Halloween Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
AKA - S.M. Barrett
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've only just recently come across references to this stuff while researching paper mache clay, and I found one or two links that led me back here, so I thought I'd ask--

How many of you use "Sculpt or Coat"?

Foam Coatings, Clear coats, Primers, Saturated Paints, Scenic Brushes by Sculptural Arts Coating, Inc.

How do you as a haunter use it? Have you figured out any interesting tricks or techniques with it? Do you use it with other materials aside from paper mache or paper clay?
Got any suggestions, or examples of work to show?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,787 Posts
Ah, yes, this stuff.

I had ordered a quart 2 years ago for a paper mache test. Made a little skull out of it, I keep meaning to pull that bugger out and do some tests to see just how waterproof it actually is...now which box is it in....
 

·
Hauntless
Joined
·
8,374 Posts
I used Sculpt or Coat as the final seal before Terra's paint job. To me it seemed to act as glue coat to keep the final layer of Paperclay and DAS clay as a solid unit. It's hard to explain but I made her body out of Celluclay and then 'skinned' her with Paperclay (face) and DAS clay (body). I was a little concerned that, in time, her skin would crack or separate from the dried Celluclay underneath. With several coats of the Sculpt or Coat, I have no concerns now. Even if it cracked the Sculpt or Coat would hold it together and I probably wouldn't even know there was a problem.

Now, I learned a hard lesson about using Sculpt or Coat. I put it on full strength. Well, it has the consistency of whipped butter and it left seriously deep brush strokes after it dried. I should have thinned it down first. You cannot sand it. It just balls up on the sandpaper. Like I said, it was a tough lesson.

I got a booklet that shows how you can use it for many other things. Mainly you can dip cloth in it and use for textual effects. Basically just like monster mud. Personally I would use monster mud because it's much cheaper. But, the Sculpt or Coat would make a much stronger bond.

It can also be used as a protecting coat over carved foam projects. Much like I use Drylok but I don't think it has the waterproof capabilities as Drylok has.

Here's a picture of Terra with her coat of Sculpt or Coat and is now ready for painting:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
I just used Sculpt or Coat as one of my final layers on a new Bride of Frankenstein prop and as a protective coat since she will be outside with Frankenstein and it should provide a nice hard protective coat to keep out the elements.

Bride of Frankenstein picture by Coldshivers - Photobucket


Terra has the other uses listed which it can be used for. I had the same problem with brush strokes until I thinned it a bit so I can back up that lessons learned!

Terra, btw...awesome prop!
 

·
AKA - S.M. Barrett
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Hi, Terra, I'm a big fan.

Considered stalking, but figured "Nah, she's probably busy." Still interested in the whole eat-your-brain, gain-your-knowledge thing.

Anyway, I've read references to thinning the stuff, but do you have a ratio estimate? I noticed that Grim Visions uses thinned Sculpt or Coat, as he says here...

Smoothing Mache Clay – Grimvisions

I'm wondering if Creative Paperclay and exterior latex paint might not be enough. Sculpt or Coat is gonna have to really bring a lot to the table if A.) it shows brushmarks - bad for a coating product, and B.) It cost over 25 bucks for a quart.
I'm really interested in the stuff, but I need to be sold, ya know?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Spats, I'm not sure how much Terra used for her prop but I bought a quart for my BoF (for her head, arms, hands, & chest) and easily could have gotten by with just a pint. Unfortunetly though I do not recall any thinning ratio, I just kept mixing and testing until there were no brush lines.
 

·
Hauntless
Joined
·
8,374 Posts
Hi, Terra, I'm a big fan.

Considered stalking, but figured "Nah, she's probably busy." Still interested in the whole eat-your-brain, gain-your-knowledge thing.

Anyway, I've read references to thinning the stuff, but do you have a ratio estimate? I noticed that Grim Visions uses thinned Sculpt or Coat, as he says here...

Smoothing Mache Clay – Grimvisions

I'm wondering if Creative Paperclay and exterior latex paint might not be enough. Sculpt or Coat is gonna have to really bring a lot to the table if A.) it shows brushmarks - bad for a coating product, and B.) It cost over 25 bucks for a quart.
I'm really interested in the stuff, but I need to be sold, ya know?
LOL! :p Feel free to ask me any questions. I don't watch TV at night while the hubby does so I hang around here.

In regards to the ratio, I don't have one but I only thinned it down just to the point of smoothness. On the label it says that if you thin it too much, it will lose many of the qualities you bought it for.

In regards to selling you on it. That's a tough one. I can't imagine a substitute for what I used it for (I think for all of Terra I used probably a quart myself - perhaps less) so no need to get a gallon. For the other uses, I'd rather use mm and Drylok because they are cheaper and I have it already on hand. I would say, if the piece is important to you, get a quart just to try it out. I know it's about $25 but it is pretty neat stuff. It says it can also be used as a glue.

You may also want to ask LaurieBeast (perhaps she'll also see this thread), she uses it for all her pieces. I don't think there is another substitute for what we used it for.
 

·
AKA - S.M. Barrett
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Haunted, Terra, thanks for the heads up.

Sounds like Magic-Sculpt - ya need to get your hands on it to see it perform, i.e., how much thinning it needs. I did locate an FAQ about it at sculpturalarts.com, but I'm curious about that booklet you mentioned, Terra.

Haunted, looks likes try as you go is standard for the stuff, like you mentioned. The FAQ even mentioned misting the stuff after during application, as well as using trowels and knives for smoothing.

Hope LaurieBeast notices this. I'm dying to hear what else could be done with this stuff.
 

·
Hauntless
Joined
·
8,374 Posts
If she misses this post, I think it would be okay if you leave a note at her profile. It's been really busy here lately and I'm missing lots of threads.

I got the pamphlet that the makers of Sculpt or Coat offers. I got lots of good ideas from it on how to make scenic props. It's focused on set design for playhouses but many of the ideas can easily be transferred to what we do. But, I don't think I'll be using Sculpt or Coat for what they are using it for. I'd be broke! They use that stuff like they didn't pay for it :D But, I could use the Drylok or mm for many of the projects they were advocating. The spiral-bound booklet is called: Creating Scenic Elements with Sculptural Arts Coatings
 

·
Sculptress of Scare
Joined
·
2,768 Posts
Hiya Spats, I'm a huge fan of this product. It's kind of like putting on a layer of liquid plastic and does a great job of sealing whatever you apply it to. It also goes a long way when diluted. I think that mixing it well is more important than the dilution ratio. Just add a little bit of water and stir well, brush it on something to see if you get any brush strokes when it dries which doesnt take long, and go from there. Another use for it, which I haven't tried yet, is to mix it with sand or dirt to get texture. The one drawback I've seen is that it dries shiny. That's why I don't use it as a final topcoat. I use Flat Plastic Varnish for that which can be purchased at the same place. I also use their Tough n White Primer. Between those three products, I know my sculpts are very well protected.
 

·
AKA - S.M. Barrett
Joined
·
1,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
That you can mix stuff in is cool, though for a rocky or sandy texture I'd use Dry-lok. What I'm wondering is, what other materials could you add?
The mind reels.

I'm gonna try it on a project or two this year, nothing over a square foot in size, with Creative paperclay.

Thank you all for the details.
 

·
Hauntless
Joined
·
8,374 Posts
Flipping through the booklet there are a bunch of things that you could mix into Sculpt or Coat. Now, you could throw in the same stuff into monster mud but I would guess that if you needed a stronger bond then the Sculpt or Coat would be the way to go. Here's some ideas:

glitter
sand
leaves
paper
pine needles
mulch
bark
Spanish moss
tall dried grass
fabric pieces
sawdust
webbing
cotton
rope threads
pebbles
polyester batting
aquarium rock


Here's some other recipes they suggest:

Sculpt or Coat's version of Monster Mud: 1 part Sculpt or Coat to 2 parts joint compound. They also recommend 1 part Sculpt or Coat to 3 parts joint compound. I guess it depends on how thick you'd like it.

Another Sculpt or Coat version of monster mud: 1 part Sculpt or Coat, 1 part joint compound, 1/2 part latex paint.

Colored: 1 part paint to 2 parts Sculpt or Coat

Stone texture: 1 part Sculpt or Coat, 2 parts joint compound, 1 part cellulose, 1/2 part water, 1/4 part gray paint, 1/4 part brown paint

Brick texture: 1/2 part Sculpt or Coat, 1 part dark red paint, 1 part burnt sienna paint, 1 part water, 2 parts joint compound, 1 part Cellulose



Here's another neat idea. Take a decorator's stencil and put it on a surface and trowel on the Sculpt or Coat and remove stencil. Let dry and it will give a raised surface.

Many times they also will roll on the Sculpt or Coat onto fabric backdrops and throw in the textures onto it when it's still wet. They then use it as wall backdrops or even floor coverings. Kind of neat :)
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top