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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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Fog machines don't use water vapor. It is a glycol mix that is vaporized with high heat. As the fog cools the glycol will condense and settle, so it will require constant operation and will not linger long in an outdoor situation.

Unless you have access to a movie quality level fog machine, you will not be able to achieve any real describable level of fog in a large outdoor area, and I'd say it would be pretty much impossible to achieve a realistic blanket of fog over even a quarter acre area let alone 2+ acres.

Fog's enemy is wind/air movement. If there is the least little breeze, it will be dissipated quickly. Piping fog across an area will work for limited applications - decent sized yards for instance - but not the level you're wanting.

If you really want a fog effect over a large area, you're might want to consider having a good amount of foggers every so many yards aimed at the path your guests will be following. I would suggest just having them stationed along the path itself (a few yards off the path really) so the effect is seen from the area that actually will be visible. But again, if the night(s) are windy, it is a waste of effort to use lots of fog since it will be blown away as soon as it is produced.
 

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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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So heat is required to keep the fog "foggy" through a very long tube?

Hmmm.. Several foggers. The cost is not an issue. Getting power out to them is an issue.
No, heat is only to create the fog (foggers have a heating element inside them and the glycol is passed through the heating element and then forced through a fine screen to create the mist/fog). There are dozens of home made fog chillers that you can build specifically to make the hot fog mist cool down quickly so it hugs the ground better - heat rises, cold sinks. ( I realize that I said in my early post "as the fog cools" but it will be fine run through a fog chiller). Another factor is how cold it gets where you are, if you're trying for low ground fog. You're going to be fighting ambient temperatures. If you run 50˚F or under, most fog chillers will have difficulties cooling the fog down enough to get it to hug the ground.

But even if you have zero wind, the glycol fog will eventually dissipate due to the tiny drops of glycol in the fog coalescing together and then being subject to gravity. So foggers that run intermittantly (through a fog chiller if you are trying to get ground hugging fog) might be the answer.

Dry ice can be a beautiful fog effect, but it is completely impractical for what usage you're wanting. You have to add pellets of dry ice to hot water (the hotter the water, the better the dry ice effect). It also dissipates pretty fast - MUCH faster than fog machine fog. So you'd have to have someone out there adding dry ice to a constant heated water source for however long you want fog.
 

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black light queen
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if cost is no object, my suggestion would to get multiple commercial grade foggers ... i don't know how many you'll need ... run the fog through the corrugated drain pipe as suggested by eerie erie haunts ... as for power, since cost is no object i suggest getting generators and construction grade extension cords running to the foggers

and what ever you do, do not cheap out on fog juice ... get froggy's fog :)

even if you weren't using professional grade foggers, i'd recommend froggy's for all fog machines

good luck ... keep us posted ... i for one, am curious how this turns out :)

amk
 

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Also, a big consideration is what do you want the fog to look like? Do you want it airborn, above the ground hanging in the air .. If so no cooling required. If you want it to hug the ground and 'creep' it becomes a lot more difficult since the fog needs to be cooled with a fog chiller, then pretty much dispensed immediately .. Even walking through chilled fog will disperse it, much less wind.

Creeping fog out of a chiller .. See the front is creeping, but the stuff in back is already starting to lift?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for the replies. You folks seem to know a lot more about this stuff than I do. A few years ago, money was "no object" but now that time has passed and I have returned countless favors, and helped friends out of costly situations, well .... I am no longer a guy who doesn't worry about money. It earns so slow, and spends so quickly. Now I am shifting gears and wondering what lies ahead.

Joe
 

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We have a few suggestions if shifting gears allows you to work with a reduced haunting footprint. Everyone who's made suggestions not to try and cover two acres of land is spot on. Your visitors won’t probably see the fog the way you hope they will. Wind and normal dispersion will wipe out any synthetic version of fog moving across open spaces. Now that your budget is reduced, choosing a different approach is not only advisable, but it actually might be more effective in relation to a haunt.

We live next to the Jackson Bottom wetlands. Over the years, we've learned something about fog coming up from “the moors”. We have nights of fog that blankets everything with low creeping fog. We have other nights where you can't see the lights from the park half a block away because the fog fills the air. But there are also nights when patchy low lying fog is just in areas flowing along the paths where water flows, and it's perfectly clear everywhere else. Which is what you might consider when it comes to the fog you create. Even Mother Nature knows sometimes you can't make enough fog to cover everything, but even a little goes a long way in establishing ambiance.

Depending on where you live, you can wet down the ground. When the fog machine turns on, it will generally flow first along the wet areas and then bleed out into the drier areas. A graveyard with even just a bit of fog flowing around it is all most people need to see to believe the illusion that fog is rolling in. You can use the fog to give a single prop a creepier presence by lighting the prop through the rising fog. Everyone knows what we put out isn't real. It helps to remember the people who come to visit us want to believe. They want to be scared just a bit, and they’re very forgiving when we make the effort.

We sure hope that finances aren't stressed to the point where you can’t even think of haunting, but from two who make almost everything in our haunt from free and severely discounted stuff, we know the fun that can be had from just slowly creating the haunt of our dreams over years. We've kept adding to the haunt instead of trying to do it all from the get go. As you rethink what lies ahead, taking it one step at a time can get you further than you might think. After all, look what it does for every monster out there. They shuffle along and somehow still catch up with everyone running at full gallop. We all could learn from their technique.
 

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How would I go about covering my entire 2.5 acre lot with fog? Will fog travel through PVC tubes without losing the fog effect, or does it become water inside of a tube at some point?
I believe what you are trying to achieve is something similar to the attached photos. The scene is from the October 24,2018 episode of "American Housewife - Trust Me". It would help to have a photo of the 2.5 acres that you are trying to cover in fog as there are a lot of variables that need to be accounted for. Is it flat, open grass fields or rugged tree covered natural areas. Are there a lot of leaves, is the ground moist, etc... My advice would be:
1. Provide as much protection from wind as possible (property surrounded by trees or buildings) - wind will disperse the fog quickly and ruin your effect.
2. Provide a low barrier (fence, logs, bales of hay) to keep the fog contained
3. Cover the display area with leaves or fine mulch and soak the area with water - this will give the fog (glycol particles) something to attach too and keep it at ground level
4. Use commercial grade fog chillers setup around the perimeter to disperse inwards. This should cover a large area ( https://www.froggysfog.com/machines/fog-machines.html#page=1). Don't use a tube with these chillers as they are meant to spread a large cloud of fog over a large area. These foggers are expensive so you may want to rent them instead.
5. If you want more concentrated disbursement you can use perforated tubes filled with dry ice and frozen water bottles with the discharge holes near the top so they don't get blocked. Us a "Y" connector at the fog machine and a fan to blow the fog down the tube. This will only work over a small area 150 s.f. to 200 s.f.
6. Regardless of what type of fogger / fog solution you use it will on last a few minutes. To keep it sustained for a long period of time will take a lot of solution and a lot of effort maintaining the foggers.

Best thing to do is layout the machines, test and make adjustments. Good luck let us know if it works.
 

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That's a pretty good list and very helpful but any references to a "haunted yard" from a TV or movie production doesn't count....They have a production crew to make things look perfect for the 5 minutes they film giving us the impression it looks like that all evening....I know you already knew that but I just wanted to talk about it because before I started obsessing over things like low lying fog over the yard, I'd think "I want to do low lying fog like in this show/movie"....Then after all the research realizing they had a crew standing by ready and waiting for the cue to make the fog perfect, maybe even doing the shot on a sound stage so having the advantage of being indoors to boot.....My favorite pro haunt years ago had the perfect cemetery scene you walked through with the low lying fog but it was inside of a former Lowes building....I managed to buy most of the props from that cemetery scene when they sold off everything but I don't have the building to recreate what they had accomplished so well....I'm thinking I could justify it if I could talk the wife into an oversized detached 2 car garage to keep the cars in and forget to tell her about the part where I make it into a cemetery the last 2 weeks of October....ZR


I believe what you are trying to achieve is something similar to the attached photos. The scene is from the October 24,2018 episode of "American Housewife - Trust Me". It would help to have a photo of the 2.5 acres that you are trying to cover in fog as there are a lot of variables that need to be accounted for. Is it flat, open grass fields or rugged tree covered natural areas. Are there a lot of leaves, is the ground moist, etc... My advice would be:
1. Provide as much protection from wind as possible (property surrounded by trees or buildings) - wind will disperse the fog quickly and ruin your effect.
2. Provide a low barrier (fence, logs, bales of hay) to keep the fog contained
3. Cover the display area with leaves or fine mulch and soak the area with water - this will give the fog (glycol particles) something to attach too and keep it at ground level
4. Use commercial grade fog chillers setup around the perimeter to disperse inwards. This should cover a large area ( https://www.froggysfog.com/machines/fog-machines.html#page=1). Don't use a tube with these chillers as they are meant to spread a large cloud of fog over a large area. These foggers are expensive so you may want to rent them instead.
5. If you want more concentrated disbursement you can use perforated tubes filled with dry ice and frozen water bottles with the discharge holes near the top so they don't get blocked. Us a "Y" connector at the fog machine and a fan to blow the fog down the tube. This will only work over a small area 150 s.f. to 200 s.f.
6. Regardless of what type of fogger / fog solution you use it will on last a few minutes. To keep it sustained for a long period of time will take a lot of solution and a lot of effort maintaining the foggers.

Best thing to do is layout the machines, test and make adjustments. Good luck let us know if it works.
 

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It's going to be tough but I've seen it work under the right conditions. My neighbor has a CHAUVET HURRICANE H1800 FLEX Fog/Smoke Pro Machine which can put out a lot of fog... almost continuous. He used Froggy's freezin fog juice. He then built a trashcan fog chiller and pumps the fog through that. The first year he had it going full tilt and it covered probably 1.5 acres in our neighborhood (basically 6-7 houses/lots).

Here's the thing: he's at the lowest point in the neighborhood geographically, we'd had rain earlier in the day (so the ground was wet) and there was zero wind. All factors that help the fog stay around. It was perfect conditions.

If I were trying to do this myself, I'd get 5-6 1200W foggers and have them running into fog chillers and spaced around the to acres. (Not sure if that's feasible for you or not).
 
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