Halloween Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

Registered
Joined
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Checking to see who has the best method for making stuff look rusty (cauldrons, pvc cemetery fencing, etc.). I am interested in how you get the right texture, what color(s) you use, any tips at all. And you get extra credit for posting pics...thanks.
 

Registered
Joined
239 Posts
i have no pics ( 馃槷 ), but i have done it using textured spray paint in a dark red as a base and then using reds and browns in a drybrush, with a suuuuper light drybrushing of metallic copper as a last step.

it looked pretty cool because the overspray of the spray paint made it look like the rust was creeping.
 

Registered
Joined
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
i have no pics ( �� ), but i have done it using textured spray paint in a dark red as a base and then using reds and browns in a drybrush, with a suuuuper light drybrushing of metallic copper as a last step.

it looked pretty cool because the overspray of the spray paint made it look like the rust was creeping.
Thanks, would love to see that...
 

Registered
Joined
70 Posts
Pics later for the extra credit!

I use brake shavings from my local auto repair shop. Any shop that turns brake drums and rotors has buckets full of shavings from the brake lathe. Ask the shop manager and they're usually happy to help. Bring a large ziploc and a pair of rubber gloves for the guys to put your shavings in.

I apply a base coat of paint - usually black - then toss on a handful of metal shavings. Once it's dry you can mist it with vinegar or water. My graveyard fence sat out n the rain last week and it looks excellent. Nice and rusty looking because it's real rust.

There are a couple of caveats to using the filings. If you do it right it's messy. You're sprinkling/throwing handfuls of metal filings onto a prop. Do it on your lawn or somewhere you can make a mess. The filings are sharp and will leave a rough surface. Always wear rubber gloves when working with them. Any glove with texture will pick up the filings. The prop will have a texture like 80 grit sandpaper. For fences and such that shouldn't be an issue. Be mindful of props that will get brushed against a lot.

The filings work great and have a natural rust texture and color. If it's real rust you want, get real rust!
 

Registered
Joined
60 Posts
I haven't done it myself but you can actually buy packages of cosmetic rust that you toss onto either fresh paint or an adhesive spray. Personally, I think you could get away powdered red clay instead of buying the cosmetic rust if you want a sprinkling of rust. For a bubbling under the paint rust, I think yoboseiyo's technique of textured paint or even truck bed liner with a dusting of paint/dry brushing.
 

Registered
Joined
862 Posts
It really depends on how close people will get to the rusted item. If it's more than just a few feet away, we don't worry about trying to make it look textured and just use spray paint. I don't use the textured paints because they've not held up well in our wet environment. Things in our haunt that are rusted often stay out most of the month, so we use a paint and primer in one, generally Rustoleum's stuff.

rust01.jpg

We use traditional black paint, red primer, and some other lighter orange colors like Paprika or something similar. A light finger on the button, not pushing all the way down, will cause the paint to come out in splatters instead of a fine mist. We basically use the can in the wrong way to get the effect of rusting metal. We just keep layering the paint until we get the look we want.

You'll notice for items that are distant from the viewer, we're not really concerned about the rust having depth or texture; just the overall look of rust.

rust03.jpg

For larger items, like our cauldron, we used Great Stuff to create a visual texture to the cauldron that allows for shadows. It's way over the top, but from a distance, anything smaller seemed to get lost. Using gloves, we take the foam and smear it all over whatever we're "rusting". Great Foam for Windows seems to work the best as it doesn't swell up as much as the others. But smear it good and flat all over. It won't look like much when you start, but in a few minutes, you'll see the change as it expands. Fight the urge to leave globs of the stuff on because they'll swell up too large and look much too smooth. Our first try at it left our cauldron looking more like it had tumors than rust. :)

rust02.jpg

We use the same painting technique as above to get the overall look nice and rusty, but eventually we'll go in with some dry brushing of rusty colored acrylic paints and washes of black and oranges to look like spills over the years. But for now, it looks passable to us and we have more pressing projects on the burner. :)

Hope that helps.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top