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Hello! For my display I have multiple extension cords branching off with splitters on cords. The splitters say they are grounded and for light outdoor use meaning that it can get wet but not a whole lot. This worries me because we get a lot of rain in October here. I was wondering what everyone uses to waterproof they're outlets. I was going to get some of those sockit boxes I think they are called but they are like $20 and I need like 8. I was wondering some cheaper solutions for this. If anyone has input please let me know. Thank you and happy haunting! 馃巸馃拃
 

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Thoughts, not ideas because I haven't actually tried any of this. You might be able to look at inexpensive plastic containers to see if you can make them work. Cut slits down one side with a hole at the end the diameter of the cords. You could seal these up with silicon adhesive to waterproof them. For the splitter end (might also work for power strips) mount that to the inside of the lid. Silicon adhesive might work for that too. Or you could cut holes in the lid and use zip ties and seal the holes with silicon adhesive. Mounting it to the lid would elevate the connections just in case any water gets inside the plastic containers and collects on the inside at the bottom. You could spray paint the plastic containers any color you want to make them less visible.

If you don't want to get that fancy just wrap each connection well with electrical tape. I would use rocks or pieces of wood to elevate the connections off the ground so they aren't sitting in a puddle of water on the ground.
 

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Thanks! I think I will probably wrap the connections with tape or use some cheap plastic boxes.
I鈥檝e done all three - wrap the connections with electrical tape, use the expensive 鈥渨aterproof鈥 plastic covers, and used the cheap plastic bowls. I鈥檝e also used ziploc bags for the controllers that come with the inexpensive led string lights from China. All worked well in rain, wind and rain, fog, and even snow!
 

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I worked at a farm that does walking trails and hayrides every fall. They just wrapped all their cords in electrical tape and called it a season. I don't even bother going that far in my own yard, but it's also only set up for two weeks due to the fact I rent. If it was set up for longer I might consider using the electrical tape like at the farm. However, I found trying to reduce the number of connections to be the best practice overall.
I splurge on a few new chain (multiple outlets on the same cord in a line) and squid (a cord that splits into 3 cords) cables every year so I don't have to rely on those spliters as much. I also make sure to use to the correct length of extension cord so ideally it would be:
outlet - source cord - timer - distribution cord - (maybe extra cord if needed here) - prop/lighting.

But my yard is fairly small and my setup isn't up for very long. We do get a fair amount of rain and wind here. It has snowed once, but I didn't have a big outside setup that year. I've been lucky so far and only had one timer die in the 10+ years I've been doing this.
 

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I鈥檝e always used black electrical tape and just make sure it鈥檚 wrapped well with a tight seal. (That means wrapping quite a few times overlapping the previous wrap). Someone who used to help setup a local large Christmas light display taught me this and it鈥檚 never failed. Electrical tape is fairly inexpensive and I doesn鈥檛 leave a sticky residue when you take it off.

the one year I put my display out late in the month, I decided to not wrap the cords. We had a torrential downpour the week of Halloween. The night of halloween, there were cords that still had water on/in them bc the lights kept tripping the breaker and my entire yard kept going dark. It was not fun - I had to figure out which one was doing it which took me a good 20-30 minutes during the peak ToT time.
 

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Favorite Halloween theme. It changes. I usually go for creepy and supernatural. Nothing too scary.
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I do electrical tape and if three plugs and only using 2 wrap up the one not being used. I do this to for the Christmas Inflatables and they sit under snow. I do with some bigger things have thrown totes over. I typically haven't covered up stake outlets and have never had an issue so far, but I try to put them where they wouldn't get the full blunt of a storm either or a spot that would collect water. Actually have 1 zip tied to my chain link fence that been out there a couple of years with no issues.
 

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I'm so lazy that I found using tape was too much work to remove quickly at the end of the night. I'd recommend using snips. So I cut up a black plastic trash bag, wrap the pieces around the cords and staple them closed. It's worked for several years that included rain and snow storms.
 

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Over the years I鈥檝e invested in waterproofing outdoor electrical connections. Bought things on sale or when needed sometimes and added to over time. Now I think I鈥檓 pretty much covered everywhere and no worries. Halloween occasionally will be rainy here but pretty much always wet during winter so the items are used each year and make for quick set up and tear down.

When we re-did our yard, we installed 鈥渋n use covers鈥 on all our outdoor electrical covers. Price I鈥檓 seeing in Home Depot for single gang outlets is under $10. Good investment and required by code in many areas. Certainly don鈥檛 want a short in wiring at house and risk fire in your house wall.

Over the years I have bought those multi-plug tower boxes that you stake in your yard and those also have covers that keep water out like the in-use covers. Another good investment. I find the 3-5 plug versions pretty sufficient to allow for a good yard area coverage of extension cords and lighting. Outdoor rated extension cords of varying lengths are another useful item to have on hand. Easy to find in brown and green cord colors. Bought a few from Home Depot around halloween/christmas time on sale. If you鈥檙e planning for multi-year outdoor light decorating, definitely watch for sales in the Sept-Jan. timeframe.

I also invested in the cord cover connection boxes mentioned above. Picked up some from Lowes a few years back. Versions made to accomodate both string light plugs and heavy duty extension cords.
 

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Hello! For my display I have multiple extension cords branching off with splitters on cords. The splitters say they are grounded and for light outdoor use meaning that it can get wet but not a whole lot. This worries me because we get a lot of rain in October here. I was wondering what everyone uses to waterproof they're outlets. I was going to get some of those sockit boxes I think they are called but they are like $20 and I need like 8. I was wondering some cheaper solutions for this. If anyone has input please let me know. Thank you and happy haunting! 馃巸馃拃
Every Halloween, eventhough I was in California, I wrapped all of my extensions in electrical tape. One year I bought about 10 sockit boxes at an after-Christmas sale for a couple bucks each. I still end up using electrical tape! Easy, inexpensive (buy a 5 pack!), and easy to take apart after. You can use as much as you need to create a waterproof connection and keep your Halloween budget intact! 馃拃鈽狆煈火煄凁煒
 

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I do nothing. I use a mix of indoor and outdoor cords. We get a lot of rain ( and occasionally snow!) In October. I have never had one issue. I am constantly plugging stuff in and off in the rain, dozens of times a year. One year in rain I kept getting zapped by one connection, but.thats it, in hundreds of plug-ins and outs over years of rain. No.idea.why I got zapped that one time.

Edit: I do not recommend doing it this way. I should be more careful.
 

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I do nothing. I use a mix of indoor and outdoor cords. We get a lot of rain ( and occasionally snow!) In October. I have never had one issue. I am constantly plugging stuff in and off in the rain, dozens of times a year. One year in rain I kept getting zapped by one connection, but.thats it, in hundreds of plug-ins and outs over years of rain. No.idea.why I got zapped that one time. But 110 isn't gonna kill anyone.
Same here!!! I always thought they are called outdoor cords for a reason?? I have never used anything to "waterproof" them.
 

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I do nothing. I use a mix of indoor and outdoor cords. We get a lot of rain ( and occasionally snow!) In October. I have never had one issue. I am constantly plugging stuff in and off in the rain, dozens of times a year. One year in rain I kept getting zapped by one connection, but.thats it, in hundreds of plug-ins and outs over years of rain. No.idea.why I got zapped that one time. But 110 isn't gonna kill anyone.
Agree with all of this except the last line. 120vac house current can definitely kill you. Electrocution is caused by just a couple of amps but there must be enough voltage to push it, and 120 volts is plenty of push. This is not to say that you can't get slightly zapped with no serious effects, but a longer connection to it can kill.
 
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