Halloween Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If someone could direct me to a thread already discussing this, please do so. I couldn't find one.

Last year I had been driving around and saw a majestic four story yellow house that placed an orange spotlight in front so it shot up a brilliant beam against the front of it, from ground to roof. It looked splendid and really added to the Autumn mood.

I'm looking for examples of spotlights on the outside of homes - not ones that just light up props, but ones shone on the homes themselves so maybe I can get an idea of how I might arrange some on mine.

I already purchased a Gemmy fire & ice spotlight, but as far as I know that's not strong enough to really light up a house, so I was going to put that against a shed on our property. So for the front of my house, I'm talking about something more brilliant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
For instance, I found this random image on Google:

House Home Property Lighting Light


What kind of spotlight did they likely use, and how many to light up that particular house? It's not what I described in my original post (they had only one spotlight highlighting the front of their tall, majestic house), but the effect in this picture would look better on my house since it's only a two story.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
It appears to be two green cfl bulbs in the porch light and one in the upper window. And two standard green spotlights on the front. The clamp style light sockets could be used, or if you need them to be a bit more weather proof, you can make a can light from large coffe cans or industrial sized food cans.

Warning: The cans will get hot when running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It appears to be two green cfl bulbs in the porch light and one in the upper window. And two standard green spotlights on the front. The clamp style light sockets could be used, or if you need them to be a bit more weather proof, you can make a can light from large coffe cans or industrial sized food cans.

Warning: The cans will get hot when running.
That sounds a little dangerous as I'd want to run the lights all night long. Is there any alternative? Or am I being impractical about running them all night?

What you are describing sounds a lot like a colored landscape flood light. Using spots in the same fashion will result in hot spots and non-uniform light distribution which may not be what you are after.
By hot spots, do you mean streaks? On the one example I gave, the beam was one long streak with of course some ambient light on either side, which looked great but it won't on my style of house. I guess I'd have to go with a few spotlights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
If your looking to run them all night, look into led style spot or flood lights. They run much cooler and quite a few are rated for outdoor use. I don't leave mine on all night and just for the particular season, so it is a non issue. When I say hot, they will get as hot as the bulb. LEDs still get warm, but nothing near like and incandescent bulb. If your looking for something to use year round, go with professional landscape lighting ( as mentioned by setarcos), but if it's seasonal, LEDs or home made get the job done.

By the way, hot spots, when referring to lighting, will be a brighter spot where the light hits. Like a flashlight shining on a wall. Hot spot in the center and the rest of the light fading out from center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Thanks for the additional clarifications Icepick!.

FYI: two other lighting industry terms that may help refine what you are looking for (just do a Google Image search to see what they mean): "Uplighting" and "wall washer".

I second the recommendation of using LEDs. They are significantly more efficient than incandescent bulbs, and have a longer life. There are even RGB versions that allow you to select the color. To get a decent amount of light coverage outdoors, you probably want to look at fixtures using 10W LEDs (or higher). There are many low cost options for LED fixtures. Just be warned that many of these are not UL listed, and the construction quality is shoddy at best (for example many manufacturers fail to connect the ground lead inside the housing for their AC-powered fixtures which is a big safety no-no)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
668 Posts
Thanks for the additional clarifications Icepick!.

FYI: two other lighting industry terms that may help refine what you are looking for (just do a Google Image search to see what they mean): "Uplighting" and "wall washer".

I second the recommendation of using LEDs. They are significantly more efficient than incandescent bulbs, and have a longer life. There are even RGB versions that allow you to select the color. To get a decent amount of light coverage outdoors, you probably want to look at fixtures using 10W LEDs (or higher). There are many low cost options for LED fixtures. Just be warned that many of these are not UL listed, and the construction quality is shoddy at best (for example many manufacturers fail to connect the ground lead inside the housing for their AC-powered fixtures which is a big safety no-no)
Only reason I mentioned anything with incandescents is that I still have some that have lasted years. I assumed a lot more people still have them kicking around. If not then led is the way to go. If my incandescents ever die they will be replaced with led. They may cost a bit more upfront, but the power savings and lifespan more than make up for it. I went nuts last year for Christmas clearance items to replace most all of my incandescent strings. Spent about $400 @ 50% off items. Even got some orange and green to maybe use for Halloween.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
FYI: two other lighting industry terms that may help refine what you are looking for (just do a Google Image search to see what they mean): "Uplighting" and "wall washer".

I second the recommendation of using LEDs. They are significantly more efficient than incandescent bulbs, and have a longer life. There are even RGB versions that allow you to select the color. To get a decent amount of light coverage outdoors, you probably want to look at fixtures using 10W LEDs (or higher). There are many low cost options for LED fixtures. Just be warned that many of these are not UL listed, and the construction quality is shoddy at best (for example many manufacturers fail to connect the ground lead inside the housing for their AC-powered fixtures which is a big safety no-no)
Ahh, looks like "uplighting" it is then. When I think I've located some fixtures that might work for me, I'll post them for your opinions. Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
So, I know this is not exactly what you were asking, but you mentioned that you had a fire & ice spotlight & didn't think it would light up your entire house. We have one of those similar spotlights from Lowe's, and we use it to illuminate about half of our house and we position it in such a way that it casts a witch silhouette shadow.

Lighting Light Violet Purple Tree


Home Lighting House Light Night


I think it actually covers a pretty good bit of the house, for just one spotlight. If we positioned it more in the middle of our yard, we'd probably be able to light up more than just half the house, but of course we're trying to highlight that silhouette. Just thought I'd share so that you have a better idea of how the fire & ice spotlight could work for you.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So, I know this is not exactly what you were asking, but you mentioned that you had a fire & ice spotlight & didn't think it would light up your entire house. We have one of those similar spotlights from Lowe's, and we use it to illuminate about half of our house and we position it in such a way that it casts a witch silhouette shadow.
I'm so glad you posted this. I saw a witches with a cauldron silhouette somewhere and had been tempted to get it, this will be my excuse to do so. I have a typical cape style New England home and there is a long rectangle addition on the back, so the one side of the home is very long, and this would look great against it. Now to get my husband to move five cords of wood where the spotlight would sit. :D

I sat up last night for a good while looking for outdoor spotlights and felt defeated. All the ones that I thought would work either seemed too complicated for me as they required some kind of additional thing to hook them into, or they got really bad reviews. I think I still want some kind of spotlights for the front of my house and I'll just keep checking back here to look for recommendations, but you have given me a great idea for the long side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
We had just been using the LED spot lights from spirit halloween.

They actually worked pretty good. I will try to find a picture!
I look forward to seeing it! That's a big help when one doesn't know what they're doing. I was in Lowe's the other day and they had a nice display with each type of light on which demonstrated the strength of each and I understood it better.

Make it simple and go with Minions Web. I have purchased LED bulbs from Minions and have never been disappointed. Go with either the 10W Floods or the 72 or 120 spots for uplighting. If going with the spots make certain the fixtures you use are weatherproofed.

http://www.minionsweb.com/osStore/l....html?osCsid=a001077c0bc8a1c33484d0d8cc64f2d2

http://www.minionsweb.com/osStore/led-outdoor-spotlight-bulbs-c-75.html
I will take a look at that. Thank you! Surely I will have a wonderful display this year with everyone's help. Plus I'll be able to see what my dogs are doing in the back yard when I let them out at night.
 

·
Here to burgle your turts
Joined
·
2,305 Posts
I was actually really kind of stunned by the fire & ice type lights we got last year. They seemed to have a REALLY big "throw" (I think that's the term) although maybe the intensity might not be what you're looking for. I know I actually placed props in the way of our lights last year to act as blinders as they were casting light on the neighbours houses as well.

Here's a link to a lighting tutorial you may find handy...I think it gets posted by someone every year. Depends on the effect your going for but it's got some great examples of light placement and using contrasting warm and cool colours.

http://robertdbrown.com/2014/01/26/skullandbone-com-haunt-lighting-tutorial/

Finally, whenever I have problems finding stuff here, I use the google search engine. Type in...

site:halloweenforum.com lighting

and any other search terms you might have (separated with spaces in between each added word) and you should get a ton of results. Then you can use the search tools to restrict by date, or if you want just click on the images tab for visual inspiration. Hope this helps.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top