe's/etc and they will re-tint mis-tint paint to whatever color you want. You can make just about any color gray as long as there is enough space in the can and you know what tints to use. I used to do it all the time to get rid of obnoxious colors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
What is everyone's thoughts on the amount of words the epitaph? I know that really does depend on the width and height for what you can pull-off but we get a lot of car riders. I know this year we will probably have a larger percentage of people get out and look at things. We have our design cut, at the deepest part 3" and 24" wide, height at 44". We will be doing the writing today and finish the design. This will be our first one ever. Having good weather has always been a problem for us every Halloween so we try to enjoy the Month of October and what happens on the 31st just happens. This year is going to suck because of Covid. I know here in the South it will not stop the majority of them, we normally see a minimal of 300 people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Get ready for a lengthy response: I did a post about this particular tombstone a while back. It's very unique in that it has a metal plate embedded in the face of the tombstone that allows magnetic lettering or objects to be applied and removed. Every year I create a new display with a new title so this marquee tombstone allows me to change the lettering to fit the theme. The letters are cut from foamboard, coated in a custom made textured base coat of exterior latex paint (for waterproofing) and then hand painted with acrylic paints. Magnets are embedded in the back of each letter to allow it to “stick” to the tombstone. It took a while to figure how to apply the textured finish to the metal plate while still allowing the magnets to work. I don’t recall the specific colors of the lettering but I believe they are both Apple Barrel acrylic paint 20589E – Harvest Orange and 20760E – Kings Gold. I painted the entire letter with the yellow and then while still wet blended the orange on top. I lined each letter up so I would know how far to paint the blending paint to achieve the effect shown. I was worried about the letters falling-off when displayed but we had a pouring thunderstorm that Halloween and everything stayed in place (see photo below).

View attachment 730190
Really good weathering on that. Is that Expanded or Extruded foam? The metal plate was an outstanding idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Get ready for a lengthy response: I did a post about this particular tombstone a while back. It's very unique in that it has a metal plate embedded in the face of the tombstone that allows magnetic lettering or objects to be applied and removed. Every year I create a new display with a new title so this marquee tombstone allows me to change the lettering to fit the theme. The letters are cut from foamboard, coated in a custom made textured base coat of exterior latex paint (for waterproofing) and then hand painted with acrylic paints. Magnets are embedded in the back of each letter to allow it to “stick” to the tombstone. It took a while to figure how to apply the textured finish to the metal plate while still allowing the magnets to work. I don’t recall the specific colors of the lettering but I believe they are both Apple Barrel acrylic paint 20589E – Harvest Orange and 20760E – Kings Gold. I painted the entire letter with the yellow and then while still wet blended the orange on top. I lined each letter up so I would know how far to paint the blending paint to achieve the effect shown. I was worried about the letters falling-off when displayed but we had a pouring thunderstorm that Halloween and everything stayed in place (see photo below).

View attachment 730190
Well I applaud you sir.. That's a top notch effect and the best I've seen.. On any tombstone! Well done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
If you do not mind me asking, how did you do your outer and inner curves? I have a nice compass on order but for my current one I used string and a push pin tied to a marker, that took forever.
I draw my templates using computer software (AutoCAD) but you can use any software with line tools. I then print them full scale on plotter paper, most office supply places have large scale plotters in their print shop. No measuring required. The raised surfaces are created by offsetting the perimeter lines (see template photo below).

730211
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I use cheap flat latex paint. I paint all the lettering and cracks black. Next I dry brush a medium dark grey. Then I use a spray bottle with white latex paint that is about 20% paint and 80% water and sray the tombstone fron the top and let it run down. Then I do the same with black latex in a spray bottle and concentrate mostly on spraying it very close and lightly where the lettering is or cracks and let that run down. It should look very transparent so the detail is subtle to give it an aged look.
Killington Lane is one of my absolute favorite inspirations. Excellent work, FSanders!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
I draw my templates using computer software (AutoCAD) but you can use any software with line tools. I then print them full scale on plotter paper, most office supply places have large scale plotters in their print shop. No measuring required. The raised surfaces are created by offsetting the perimeter lines (see template photo below).

View attachment 730211
You can also use a block printing site like BlockPosters.com (Block Posters), or a program like PosteRazor (PosteRazor - Make your own poster!) to print it out and then tape the individual pieces back together. I use PosteRazor for my templates. They now have an online version, but I haven't checked it out yet. I believe most printers also support block printing, at least mine does and it's not a very expensive one, but I have yet to figure out how to make it actually work which is why I just use PosteRazor which spits out a pdf file.

Here's a post I made with some more detail on how I go about it. They're not 100% perfect, but in the dark no one notices or cares. If I spent more time carving I could probably reduce the minor imperfections.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
You can also use a block printing site like BlockPosters.com (Block Posters), or a program like PosteRazor (PosteRazor - Make your own poster!) to print it out and then tape the individual pieces back together. I use PosteRazor for my templates. They now have an online version, but I haven't checked it out yet. I believe most printers also support block printing, at least mine does and it's not a very expensive one, but I have yet to figure out how to make it actually work which is why I just use PosteRazor which spits out a pdf file.

Here's a post I made with some more detail on how I go about it. They're not 100% perfect, but in the dark no one notices or cares. If I spent more time carving I could probably reduce the minor imperfections.

Those stones are incredible. Where did you find the graphics for the skulls on the top of them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
499 Posts
Those stones are incredible. Where did you find the graphics for the skulls on the top of them?
Thanks!! They are all based on photos of real tombstones. A few from photos I took myself at local cemeteries, some I ran across in blogs/internet searches, and quite a few from the Farber Tombstone archive (Farber Gravestone Collection). I just pick New England stones from the early 1700s up until around the 1840s, and ones that are not so complex that I will loose my mind trying to carve it out with an exacto knife.

A couple of examples:


 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top