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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I apologize if this question has been asked before. Anyways I am making a large paper mache cauldron as well as making the heads and hands of my witches out of paper mache and I will be making another spider also out of paper mache. So how do I seal them to make them waterproof?

I was thinking of using that Flex Seal type stuff on the cauldron, but that stuff is pretty expensive and I really don't know how well it would hold up. Then I thought about using a marine grade polyurethane. Then I started seeing people mentioning DryLoc. Has anyone used it to help waterproof their paper mached items? If so, I assume it was used as a base coat. Did you use any other type of sealer after your project was painted? I thought about thinning down some latex caulk with some paint mixed in to paint my witch heads and hands. Would that be enough to waterproof the mache?

I sure would appreciate any help on this. I would hate for all the work I have put into these props be lost due to not properly waterproofing them.

P.s. my witch heads are made with Styrofoam wig heads and not all of wig heads are covered with paper mache. The backside of the head is still just the foam. So I can't use anything that would melt the foam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't have any mache props but I would think a good water based poly should work nicely and won't hurt the foam.
Thanks J-Man. I didn't think about a water based poly. I forget that stuff exists. I usually use the oil based, but that is because I am doing stuff with wood.
 

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I always use dry-loc. Here in ohio we have a mixed bag of weather. I paper mached the pumpkin head in this pic. I used dry-loc on the paper mache, inside and outside of the head (make sure to get every crack and crevice covered with dry-lok). Then i painted with acrylic paint. Finally, i used a clear spray sealant. I leave my props out the entire month of October....it has held up through many many downpours. Good luck with your project!! Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I always use dry-loc. Here in ohio we have a mixed bag of weather. I paper mached the pumpkin head in this pic. I used dry-loc on the paper mache, inside and outside of the head (make sure to get every crack and crevice covered with dry-lok). Then i painted with acrylic paint. Finally, i used a clear spray sealant. I leave my props out the entire month of October....it has held up through many many downpours. Good luck with your project!! Hope this helps!
Thanks Zombie4, That is good to know that dryloc will work. My last spider I made I just used spray paint to seal it and it held up for a while. I did have to make a few repairs here and there at the end of the first season, by the end of the second season, it was beyond a few minor repairs. Maybe if I use Dryloc as the base coat and then exterior paint as the top coat and then seal with a poly my props will last longer than a couple of seasons.
 

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Last season I made 3 giant paper mache pumpkins that sat out for the month of October in a lot of rain and they made it through fine. After I painted them, I put on a couple coats of Cabot Spar Varnish. Thanks to the EPA I found it was impossible to find local on the shelf. Fortunately there is Amazon! It's available in Satin or Gloss. Gourd Pumpkin Plant Vegetable Cucurbita Pumpkin Calabaza Winter squash Cucurbita Vegetable
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Last season I made 3 giant paper mache pumpkins that sat out for the month of October in a lot of rain and they made it through fine. After I painted them, I put on a couple coats of Cabot Spar Varnish. Thanks to the EPA I found it was impossible to find local on the shelf. Fortunately there is Amazon! It's available in Satin or Gloss. View attachment 420250 View attachment 420258
Thanks for the info slcjeeper. After comparing the difference between varnish and poly, it sounds as if the varnish would be the better choice as a top coat finish. I guess I never thought of there being a difference between the two. I thought they were pretty much the same thing. Nice pumpkins BTW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I made mine with monster mud sealed it with drylok then spray painted black
eightcircuits, could I still use monster mud on my project even though it is nearly done? I didn't learn of monster mud until I was almost done with my cauldron. What recipe do you use for monster mud?
 

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I'm a dedicated Flex Seal guy. :) Our Dog Soldiers werewolf was the first figure we used it on, and you would never know that under that Flex Seal interior is fiberglass, vinyl, foam, clay, and even packing tape. The rubber seals and covers and gives everything a uniform texture, which is awesome. What is also awesome is Flex Seal also seals moisture in. The abdominal muscle under the rib cage is made of clay, and we were afraid it would crack once it dried, so we waited until it was about half dry and then shot it with the Flex Seal. That was three years ago, and you can still feel a but of give to the clay if you press hard, so the Flex Seal has prevented the clay from fully drying. :)

 

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eightcircuits, could I still use monster mud on my project even though it is nearly done? I didn't learn of monster mud until I was almost done with my cauldron. What recipe do you use for monster mud?
You could monster mud over anything I imagine. I used pieces of old burlap coated in the mud and just wrapped it around the cauldron, but it definitely needs sealed. The recipe I used was 5gal drywall mud= 1 gal black latex. I didnt really get any pics of the build
Dish Food Cuisine Cookware and bakeware
 

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I have a question for you experienced monster mud creators. I created my first monster mud reeper over the weekend. After the mud compound fully dried (I let it sit for a week), I then applied a coat of Drylock to it. I added some black exterior paint to the drylock to get the gray I was looking for. Once that dries, and since I already have it the color I want, do I really need to paint over this with more exterior paint?

I only ask because I've seen many people paint over the drylock, but is that only to achieve the color they prefer? I would think adding paint to the drylock - to get your desired color - would allow you to skip the top coat paint step, right? I guess I would understand that the top coat exterior paint would add an extra layer of protection, on top of the drylock...but I would think drylock (mixed with exterior paint) would achieve the same results. Or am I wrong here?

Also, I noticed that when I painted on the drylock, the monster mud softened a little bit. Does that harden back up after the drylock fully dries/cures?

Thanks
 
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