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So this is going to be my second year putting together my yard for Halloween. Last year I used the fog machines with some DIY chillers that worked nice enough but I wasn't quite getting the effect I wanted in my cemetery.

My one friend thought it might be a good idea to use a garden hose that is staked down throughout the cemetery and then holes drilled into it.

Has anyone tried this? If so how did it turn out? If not, what do you experts think?

The only problem I could think of is that the machine wouldn't be able to force the fog through the hose all the way. I was thinking of adding a small computer fan to help it through the hose if need be.
 

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Rutherford Manor Haunt
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We use a dryer vent hose and fan to distribute fog around our yard. We have also used PVC drilled with holes in a couple of areas. I am not sure a garden hose would get the through put you need. How big is your cemetery?
 

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I've used 4" corrugated drain pipe buried under leaves--it's black, so between the darkness and the leaves, it's invisible. I would be worried that a garden hose would be too small to get a good distribution. I'd think that you'd need pretty sizable holes, and then the pressure in the hose might force most of your fog out before it gets very far. Might be a useful experiment to try, though.
 

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I use the metallic dryer vent. It compacts down to a little bag. I painted the top 2/3rds black and scatter leaves and pine straw on it to hide it. Be sure to leave a gap between the dryer vent and the fog machine. I took regular masking tape and closed off the end. Then I took a knife and cut holes in it at about a 45 degree angle along the sides. If you make them too large then just use masking tape to make them smaller. It's easier if you have the fogger hooked up when cutting the holes so you can make them right the first try. I also took metal clothe hangers and cut them, then shaped them into a U. Used these as anchors for the ducting. This is the easiest and cheapest way I've found.

Here is an example, in the daylight you can see the hump but at night, you can't. There is actually 2 different hidden ducts in this picture.

image.jpeg
 

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Looking at this brings up an idea I had but never tried. I wonder how well that 4" corrugated drain pipe would work if it were cut in half lengthwise with the cut side down on the ground?
 

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I'm just wondering if I'd lose too much fog at the beginning of the run, so that there would not be much output farther downstream. It would probably have to be staked down pretty firmly at least.
 

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Cool idea on the downspout extension. You could run this one from the back of the yard to the front and the fog
come out the sides.... I might go get 2 of these and try them this year. More stuff to work on :)
 

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Looking at this brings up an idea I had but never tried. I wonder how well that 4" corrugated drain pipe would work if it were cut in half lengthwise with the cut side down on the ground?
I think it would depend on how smooth and level the ground is. Everywhere you don't have perfect contact with the ground you'll leak fog. Were you thinking about cutting it in half to save money? Understandable, this thing is $6 per 28 inches so if you had a long run in mind it would get pricey really quick! However the good part is that it will connect perfectly to regular gutter downspout material so if you do have a long run you can do most of it with cheap downspout until you reach the visible area of the haunt, then connect it to the more expensive 'flat' pipe. You connect it with one of these: http://www.lowes.com/pd/InvisaFlow-52-in-Black-Vinyl-Downspout-Extension/3501756
A little silicone caulk around all the joints will make sure you don't lose any fog at all.

The only problem is if you have a really long run, you're going to need something to push or pull the fog out. You'd need a gentle fan somewhere inline to keep the fog moving, otherwise it'll just pile up and condense.
 

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It wouldn't really be about saving money, but more about a lower profile to make it easier to conceal. A bit of fog leakage is fine--it'll add to the effect. Too much, though, would reduce the effective run. I haven't tried it because I'm simply not convinced that it's worth the trouble.
 

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Of the various fog machines I have had, I am pretty sure none of them would be able to force fog through a garden hose.
I used to use 2" pvc pipe with long-sweep els, taped together for easy removal, storage.
Cheap.Black spray pint over the white PVC pipe for "Camo", leaves sprinkled over it. I drilled holes every 2 feet or more 3/4 inch diameter holes.
As previously mentioned here, leave a space between the pvc and the nozzle of the fog machine.
I once sent fog Down from the basement into the Wine Cellar, all it needed to work was that "Space" between nozzle and pvc.
I may have over-dosed myself with too much "Fog", because a small amount makes me have a tickle at the back of my throat, and then I have to stop doing whatever I am doing and drink some water, or choke to death.
But then... I talk non-stop for more than 90 minutes at a time for each house tour here. Maybe it wasn't the fog, but it will set off that situation, which I can't have or tolerate.
 

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I have tried soaker hose as well as regular garden hose in the past. Both yielded poor results. The garden hose was too restrictive, even with significant size holes cut in. I also had problems with condensation filling the hose with water over time, requiring me to periodically dump it out.

Sent from my SM-T320 using Tapatalk
 

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Halloween Elitist
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Is wind a factor for any of you? I don't use any tubing/hoses. I've never achieved the ground hugging effect I've always wanted , I live in deep South Texas , so its always warm and weather changes all the time and usually breezy in October
 

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Wind is nearly always an issue for me. I have on one occasion had the perfect conditions for excellent chilled ground hugging fog - on Nov 1st several years ago. Despite the terrible track record, I keep trying year after year.

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I think you need to run a test on the Garden hose. Someone mentioned the condensation issue. That could become a problem, but there may be solutions. You certainly will not get even distribution, and the fog won't make it all the way to the end, but if you could get two fog machines (and chillers) and connect one to each end of the hose, you will get better results. If you lay out the hose and have the holes facing up everywhere you want fog to come out, but also have some holes on the bottom side to let out water from condensation you might be OK. I think the biggest question is: "Is the house too small a diameter and too restrictive for the output of the foggers? If you don't mind digging some trenches in your yard, you could half-submerge some 1 1/2" PVC pipe (either schedule 80 which is grey or painted black) with holes in it where you need it, and still have it hidden, but it would make a mess of your lawn and be a lot more work. I think if you had two foggers at opposite ends of a garden hose with the right holes in it, you might be OK. The foggers can be right next to each other in the same location and just have the hose wind out, around, and back.
 
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