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Discussion Starter #1
I am currently working on a 6-7 foot werewolf. Does anybody have any ideas on the pose or stance that I should put him in? :eek:
 

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My 2 cents: For static props, I like seeing a 'static' pose -- one that the person/thing could be in if it were actually standing still.

I like "action" poses, but if they object isn't actually moving, it loses its realism. To me anyway.

So... I dont know...
 

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Hopefully the hotlinking will not die on this, as I didnt know how to describe it so I google searched quick.

Something like this if you can pull it off:

 

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I agree with DeadTed. A prop in mid-leap that stays in mid-leap looks funky.

Personally, for a werewolf, I'd have him standing erect, knees slightly bent, feet apart. Hunched shoulders, arms down, possibly with the remnants of his latest victim still clutched in his claws.

I'd have his head slightly bowed. Basically make him look like he's exhausted from a long fight.

The effect you're looking for could be described as 'Lurking'. Like he's waiting for just the right moement to explode at you.

Just my opinion.
 

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Personal preference: standing (very un-wolflike) with arms bent. Mine is made with a PVC frame that I can pose to fit the surroundings and my liking. Often I have one arm rest on a post or wall and the other is raised so that his hand/paw is about at head level in kind of a lurking and threatening pose, as if he's about to attack his next prey. The pose and claws really add to the effect, but to me a good mask really makes the werewolf above all else. Glowing eyes aren't bad either. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Cool, thks everyone like the pic. I can actually do any pose you can think of. I have been making static props in all kinds of poses for years, just wanted some advice thanks. :D
 

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A good post by Pumpkinrot on the subjecct:
"I'm a static prop haunter. I've always been one. Until my site went live back around 2003, I never even knew there was a name for what I did. If your props move or have a spring-action mechanism which activates when they're approached or if your props are powered by compressed air cylinders, you're an animatronic or pneumatic haunter. If your props are made with tiny animal bones, you're a sociopathic haunter.

As a static prop haunter, my props are motionless. So I have to try to achieve a potential for movement - an appearance that my props are in a moment of rest, or waiting. I've found that the static props that work best are the ones that look like they've just paused for a second:

Corpses that just pushed out of the ground and are now surveying their surroundings...


Witches that are staring into a steaming cauldron thinking dark twisted things...


or a skeleton stretching out its hand seconds before the hand drops to the ground for leverage.



The static props that I've been most disappointed with in my display are the ones that end up looking like they're trapped in time - frozen in movement. That's a totally different animal than a moment of rest. It's like a photograph of a moving creature, rather than a creature about to pounce.

I think that's why I love scarecrows so much. They're motionless by their very nature. Hanging on their posts, waiting. And moving only when the wind blows.

Every Halloween, after I've set up the display, my father will come out and do a casual inspection of the haunt, "It's a shame you can't make these things move and put red lights in their eyes." I'm not about to explain to him that I'm a static prop haunter. He already thinks I'm a whacko."

PUMPKINROT.COM: What's Brewing: Haunt Theory: Static Props
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Head

Here is the head.
I will probably use a strobe light on him to make him seem to move.
 

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A good post by Pumpkinrot on the subjecct:
"I'm a static prop haunter. I've always been one. Until my site went live back around 2003, I never even knew there was a name for what I did. If your props move or have a spring-action mechanism which activates when they're approached or if your props are powered by compressed air cylinders, you're an animatronic or pneumatic haunter. If your props are made with tiny animal bones, you're a sociopathic haunter.

As a static prop haunter, my props are motionless. So I have to try to achieve a potential for movement - an appearance that my props are in a moment of rest, or waiting. I've found that the static props that work best are the ones that look like they've just paused for a second:

Corpses that just pushed out of the ground and are now surveying their surroundings...


Witches that are staring into a steaming cauldron thinking dark twisted things...


or a skeleton stretching out its hand seconds before the hand drops to the ground for leverage.



The static props that I've been most disappointed with in my display are the ones that end up looking like they're trapped in time - frozen in movement. That's a totally different animal than a moment of rest. It's like a photograph of a moving creature, rather than a creature about to pounce.

I think that's why I love scarecrows so much. They're motionless by their very nature. Hanging on their posts, waiting. And moving only when the wind blows.

Every Halloween, after I've set up the display, my father will come out and do a casual inspection of the haunt, "It's a shame you can't make these things move and put red lights in their eyes." I'm not about to explain to him that I'm a static prop haunter. He already thinks I'm a whacko."

PUMPKINROT.COM: What's Brewing: Haunt Theory: Static Props
That's about as well put as it can be.
 

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Discussion Starter #14


Here are the werewolf hands that I have almost finished with, which are fully poseable. I used hangers, wooden dowels, pillow stuffing, gloves from Target, duct tape, and faux fur from the local fabric store.
 

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Few years ago, I did a werewolf scene in my front yard. The one I thought turned out best was a static werewolf that was crouched over a dead body, with an arm in his hands (paws?). I had his head turned at a slight angle, facing the street (and onlookers) as if he had just heard something.
 

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this drawing is great, this pose is great, you have to do this pose! I like how his arms reach the ground and he is letting his meal digest.
 
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