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Discussion Starter #1
For a variety of reasons, I've decided to go with a human controlled switch to set off a pop up (and other props) in this year's haunt.

Because it will be easier for the volunteer setting off the prop (and because it looks pretty), I wanted to use a nice push button, illuminated switch that I would build into a control panel for the specific prop.

However, what I've run into is that the switches that I can find are all for 110VAC while the solenoid that I was planning to use is 12VDC. More complicated is that the little light bulb that is contained inside the illuminated switch also runs on 12VDC, at least according to the specs if I am understanding them correctly.

So, while this isn't necessarily a request for a tutorial per se, can someone here perhaps demystify some of the above for me?

What I'm trying to determine is if I can actually get illuminated 12VDC switches that have large plastic lenses like the ones I can get that run on 110VAC (and if so, where). Or, if I can adapt the 110VAC switch somehow so that it'll run 12VDC.

I know that I can get 12VDC switches that are illuminated (mainly for use in cars - hence the fact that they are 12VDC), but they're not quite what I'm looking for. If I have to, I will settle for those, however.

(What I think would look really cool are those big switches they use on the control boards of park rides - like when they hit the button to let the coaster leave the station... Those kinds of switches!)

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

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What type ,brand name , switches are you trying to use?
 

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bc,
The two voltages are for different purposes. The 110VAC rating is what the switch can handle, and 110VAC switch will work with your 12VDC solenoid no problem. The lamp that lights up the button requires a 12VDC power source. If you look on the switches in this link:

Lighted Momentary | AllElectronics.com

you'll see 4 terminals on each one. Two are for the internal light (12VDC) and the other two are for the circuit that you're controlling with the switch. The lights use very little power - you could run several switches from one 12VDC, 500mA wall wart.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey guys... Thanks for the quick responses. That USB Doomsday Device Hub is a bit more elaborate than I was thinking (though it does look cool), but the concept of nice big lit buttons on a control board was what I was hoping for as it will help the volunteer to see what buttons he's pushing in a dark space.

So, based on what Otaku said, can I assume that if I go buy a lit, push button, momentary on switch that says "110VAC" on it, I can wire it up to work with a 12VDC system just fine? If so, then, I think I'm all set as that was the stumbling block. (I had in my mind that just to get the buttons I wanted, I'd have to run 110VAC to the switch, then convert from the switch to 12VDC just to power the rest of the control board and prop.)

I can get 12VDC wall warts locally from a place called "Princess Auto" and they also sell the push button switches I was looking at. (They don't have a brand name as they are a OEM product for Princess Auto, I believe.) They are very industrial looking, which is more or less the look I want. (Yeah... I know it's strange to be worried about how the control board looks!)

Now for a follow up question: I'm supposing that since the solenoid valve I'm using is a 5-way, 2 position, that I would need to have two push button switches in order to allow the dual acting cylinder to do it's thing. If that is correct, I'm considering a different type of switch (that has 2 positions) so that there's no way that the operator could just turn the switch in one direction to make the cylinder extend and then turn the switch to the other position to make it contract. Does that sound like the better option or do you think 2 push-button switches would still be better?
 

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Does the solenoid valve have 1 coil or 2? If only one coil all you would need is a momentery pushbutton switch that will enegerize the coil until the switch is released. If it has 2 coils you would need a 2 position switch , but one of the coils would always be enegerized and the cylinder would be extended or retracted until the position of the switch is changed. I would use a 3 position switch that has an "off" position. So that in the "off" position the solenoid will be de-energized.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi, bfjou812 & all:

So, I've figured out all of the switching issues, in part thanks to this site and in part due to trial and error (more trial than error, fortunately).

I will post what I've built soon...

Meanwhile, on a related topic (to pneumatics, not so much to push button switches), is there a way to make the quick connects on the air compressor not leak as much air? I don't see any way to convert the quick connect to a threaded connection, but the amount of air that it leaks is astounding!

I read Skeletal Remains primer on pneumatics and wolfstone's articles on air compressors, but all the latter says was that if I'm on a tight air budget, that I should use a permanent connection. I don't think I can...

Again, thanks for all of your responses and once I've got the mock up made, I will post what I did.
 

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Hi, bfjou812 & all:

So, I've figured out all of the switching issues, in part thanks to this site and in part due to trial and error (more trial than error, fortunately).

I will post what I've built soon...

Meanwhile, on a related topic (to pneumatics, not so much to push button switches), is there a way to make the quick connects on the air compressor not leak as much air? I don't see any way to convert the quick connect to a threaded connection, but the amount of air that it leaks is astounding!

I read Skeletal Remains primer on pneumatics and wolfstone's articles on air compressors, but all the latter says was that if I'm on a tight air budget, that I should use a permanent connection. I don't think I can...

Again, thanks for all of your responses and once I've got the mock up made, I will post what I did.

If you're talking about the push fittings for plastic tubing , make sure they are the correct size for the tubing you are using. If they are leaking at the threaded connection make sure they are tight and use a sealant, Teflom tape or pipe dope, to seal them. When properly installed these are fairly reliable fittings.
 
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