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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure which catagory to put this under since its technically for prop building BUT oh well. I was going to buy a bunch of new power tools this year (table saws a drill that lasts for more then 15 minutes, ect) i was wondering what tools people used for their builds (Fences, collumns, ect)
 

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Human Candy Shovel
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The four big power tools you'll want are bench power tools.
A compound miter saw.
A table saw.
A router and router table.
A drill press.

Well, there's a fifth big power tool, but you don't mount that one on a bench. That would be an air compressor unit. That's useful for cleaning and vital for painting.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hmm i was hoping for something more specific but i guess i was a bit vague. Okay Which is better: Dewalt Drill 18V or Mikita 18V for say making fences, or which is the best table saw that wont cost me $500++++
 

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Keeper of Spider Hill
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I build a fair amount of props (mostly animated stuff). Both Dewalt and Mikita make good drills. I have a Ryobi that my wife bought me 4-5 years ago. It is 18 volts and I have used it building and around the house as my primary drill all that time. I just recently bought new batteries for it. Also, you may want to consider a drill that has other accessories available for it like sanders and such. My point is that it was a $99 drill and has serverd me well. If it failed tomorrow I'd probably go out and buy the same one again.

If it were me, and I had to go out and start over, I would certainly put a drill press on my list. I use mine all the time. Buy the biggest one you can. I started out with a benchtop model and then upgraded to a floor standing unit. Drill presses are great for repetitive jobs too like making a fence where you need to drill a bunch of holes. It's easy make make yourself a guide and you'll get nice straight holes through your material every time. There are also attachments you can get for center drilling round stock like PVC pipe. I use that thing all the time. No way you will do that consistently with a hand drill.

If you are going to by a miter saw, I would consider getting one that has the slide rails on it. That will alow you to cut much wider material and a miter saw will also give you nice cuts on softer materials like PVC.

I hope that helps.
 

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when buying power tools i use amazon.com to research tools before i buy them. i sort by avg. customer review and read others opinions on the pros and cons of each tool.
 

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What you want to build determines what tools you want to own. The bigger the variety of materials you use and the more complex the projects results in a larger 'tool box'. That being said, you can do plenty without many power tools at all. Rome built an empire, the Egyptians, even the pilgrims did plenty without power tools!
 

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Insert Witty Comment Here
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What you want to build determines what tools you want to own. The bigger the variety of materials you use and the more complex the projects results in a larger 'tool box'. That being said, you can do plenty without many power tools at all. Rome built an empire, the Egyptians, even the pilgrims did plenty without power tools!
I agree. If you're just looking to make PVC fencing for Halloween then you are wasting a lot of money. Make friends with someone who has the tools.
 

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Going bump in the night..
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Something I haven't seen mentioned (here, or anywhere very often) - a large, solid vice with a good sized area to pound on.
Mount this on a solid work bench - there are times you want something completely immobilized (and not just victims).

I'll throw in another vote for a Dremel rotary tool - especially with the Flex-Shaft extension (and I do recommend an actual Dremel, compared to a cheaper substitute - I've had both, and the Dremel is still going long after others have fallen apart).
Of all the tools I use, this is tied with my cordless drill for most used.

I use Makita for my drills - both cordless and on a cord. I can't recommend them enough. They've never let me down.

Some other tools I have:
Band saw - used extensively.
Drill press - not used as much as hand drills.
Router - small table top set up.
Table saw - for big jobs. Always treat this one with respect.
Disk sander - love this thing. Talk about taking the tedium out of sanding
Air compressor - always a new use for this around the house as well.
Reciprocating saw - so many different blades, so many things to cut.
Angle grinder - once again, different disks for many different materials make this a versatile tool.
Jigsaw - cutting curves, interchangeable blades.

Lots more - stopping now. List too long as is.
 

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What tools do I use? You ever watch "New Yankee Workshop"? Now picture his shop after being hit by a F4 tornado and you have an idea of what my shop is like.:D
 

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Rigdi Orbital sander, Ryobi 18v cordless driver and circular saw, extra battery's Craftsman sawszall, drill, and a Dremel tons of attachments. And I'm still finding the need for more tools.
 

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Insert Witty Comment Here
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Something I haven't seen mentioned (here, or anywhere very often) - a large, solid vice with a good sized area to pound on.
Mount this on a solid work bench - there are times you want something completely immobilized (and not just victims). Yep, Use that one...It's amust when you don't feel like dragging out the drill press

I'll throw in another vote for a Dremel rotary tool - especially with the Flex-Shaft extension (and I do recommend an actual Dremel, compared to a cheaper substitute - I've had both, and the Dremel is still going long after others have fallen apart).
Of all the tools I use, this is tied with my cordless drill for most used. Have had one for many years, never used it. Thought I was going to make toumbstones

I use Makita for my drills - both cordless and on a cord. I can't recommend them enough. They've never let me down (Not gonna pick a brand on drills, but I have several of these and use them all the time. I rarely use nails so everything is screwed together. Always have one with a pilot bit and another with a Phillips head ready to go)

Some other tools I have:
Band saw - used extensively ( would like one of these, no place to put it)
Drill press - not used as much as hand drills. (Bought one four years ago....still in the box...don't do enough repetitive drilling to make it worth it.)
Router - small table top set up. (Have one, don't use it...If I build another funeral carriage, I will break it out and use extensively on the wheels)
Table saw - for big jobs. Always treat this one with respect. (Yep...scary SOB..Have one haven't used it in about 6 years.)
Disk sander - love this thing. Talk about taking the tedium out of sanding (Don't have one...not necessary for me as I haven't built anything that I feel needs sanded.)
Air compressor - always a new use for this around the house as well. (Have one, use for pneumatic props, need to get some tools for it for non Halloween projects)
Reciprocating saw - so many different blades, so many things to cut. (Love this bad boy...have gone through a couple cutting down pallets)
Angle grinder - once again, different disks for many different materials make this a versatile tool. (used to use to cut rebar, now use a little chop saw from Harbor Freight)
Jigsaw - cutting curves, interchangeable blades. (THIS..SO MUCH THIS!!!! Couldn't do halloween without it.)

Lots more - stopping now. List too long as is.

Joe's got a good list here, the only thing I don't see is a chop saw, but you really need to know yourself and what you're going to build in the future before you invest in tools. Are you detail oriented,,,then get the finishing tools. If you're like me, hey, it's Halloween, it'll look great in the dark; then get a jigsaw and a lot of blades. And above all, know what you're getting into...pretty much everything on that list will take off and appendage or two.
 

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Reaper Guardian
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Something I haven't seen mentioned (here, or anywhere very often) - a large, solid vice with a good sized area to pound on.
Mount this on a solid work bench - there are times you want something completely immobilized (and not just victims).
Amen. I'll go one step further, while admitting freely that it's a "nice to have." If you have room, rather than pounding on the vise, get a small anvil. For what most people here do, a 50 lb Harbor Freight anvil shaped object is sufficient. This is not a replacement for the vise, it's in addition to. You don't need it, but it comes in awfully handy.
 

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Amen. I'll go one step further, while admitting freely that it's a "nice to have." If you have room, rather than pounding on the vise, get a small anvil. For what most people here do, a 50 lb Harbor Freight anvil shaped object is sufficient. This is not a replacement for the vise, it's in addition to. You don't need it, but it comes in awfully handy.
I just went to my local Harbor Freight yesterday and picked one up. I was getting fed up trying to use my vice as an anvil. Now I just need to cut a log to use as a base.
 
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