Halloween Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm interested if anyone knows the true meaning of Halloween. Think way back, tell me as much as you know. It's a anthropology quest and this seems to be a great forum to find out what people know. Even if you don't know, I would like to know what you fell it is about. The other day I ran into one that disturbed me in which someone said it was the devil's holiday. Up until then I hadn't heard that one before, there must be others that are way off track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
314 Posts
It being a "devil's holiday" comes from the mostly Christian misunderstanding of Pagan beliefs. Halloween is derived from Samhain, the gaelic harvest festival and a time when one honors the dead. It was believed that the veil between the living world and the spirit world was much thinner that night, and we dress up to fool the spirits into thinking we are one of them. Irish immigrants brought the celebration to the US and it took off from there.

That's an extremely basic overview, there are a lot of elements to Halloween and how it came to be what it is today (including its meshing with All Hallows Day and a lot of other cultural influences) I consider myself fairly knowledgeable on the matter, but I'm sure there are users here who could even teach me a thing or two :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Haha, we kind of screwed that up in today's world....sexy maids, playboy bunnies and the Doppler effect( Big Bang...Sheldons costume). The spirits will not be fooled!

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
Haha, we kind of screwed that up in today's world....sexy maids, playboy bunnies and the Doppler effect( Big Bang...Sheldons costume). The spirits will not be fooled!
Haha, yeah. We kinda dropped the ball in recent years! As much as I think Halloween should be a scary holiday, I'm happy for people just to dress up. It's still about having fun, right? I always prefer wearing a spooky costume myself. But as long as people are celebrating it, one or two sexy maids (or Doppler Effects) is alright I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,805 Posts
Yeah i am with ichasiris , CrypticCuriosity has done a damn good job in a very few words , the celts were closely associated with some of the earliest known beliefs but it could have come from earlier than that , and the celts were known to use human sacrifices as well , and it was the celts who the Romans defeated also it has been found out more recently that across the border in Scotland some of the Halloween traditions were also practiced and so some of the Scottish immigrants also took similar Halloween traditions with them as well as the Irish to the states .
 

·
Wisp in the Mist
Joined
·
1,953 Posts
To add a little to CrypticCuriosity's post, the reason that you see a lot of divination themes this time of year, is because it's believed that it's easier to communicate with spirits, if you choose to (because the veil is thinner, as she mentioned).

There is also the tradition of the "Dumb Supper", in which celebrants make food for, and set the table for their deceased ancestors. They do not eat the food themselves. They leave it as an offering, much like the Mexican Day of the Dead tradition, although on a slightly larger scale, and within the home, rather than in a cemetery.

There was also a begging for treats of sorts, but it wasn't for candy. The Swedish also do this on Easter, and they decorate with witches at Easter. The children dress as witches, and go door to door. Similarly, there is the German tradition of Walpurgisnicht, which is May Eve, and they believe that witches gather on that day as well, and that the veil is also thinner at that time. From what I've read, they do not dress up for, or "beg" at Walpurgisnicht, but you will see a lot of witch related decoration and souvenirs if you're in the area of the Hartz mountains, especially.

Kinda got off track there, but I love those holidays, and they are "Halloweenish" to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
That was put in a nutshell very well, Cryptic Curiosity. And I got a laugh out of the video, kind of reminded me of the local news in southern California. I did a lot of research and come to find out it goes back to 13,000 years ago to the fire from the sky and the flood. Here are some extracts from the very well learned.

In European Calendars, the last day of October, and the first and second days of November, are designated as the festival of ‘All Halloween’, ‘All Saints’, and ‘All Souls’. Though they have hitherto never attracted any special attention, and have not been supposed to have been connected with each other, they originally constituted but one commemoration of three days’ duration, Known Among Almost All Nations as ‘The Festival of the Dead’, or the ‘Feast of Ancestors’. It is now, or was formerly, observed at or near the beginning of November by the Peruvians, the Hindoos, the Pacific Islanders, the people of the Tonga Islands, The Australians, the ancient Persians, the ancient Egyptians, and the Northern nations of Europe, and continued for three days among the Japanese, the Hindoos, the Australians, the ancient Romans, and the ancient Egyptians.

In the ancient calendar in India, the year commenced in the month of November, which bears the name ‘Cartiguey’, i.e., the ‘Pleiades’. In the ancient Egyptian Calendar the same resemblance can be traced between the name of the Pleiades, which among the Hebrews and Chaldeans is ‘Athor-aye’, with that of the Egyptian month of November, which is ‘Athor’, meaning ‘The Night’. The Arab name for the ‘Pleiades’, ‘Atauria’, also suggests a resemblance. In November, took place the Primeval Festival of the Dead, clad in a veil of Egyptian Mythology. The Isia, the solemn mourning for the God Osiris, ‘the Lord of Tombs’, lasted for three days, and began at Sunset, like the ‘Lemuria’ of the Romans, and the Festival of the Dead among the Persians and other nations. The singular custom of counting the day from the Sunset of the preceding day, or the Nocturnal System, was so universal, that many consider it proof of the unity of origin of our race. The Bible tells us “the evening and the morning were the first day” (Genesis 1 : 5). The Babylonians also started their days at Sunset. But the first day of our Festival of the Dead, is a still stronger illustration, as it is called Halloweve.

The Indigenous Australians also consecrate Three Days to the Memory of the Dead, as a Vernal New Year’s Celebration, regulated by the time-honoured Pleiades at the end of October, in which they paint a white stripe over their arms, legs, and ribs, they appear, as they dance by the Fires at night, like so many Skeletons Rejoicing.

In Mexico, we find that ‘The Great Festival’ of the Mexican cycle was held on the 17th of November, and was regulated by the Pleiades. It began at Sunset ; and at Midnight as that Constellation approached the Zenith, a human victim was offered up to Avert the Dread Calamity which they believed impended over the human race. They had a Tradition that at the time the World had been previously Destroyed ; and they dreaded lest a similar Catastrophe would, at the end of a cycle, Annihilate the human race.

In our calendar November 1st is still marked All Saints’ Day, and in the pre-Reformation calendars the last day of October was marked All Hallow Eve, and the 2nd of November All Souls’, clearly marking a Three-Days’ Festival of the Dead, commencing in the evening and regulated by the Pleiades. Hence also the Hallowe’en torches of the Irish, the Bonfires of the Scotch, the coel-coeth Fires of the Welsh, and the tindle Fire of Cornwall, all lighted in Hallowe’en. To this day, in France, the people repair to the cemeteries and lunch at the graves of their ancestors.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top