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Discussion Starter #1
I know prob. nobody else on here would have my problem, but the solution has other benefits as well.
I eliminated almost all compressor noise by putting it inside a small old former ticket booth, which has some insulation in it's construction (But the compressor could still be heard)
The Winter has been very cold this year already and compressors are not to be run in such low temps. "Ruination" could happen.
I built a 2 by 2 wooden frame around the compressor, stapled chicken wire on the outside of the frame, then cut 2 inch styrofoam insulation board panels to fit together on the outside of the frame, then draped thick fiberglass "Batts" over the top and down 2 sides . I then carefully hung a heat lamp with a 150 watt bulb in it pointed straight down .
Yesterday it was below zero in the AM. Using an infared heat sensing gun, it said the air temp inside this little building was 6 degrees but inside the insulated box it was 22 degrees. Last night I placed my hand on the cast steel of the compressor and it was very nice and warm to my touch!
The compressor is a small oil-in-the -crankcase model (China) which will probably last longer than the air-cooled ones I kept replacing every year or three.
The extra bonus is now I have to really strain my ears to hear any compressor sound at all in the first room of the house where the people do often spend quite an amount of time , as I often tell them the actual ghost stories of this old house ,which never ever needed a compressor making noises for a backround-effect.
Yes, we are open almost every night of the entire year, hence the need for a compressor in the Winter.
I should have done this many years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just checked temperatures a minute ago. Outside temp. 3 degrees inside the old ticket booth (wall) 3 degrees, inside the insulated box, the air compressor head/metal = 35 degrees! " Yeah!"
 
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