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Discussion Starter #1
...an oscillating fan?

One of the things that makes us different than "normal" people is that we look at things differently.

I was doing some odds and ends around the homestead today, and I saw a giant, free-standing oscillating fan that I'd forgotten we even had.

Upon further examination, the cage can be taken off in a matter of seconds, and it's only a few more seconds to remove the blades, leaving just the rotating fan shaft, which of course spins and oscillates the head.

So I was wondering...what do you guys think could be done with such an ordinary base for a prop?

Anyone?
 

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Ghouls Rule
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build little paper or plastic blades and make a big fire pit with some silk pieces? Its what I plan on doing with my little box fan :D
 

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You could leave everthing intact, strap a Blacklight to the top of it, then shine it on a flying crank ghost. Your ghost woud fade in and out , and the breeze made by the fan looks very cool.
 

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If it's a floor model, just build an armature, cloth it as the ghoul of your choice, and add mask of your choice. Instant side-to-side head movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Glad we're all on the same page. My first two ideathoughts were A) blow it on something to make it come alive, and B) put a body and head on it.

As for the fire pit, Kitty....it's just too big and bulky. I have some smaller box fans lying around somewhere that would be PERFECT for that. Great suggestion!
 

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Please be careful if you remove the fan blades to use an oscilating fan for a covered prop. The electric motors can get very hot. These electric motors rely on air being drawn by the fan blade to pass over and cool the motor. While many people have had no problems with over heating, I have read of some that posed a fire hazard, especially when a latex mask or other covering is placed over the motor housing. I do not have any personal experience with this, but I have researched the topic and have opted for other forms of prop animation.

Eric
 

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I experimented with that last year with some moderate success. I did the whole build a mask over the top of the fan deal. but with a twist. I left the fan blades intact so they blew air. and left holes in the eyes and mouth on the mask. Backlit the inside of the mask with some lights. I glued little shreds of fabric around the eye and mouth holes. When the fan is on the head moves side to side and the holes flicker a lot because of the fabric blowing in the wind. and the airflow keeps the fan from overheating.
It looks pretty cool but the mask i did was kinda weak. May try to improve it this year.
 

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Open up and say "Aaaaahh"
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Here's I solved the overheating problem...AND When the prop is done being used, the fan is still usable as a fan. Uses a styrofoam wighead on a PVC pipe that holds the mask.


 

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Please be careful if you remove the fan blades to use an oscilating fan for a covered prop. The electric motors can get very hot. These electric motors rely on air being drawn by the fan blade to pass over and cool the motor. While many people have had no problems with over heating, I have read of some that posed a fire hazard, especially when a latex mask or other covering is placed over the motor housing. I do not have any personal experience with this, but I have researched the topic and have opted for other forms of prop animation.

Eric
I've heard the same thing about the fan's overheating. Some haunter's flip the fan upside down so the motor stays stationary on the ground and the mask is on the pedestal portion, turning...
 
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