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Prince of Arkham Asylum
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The maker of this video, and I assume the arch is on this board as well, btw. @Oak Lane Cemetery!
 
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I followed the tutorial and made one. Here are a few thoughts on my experience.

1. Figure out a substantial base before you start. I used 3/4" pvc slipped over rebar pounded into the ground and it was not enough. I also made mine with 2 uprights and a middle connector but my planning didn't work out great. Mine was top heavy and I had to keep tieing it up to a tree that was luckly above it. Last year I just used them as creepy trees.

2. Start with a lot of pool noodles! Probably best to buy a whole box from the dollar store and supplement with some other sizes. Darker colors would be easier to paint. I wish my arch was twice what it is.

3. It took way more spray paint to cover it than I planned. Again - neon green is a hard color to cover, even with several layers of melted shrink wrap.

4. A large roll of shrink wrap stolen from work and hung from the ceiling is awesome!

5. Expanding foam can definitely help to make things more solid. Allen Hopps of Stiltbeast Studios has some great YouTube videos of sculpting the loctite brand foam and its very fun and versatile.




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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I followed the tutorial and made one. Here are a few thoughts on my experience.

1. Figure out a substantial base before you start. I used 3/4" pvc slipped over rebar pounded into the ground and it was not enough. I also made mine with 2 uprights and a middle connector but my planning didn't work out great. Mine was top heavy and I had to keep tieing it up to a tree that was luckly above it. Last year I just used them as creepy trees.

2. Start with a lot of pool noodles! Probably best to buy a whole box from the dollar store and supplement with some other sizes. Darker colors would be easier to paint. I wish my arch was twice what it is.

3. It took way more spray paint to cover it than I planned. Again - neon green is a hard color to cover, even with several layers of melted shrink wrap.

4. A large roll of shrink wrap stolen from work and hung from the ceiling is awesome!

5. Expanding foam can definitely help to make things more solid. Allen Hopps of Stiltbeast Studios has some great YouTube videos of sculpting the loctite brand foam and its very fun and versatile.




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Thank you for the help. I like yours. I'm off to buy a lot of pool noodles.😊
 

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Prop Building
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This is a tip for everyone working with pool noodles. You can find the same material (Closed Cell Foam) used in pool noodles in a product called "Backer Rod" it's used in concrete forms and insulation purposes. You may have to go chase up a local supplier for the stuff, but the best thing about it, is most of the time it comes in grey, which makes painting way easier. It also is not hollow in the centre, comes in a TON of alternate sizes as well from 1/2" all the way up to 4".
 

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Oak Lane Cemetery
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Someone say vine arch? lol. Original maker here. One thing I can say for sure is that you will be repainting it every year if you paint it like I did. The spray paint for plastics DOES NOT stick to stretch wrap well. I tried undercoating spray paint in 2019 and it failed as well, but not as badly. Turned out that the stretch wrap fim is just too slick and stretchy for paint to adhere to very well. Getting ready to repaint the entire thing for 2021 and I'm going to base coat it with latex carpet adhesive this time and see if that does not do away with the peeling. Start on it now if you are going to make one. Took me 3-4 months of days off to make.
 

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That arch was stellar the first time I saw it and I stand by that! As I recall, someone stole Oak Lane Cemetery’s design, slapped glitter all over a cheap imitation and sold it in the big box stores. Obviously the stores had no clue it was stolen so not their fault. This has happened to several beautiful creations here sadly.
 

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Someone say vine arch? lol. Original maker here. One thing I can say for sure is that you will be repainting it every year if you paint it like I did. The spray paint for plastics DOES NOT stick to stretch wrap well. I tried undercoating spray paint in 2019 and it failed as well, but not as badly. Turned out that the stretch wrap fim is just too slick and stretchy for paint to adhere to very well. Getting ready to repaint the entire thing for 2021 and I'm going to base coat it with latex carpet adhesive this time and see if that does not do away with the peeling. Start on it now if you are going to make one. Took me 3-4 months of days off to make.
'don't forget to wrap your noodle'. LOL. Such a memorable line from these videos!!!!
 

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[/QUOTE]I'm going to base coat it with latex carpet adhesive this time and see if that does not do away with the peeling.[/QUOTE]


I've seen Allen at stiltbeast studios use super 77 as a primer coat and I thought I might try some next year. After a month in the yard, last year I had to do a bit a touch up the night b4 Halloween. I change my theme every year, so I don't mind repainting and redesigning.

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The creator is indeed a member. I’m sure if you have questions he’d be willing to answer them. He is a nice man. Ah, scrolled up and saw you waves
 

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I know Oak Lane Cemetery mentioned it in passing, but I have chatted with him about the nature of pool noodles in another part of the forum, and I really think it needs to be emphasized that what you see before you is NOT an easy, day project. Go into this with eyes open. It can be done. It looks amazing. BUT, it is a major project that requires much patience, swearing, and readjusting to pull it off.

Often the amazing things we see here at Halloween Forum are made by talented artists who have skill sets most beginners don't. That doesn't mean that beginners can't create the prop. It just means that expecting it to all come together as easily as the tutorial seems is probably not going to happen. (Most of the time, thanks to editing, you don't actually see the frustrating parts show up in any tutorial.) It's a bit like sewing. I can watch a professional whip out a pair of pants from pattern to finished in an hour and think that it looks fun. Two days later, I'm still trying to figure out how the pocket got put in backward and why my hems aren't lining up. Eventually, my pants look pretty good, and I'm proud enough of them to wear them in public, but that learning curve wasn't something I factored into the mix. Professionals have already paid their dues to get to the place where they impress us by how easy they make things seem.

So, welcome to the Forum, Spooky Girl 73, and the wonderful world of Halloween prop making. It really is a great deal of fun, but it helps as a beginner if you're patient and know that the more you build, the easier and better your final horrors are likely to be.
 
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