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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Note: This is a repost of an old tutorial whose links to pictures were broken with the software update at HF.

This technique shows how to use latex paint put on by a stencil to block the eating away effects of spray paint. This is good for Celtic designs or other large designs.





Herman Secret has a great tutorial showing how to use stickers to block out part of a stone when you are spray painting it for aging: https://www.halloweenforum.com/threads/easy-tombstones.68179/#post-455023 I had to do a few different things because I had a large area to do.



Close-up of what to expect.



There are many ways to make a stencil. I like the fabric method but I'm sure there are better ways out there.

Prepare the backing: Layout interfacing material onto an ironing board. Then following directions on Heat N' Bond, iron-on the 'glue'. In the second picture you can see the 'glue' now on the interfacing (shiny part). The third picture shows you what to look for at the fabric store.



Pattern: Look for a pattern you like on the web or draw your own. Print it as large as you can using the 'poster' option for printing. Tape the printed pages together and then make the pattern darker with a black Sharpie. The first picture shows the backside of the pattern darkened. Place the inked side onto the glued interfacing. Following directions on the Heat N' Bond, iron it to the interfacing. You've now made your paper much stiffer and resilient to the painting process. In the second picture you see the pattern showing through the interfacing.

Cut out the pattern.



Paint with Latex: Use pins to hold the stencil onto the tombstone. Then dip a rag into the latex paint (any color) and rag on the paint. You don't have to be perfect here. Do two coats of paint and remove the stencil.

Spray Paint: Take your tombstone outside and hit the pattern hard with spray paint. It will start to eat away at the foam and leave the latex painted foam generally alone. It does get in there a bit but that's important to make it look realistic.

Drylok: Paint the whole tombstone with two coats of gray Drylok. Let dry between coats.



After following painting techniques for making tombstones look ancient (tea-staining, drybrushing) you will see it really makes the effect pop.



Obelisk stones are great for being an anchor to the graveyard.


 

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Terra, I'm about to start on my first tombstone ever (your Youtube videos are a big help btw). I bought original Drylok (white). Didn't see a gray variety. Does that matter? Would you suggest I do 50/50 mix with black latex paint to get a neutral gray? Also when do you opt for brushing on acetone vs spray paint to eat away at the foam?
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Terra, I'm about to start on my first tombstone ever (your Youtube videos are a big help btw). I bought original Drylok (white). Didn't see a gray variety. Does that matter? Would you suggest I do 50/50 mix with black latex paint to get a neutral gray? Also when do you opt for brushing on acetone vs spray paint to eat away at the foam?
Sorry it took me so long to respond to this. You could go ahead and add black paint to it but add a little at a time until you get the color you are looking for. I don't think you'd need much. Alternately, you can bring the Drylok back to the store and have them tint it for you. They have the formulations from Drylok in their computer.

I like brushing the acetone when I want more control. But for this stone the spray paint was perfect.
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Beautiful. What adhesive do you use to glue your foam pieces?
Sorry it took me so long to reply to this question. Back them I used Loctite foamboard adhesive but they don't make it anymore. Here is a video showing my search to find a better glue. There are several to choose from - depending on your need:
 

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[mention]Terra [/mention] Here’s my obelisk using your stencil approach. It’s nearly done save for 1 or 2 more tea stains. Overall I’m very pleased. Just wondering if this ever happened to you....the top vertical portion stencils worked beautifully. But the bottom Celtic cross, same foam board, I could not get the spray paint to eat away at the foam as effectively. And I hit it hard MANY times and even tried couple differently spray paints. I just don’t get it. (But generally just as well...nothing wrong with bottom piece showing different uneven wear as compared to top).




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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Your stone looks amazing!

I used the spray paint technique because of its unpredictability. But, that is risky - it could end up in a good direction or a bad direction. In some areas, the foam would dissolve a lot and in others it wouldn't. My intention was to use the fact that nature dissolves stone in unpredictable ways and this technique speeds that process up. But, in your case - it seems that it dissolved in forms that you weren't looking for. I've got some solutions for you but first - lemme explain spray paint cans on foam:

The paint isn't what is dissolving the foam, it is the solvent mixed into the paint. So, as you spray - the paint along with its solvent goes onto the foam and the race is on. The solvent begins to dissolve the foam but as the paint dries - it begins to protect the foam. The end result of dissolving depends on your spraying technique (perhaps spraying too far away - solvent evaporated before hitting the stone) and the amount of solvent that is expelled along with the paint. This unpredictability is great for some projects but others you need more predictable results. That is why I also will directly apply acetone instead.

Another factor that could inhibit the dissolving effect is if the surface of the foam is in pristine condition. I've found that any marred, bruised and scratched areas dissolved faster. I attribute that to the solvent being able to penetrate deeper into the foam.

As I said, I think your stone looks great already but if you want additional effects, you could scrape, gouge or sand away random areas of the foam to expose it again. Then, either respray or directly apply acetone. Hope that helps :)
 
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