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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!!!!

I am currently building a faux stone wall out of 8'x4' foam. The problem is I had to cut it in half to get it in my car to bring home, yet my wall is going to be the full 8' high.

I've been experimenting a bit with ways to attach them back together, and most of them have resulted in wobbly insecure mess.

Anyone have any good tips for securing foam for easy assembly/disassembly? I would like to avoid glue to make storing it easier as well.
 

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I find that Great Stuff is the best way to glue foam. You will have to keep pressure on it in this case as it will expand and push the foam apart. Being neat is hard, if it starts to ooze out of the cracks. Taking some wax paper or wrap and pressing it down hard will reduce the expansion, by removing some of the air. You can even cut it and sand it. Just be advised if you have never used it... it will not hold paint the same as the main foam and I can always find it. Neat and judicious will help prevent that.
 

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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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I find that Great Stuff is the best way to glue foam. You will have to keep pressure on it in this case as it will expand and push the foam apart. Being neat is hard, if it starts to ooze out of the cracks. Taking some wax paper or wrap and pressing it down hard will reduce the expansion, by removing some of the air. You can even cut it and sand it. Just be advised if you have never used it... it will not hold paint the same as the main foam and I can always find it. Neat and judicious will help prevent that.
Be aware that Great Stuff is actually made for usage as an expanding insulation to fill cracks and crevasses; it is very sticky and will permanently bond with things you don't want it to bond with - so wear old clothes, work outside in the grass or on a disposable tarp, wear gloves and keep hair tied back out of the way. I learned the hard way that it take a VERY long time to come off of skin. :p

I honestly wouldn't recommend using this for what the OP was asking about since it is more for filling in and gluing up large structures, not sheets to make a relatively smooth surface.

I would go with the wood frame and use screws/washers (at least that is what I do, I use large washers to provide a larger surface area to grab the foam) to attach the foam to the wood like DeadED suggested. Makes it that much easier to just disassemble too.

Oh! And duct tape. I use duct tape entirely too much in my builds, but I like it, and you could literally just tape the foam to the backside of the wood frame and then throw a few screw/washer things into it to provide a bit more stability. But that is definitely not the smartest construction tip (I'm a "creative" builder!)
 

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My props are based on 1x2 furring strips. It may take some digging through the pile at home depot to find straight ones but they are there. A basic frame of 1x2 with a small triangle to reinforce the corners works great. With a Pnu brad gun/stapler you can put one together in just a couple of minutes. Then screw with washers as described. However, I take one more step and put the screw below surface level and use Gorilla glue or similar to go over the top to fill in the hole. This is very similar chemically to the great stuff but less "air" and controllable since its not in a pressure can but a bottle you squirt. A little of the same glue on the back and it's never coming off.
 

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In my opinion, the best way to put it back together would be to get some dowel rods and use them as pins. Drill a hole every foot and glue in a dowel rod. Make sure you have a corresponding hole in the other piece of foam. Lay down a line of liquid nail and put the pieces together.

The dowel will act as pins to support the joint. It is a very common technique in miniature model making, there is no reason that you cannot use it for this. I have a few tombstones that are using bamboo skewers as pins for some of the decorative elements that didn't stay on with just glue.
 

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It's by no means pretty but it did the trick. The wind ripped my display in two. I took long screws and screwed the corners together. I then splinted the crack with a ton of skewers and duck tape.

I tried inserting the skewers into the two pieces and attaching them but it didn't provide the support I needed. Splinting and screws did the trick. Then I carved the cracks to hide the separations.

Finger Hand Vehicle door Material property Nail
Text Wall Font Room Wood
Text Illustration Headstone Stele Art
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is very similar to what I wound up doing myself. Duct tape + splinting, I used free paint stirring sticks.

I originally tried inserting them into the foam, but the foam was not stiff enough to support that and everything was wobbly. Splinting on the backside worked great, though is very ugly.

Here is the result. I made a stone archway to my office at work and reused some tombstones from the previous year. Came out pretty decent.

Architecture Black-and-white Font Design Room
 
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