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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi again all! I’m wondering if anyone has any idea (or knows of an existing tutorial, looked but couldn’t find one) how to get realistic head and arm movement on pneumatic props the way Frightprops does with theirs? It’s too late for this year, I just have some basic pneumatics, but theirs are just so over the top amazing, I’d love to try building one myself (not to mention they are upwards of $4000 and there’s no way we could ever afford that!). If anyone has any vids of props you’ve built with similar movement, I’d love to see them!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Basic but it looks like it's fairly easy to implement. Look about 1/2 way through. I'll be trying this in a couple of weeks when I get to that part of my build.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQ8-74st-yw

I can't imagine how they hold together flailing around like that.
Lol! I know! That’s the part I want to learn how to do, though. I have no issues with basic pneumatics, but I can’t figure out how they get such rapid movement on the arms and head without bulking up the prop and making it too heavy.
 

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That prop is actually made by Poison Props - http://poisonprops.com/product/nun-lunger/
I know they use a scissor type mech to make it move forward....Not sure how the arms and head are designed...I have a few props made from ScareFactory and had a coffin jumper from Scareparts....All these props have an inner welded metal square tube exoskeleton type design with the latex rubber molded around it with foam holding it all together....There was an episode of Distortions "Making Monsters" where they showed a mold laying on the floor with the cured latex rubber in it....They layed the welded tube structure down inside the mold and then started filling around it by pouring the mixed up foam in a bucket over it until it was totally covered....After the foam cured, they pulled all of it from the mold ready for trim and paint and hair and clothes if needed.....Pretty cool process....DC props has some basic designs you could look at....Not sure where to see the welded structure for how the head and arms work....ZR
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That prop is actually made by Poison Props - http://poisonprops.com/product/nun-lunger/
Thanks for that info! I had no idea!! They’re sold on the Frightprops website as “made to order” as if they make them...and at at an almost 40% markup! No links or info for Poison Props on their product pages. I knew that they were a retailer, and didn’t make all of their products, but I really thought the props were their own.
 

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In the Nun Lunger video I'm not sure what I'm seeing. It sure looks like mechanical arm movement but I'm wondering if it's part mechanical and part spring action driven by the body movement.

For example in the Test Slider Mechanism video if the round bar used to lift the arms were the actual arms there would be some spring action depending on the diameter rod.

My wheelchair skeleton (on the list to redesign the day it was completed 10 years ago) has "springy" arms with some nice unplanned action. Horrible quality but I have included the video that best shows the arm action. My next design will include a mechanical arm lift and still try to retain the spring action. That said, it will never match the Nun Lunger's action. Truly awesome. I wish I had the ability to build or the budget to buy a whole yard full of props like those!

http://www.snydercentral.com/halloween/props/skeleton/Skeleton1B.mp4
 

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The short answer is yes it can be done and fairly easily. You would need an assortment of solenoids , cylinders, flow controls and some sort of a controller. You would also need to figure the frame work and what kind of linkages to use. I looked up pneumatic motion control , on You Tube and came up a lot of info. Here's one video that may give you an idea. It doesn't need to be all that complicated and there are enough people here that can help. Thgere is also a lot of calculators on the web for linkages and so on.
https://youtu.be/XAmrbpGtc2I
 

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Wow. Great video Bert! This is were I embarrass myself (again). I didn't know you could mount cylinders horizontally (e.g. for arms and legs). I've seen a lot of mechanical theory in books and on the internet and it never makes sense in my brain until I start piecing together stuff from a pile of parts and see it actually work. I think the pneumatic curtains just got bumped down the to do list.

Product Line Sensor Parallel Tool accessory
 

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hey russ, so you didn’t forget about the pneumatic curtains! lol
your not moving hardly any weight so the angle of the dangle isn’t that important.
btw, those are 3/4” bore 2” stroke cylinders

here’s a video of the arm movements (for some reason i didn’t need the head movements)
 

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and part spring action driven by the body movement.

My wheelchair skeleton has "springy" arms with some nice unplanned action.[/URL]
I think about this a lot when I see a lot of extremely sturdy homemade props. I understand if you're in an area with a lot of wind but it seems too many are built as if to withstand a hurricane. Let the thing move a little.
 
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