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Discussion Starter #1
We all know what great items are being sold for Halloween weather it's a creepy prop or a spooktacular costume.

I have a problem with Spirit Halloween. You people can say what you want.

I usually don't get disturbed easily but, the Spirit Store had some very nasty stuff last year. They had a farm on display with a spinning saw blade cutting a man in half through the bottom and to the chest. There was a noise of someone screaming in pain. Human organs were hanging off the barn roof and dead cut up bodies were everywhere!

Okay, does anyone find that just at least a little too much? Everyone focuses on the blood and gore, but what is Halloween meant for? Getting scared, not getting disturbed or grossed out. Most people thought the Texas Chainsaw Massacre was just gross and not scary. Maybe it was a little scary, but that was only when someone was getting chased! Not when Grampa was sucking blood out the girl's finger. That isn't scary. Halloween the movie was considered even more scary, because it was mainly the chasing and hiding.

Does anyone even understand me or feel the same way?

The Spookinite Webmaster
 

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Wisp in the Mist
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I know that there are a lot of people who do like to decorate like that, but I personally don't, either. That's what those kinds of movies are for, IMO. If I wanted to see it, I'd rent one.

That's why I always say I like the "eerie type of scary", because it seems like there's more and more gore each year.
 

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We all know what great items are being sold for Halloween weather it's a creepy prop or a spooktacular costume.

I have a problem with Spirit Halloween. You people can say what you want.

I usually don't get disturbed easily but, the Spirit Store had some very nasty stuff last year. They had a farm on display with a spinning saw blade cutting a man in half through the bottom and to the chest. There was a noise of someone screaming in pain. Human organs were hanging off the barn roof and dead cut up bodies were everywhere!

Okay, does anyone find that just at least a little too much? Everyone focuses on the blood and gore, but what is Halloween meant for? Getting scared, not getting disturbed or grossed out. Most people thought the Texas Chainsaw Massacre was just gross and not scary. Maybe it was a little scary, but that was only when someone was getting chased! Not when Grampa was sucking blood out the girl's finger. That isn't scary. Halloween the movie was considered even more scary, because it was mainly the chasing and hiding.

Does anyone even understand me or feel the same way?

The Spookinite Webmaster
Bravo!!!

Yes, I am right there with you. I don't like blood and guts and gore. For me, Halloween is about that delicious little shiver that goes up your spine, not the 'I wanna vomit because this is disgusting' sensation. I think society in general has gone too far (altho i do love me some Walking Dead) in unabashed un-censored sensationalism for sake of shocking people. And it is de-sensitising us to violence and all sorts of mayhem and, imho, that isn't good for the human psyche. I truly feel this desensitization played parts in the Massacres at Sandy Hook, the movie theater and Columbine.

I guess I'm old-fashioned and I don't care. I don't want the few kids in my neighborhood to be afraid to come to my house on Halloween (or more likely, their Parents forbid it.)

I so totally agree with you.
 

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Lord of the Cemetery
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I'm not a great gore-hound, I must say. I'm a great fan of the old Universal and Hammer horror movies, so I like to keep things quite dark and atmospheric.
My haunt is designed to be suitable for a broad spectrum of patrons, so I don't overdo the gore as I don't think it's either suitable or necessary. A dark menacing atmosphere with a few good shocks and scares always seems to get more reaction from the visitors than grossing them out. Having said that, I do believe gore-shop haunts have their place, and the older teenagers seem to expect to see everything doused in buckets of blood... A sign of the times, perhaps?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, the walking dead is different though, because those are mainly zombies getting killed and not humans. A good thing about the walking dead is that is it shows team work and people working together which leads to a good outcome. :)
 

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Yeah, the walking dead is different though, because those are mainly zombies getting killed and not humans. A good thing about the walking dead is that is it shows team work and people working together which leads to a good outcome. :)
I dunno, spookster...a squashed head with blood and gore spattering boots and pants is still a squarshed head. Bleh. But I love WD in spite of the graphic nature. It IS the plot, characterizations and underlying 'moral of the story' that makes it so fabulous.
 

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I'm in the medical field.. so it takes alot to offend me... that being said however...
I tend to decorate more errie than grotesque... more old style Halloween than hack and slash.. a couple shocking decorations but mainly try to scare with suspense than make the regular folk vomit... We like to make come made corpse props, real Hearses and caskets.. Just more authentic than cheap gore store bought props... I don't buy them..
On a side note, It seems every Halloween costume has little fabric to it now too.. in the north those kind of costumes are just too cold lol
 

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I get what you're saying. I agree that extreme gore should be left for the movies or MAYBE professional haunted houses, but not for the typical haunter. To each his own, but personally I dont think that gore and fear are one and the same.
 

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It seems as though the "horror" fanatics and the "halloween" fanatics have been linked by association for life. I'm not a real horror fan but I love halloween, the creepy costumes and music, not the blood and gore. It's probably all Hollywoods fault. Geez, I'm a "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" fanatic and even that show got a little too gory for me at times. Of course it didn't stop me from watching the entire series....twice.
 

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Oak Lane Cemetery
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I think gore has it's place in a commercial haunt meant for teens and adults, but should be toned down some for home haunts and displays where small children will be present. Halloween is supposed to be scary/creepy but still fun for the little ones, not frightening to the point of them being in tears or giving them nightmares. I go for making little ones nervous and making older folks go "awesome!".
 

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nope, not for me either, i'm a old tradional horror fan, hate slasher or gore...I like the suspense, tension and surprise effects of childhood fears. my opinion is kids don't need this really gorey stuff to be used to as normal...jmo........a good prank goes way father than grossed out....................I got the lady in black from grandian road and she been all through my house now posing and has scared the hell out of everyone including myself when I forgot where I put her....shower stall, closet,around a door corner...lol doesn't take much.
 

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The Kitschiest Kitsch
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I like the eerie, haunting type stuff too, but I have a couple severed hands and the like in my collection. A little gore doesn't bother me. I don't like the props that are like a woman in her underwear and bra cut in half. That's just torture porn to me and I do find that very disturbing.
 

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All great posts. I think people are gonna do what they want, and if someone wants to do gory decorations, I don't have a problem.

But, I tend to really "LOVE" the spooky, the subtle, the atmospheric. Strange lighting and sound and creepiness, with the suggestion of horror, but not a lot of outright horror. That's my favorite. Atmosphere and subtlety. Cricket sound effects! A wolf howling in the distance. Simple stuff like that. But actually that simple stuff is harder to do...don't you think? It requires a lot more taste and sense of balance, I believe.

That's why I didn't much like the recent Batman movies. I like the threatening creepy "look" of a Batman movie, the eerily lit sets, the sense of menace. But when they got all nasty and violent, it was too much. I couldn't have fun with it, thought the new interpretation had become too dark. Even without being "gory" I thought the Batman films had become too unpleasant.
 

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Mad Monster Maker
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I have to agree. Blood and gore, if used in small doses to accentuate a particular haunt scene, may be effective in a haunt. But it seems Halloween gore props are being so overdone nowadays, it's almost cliche. It may be scary in a different context, but not for Halloween. For example, if I go into a haunt, and enter a room with arms and legs hanging from the ceiling, and an eviscerated corpse on a table, no big surprise, not scary. It's not unexpected in the least. However, if I'm at my neighbor's house for a labor day cookout, and I wander down into his basement and find that same scene, I'm getting outta there as fast as I can, calling the cops, and changing into unsoiled underwear. In the second context, it is completely unexpected, and WAAAY scary.

My personal take on this subject is that blood and gore are used in an attempt at shock value, and when your core audience has been so desensitized to gore, the shock value isn't there. It comes off as cheesy. Even in the movies, the scariest scenes don't rely on blood and gore. I'll cite two examples.

First, "Psycho" had the legendary shower scene. Ask anyone who's watched it if they actually see Janet Leigh being stabbed, and most people will say "yes", when in fact, the film never shows her being stabbed. Through great cinematography and multiple camera cuts, Hitchcock creates the illusion without ever actually showing it.

Second, from the original "Texas Chainsaw Massacre". The scene where Kirk is in the house to see if anyone is home, and suddenly the meat locker door slides open, Leatherface thuds him with the large mallet, then pulls him inside and slides the door closed. One of the scariest scenes ever.

And these two classic horror moments share one basic premise; they both give you just a few images suggesting something bad is gonna happen, and letting your imagination fill in the details. In "Psycho", we see a disjointed series of images, and our imagination fills in the blanks. In "Massacre" we only see Kirk being rendered unconscious and dragged into a meat locker. We have no idea exactly what's going to happen behind that closed door, but what we imagine is far scarier than anything they could put on film.

This is also why Michael Myers was so scary in the original "Halloween". John Carpenter gives you a scary backstory about Michael Myers' character, and when the character manifests itself on screen, it's simply a tall figure in coveralls wearing a white, featureless mask. Carpenter allowed the viewer's imagination to 'project', if you will, the scariest thing they could imagine onto that mask. Definitely much scarier than any blood or guts or gore that you could put in a movie.
 
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