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Discussion Starter #1
I am a newbie. I'm doing a haunted trail in the woods in my backyard. It is mostly for younger kids. I would love some suggestions on how to light the path. I don't want too much light so you can see the props before you are supposed to but I would like it to be lit enough so they can see where they are going. Battery powered would be ideal but I can get an extension cord back there if absolutely necessary. The trail is about 500-800 ft long. All suggestions welcome. Thank you!
 

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I don't have a haunted trail but I have a walk through graveyard. I tried solar lights one year and not enough light. I use some LED floodlights from Lowes they sell with the Christmas lights but probably too much light. You could use rope light either laying on the ground or on light stakes. They sell spools in 150 lengths. LED could all be connected in one length and regular lights are limited to 150 feet per plug. The other option is use christmas lights. I used some white c9 LED at the bottom of my halloween fence next to the sidewalk. Enough light for the sidewalk but not too much to wash out the rest of the yard. You will have to try different ways to get the effect you want. I think the rope light would be a good choice since it is continuous and you have a lot of color choices. I hope this helps you get started.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I ended up using a combination of battery operated tea lights along the ground and I bought some of the red mini led lights that are sold on fright props. I used those to try and highlight the props. Those were pretty narrow and specific so in some cases you couldn't see everything that I wanted you to see. They kept the surroundings dark pretty nicely though. For my first trail I was happy and it came out ok. There are certainly improvements to make next year!
 

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I use witch jars. I can stand them on the ground or hang them on branches along a trail and they are ridiculously cheap - jars from food (everything from spaghetti sauce and salsa jars to pickle and relish and olive jars to mayonnaise and jelly jars; jars of all shapes and sizes as long as a tealight LED candle will fit through the mouth easily) I dirty them up with some paint, fog them with a coat of white glue and dull clear cote, wrap the lid threading with twine hot glued in place,and add a twine handle loop. I also hot glue a length of twine to the top of every LED candle to make placement and removal easy - saves from wasting an hour rattling the jars until the candles settle fake flame up.

Overall, each jar costs me less than $1.25 to make and my kitchen easily produces enough empty jars to make 70 to 100 per year. There are other sources for waste jars as well, like cosmetic products.
 
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