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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
On the Beloved thread I was asked if I could make a video showing how I 'tea-stain' my tombstones. While I had the camcorder out and a fresh tombstone I made a complete painting tombstone tutorial. I cover detail painting, 'tea-staining', drybrushing, accent colors and applying moss. Hope it helps :)

 

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Great video, Terra. I wouldn't have thought of the orange, but it looks great.

A wise old man once told me that I couldn't make time that I had to take time, so I guess I'll take some time to make some new tombstones. Especially since my husband pointed out that we're overrun with stryrofoam! LOL.
 

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Caretaker of Eerie Manor
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That was very helpful and informative. It was good seeing the actual process, at least for me. What is the name of the brown paint you use for the lichen. I'm liking that effect and haven't done it yet on any of my stones. btw, the new stone looks great! Love the design.
 

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Technological Terror
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Hey Terra,

Is the Dry Loc used for weatherproofing or just to stiffin' up the carpet or fabric used on top, or both? I guess I need to know if I can skip that step because I am going to make just plain stones to start with and want have anything on them, just plain foamboard.
 

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The Hobo Spider Assassin
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Terra, top notch as usual and love the new stone! Thanks for all the examples and the help you have provided me in the past. Shoot, think you just helped me realize that the tennis elbow I got from dry brushing on my columns was well worth the effort! Next to apply it on a much smaller scale!

One question on this and I'm just verifying what I thought I heard you say. # coats of dry lock on the draped cloth, no monster mud? Is that right or did you mud the cloth first?
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #9
Hey Terra,

Is the Dry Loc used for weatherproofing or just to stiffin' up the carpet or fabric used on top, or both? I guess I need to know if I can skip that step because I am going to make just plain stones to start with and want have anything on them, just plain foamboard.
When I first grabbed a can of the Drylok long ago, my intention was for it to weatherproof the stone (which it does in spades). But it also has jackpot bonuses which I now depend on. First, if you can find it, it comes in gray so I can skip the base color step. Second, it has grit in it which, when dry, gives you an exact cement look and feel to it. When you drybrush those raised bits of grit they get highlighted and it looks so much like stone that it sort of freaks you out, :p Third, it's thick as heck so it finishes up monster work so that the mm additions seamlessly blends into your stone. It's pretty cool stuff really and I wouldn't do a stone without it.

But, in a pinch, do without it? I think so. You could put sand into your exterior latex paint to give the texture and that should hold up to the elements great.
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #10
Terra, top notch as usual and love the new stone! Thanks for all the examples and the help you have provided me in the past. Shoot, think you just helped me realize that the tennis elbow I got from dry brushing on my columns was well worth the effort! Next to apply it on a much smaller scale!

One question on this and I'm just verifying what I thought I heard you saw. # coats of dry lock on the draped cloth, no monster mud? Is that right or did you mud the cloth first?
Thanks Johnny. Isn't drybrushing the coolest effect?! A skill no haunter should be without.

I did mm the cloth. Then I did three coats of Drylok over that. Three coats of Drylok on the stone itself is just over kill and starts to fill in too much any cracks or texture you put on the stone.

I tried two different cloths on this stone. The one you see on the front is flannel. There's one in the back that's regular cotton. Go with flannel! It's thicker and conveyed the carved stone look I was trying to go after better.
 

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Great tombstones, I have not tried my hand at one yet, but was wondering what you use for painting the tombstones after the drylok. I don't see acrylics being able to be used because you would need paint thinner to thin the paint, and waterbased would run in the elements. Help!!
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #14
Great tombstones, I have not tried my hand at one yet, but was wondering what you use for painting the tombstones after the drylok. I don't see acrylics being able to be used because you would need paint thinner to thin the paint, and waterbased would run in the elements. Help!!
Thanks everyone, it's my pleasure :)

I used Exterior Latex Flat paint. The cheapest I could find at Home Depot. I have a gallon of white and a gallon of that dark gray you see. (These will last a lifetime so I suggest just getting quarts). The raw sienna paint (the orangy one) is a simple artist water-based acrylic paint and it held up fine last year. The stones were out a month, night and day.
 

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As always......Fantastic......
Thank you so much for making this video. I am sure it is not nearly as easy as you are making it seem, but it does clarify alot........
 

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Hauntless
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Discussion Starter #16
As always......Fantastic......
Thank you so much for making this video. I am sure it is not nearly as easy as you are making it seem, but it does clarify alot........
Aw, thanks Dan. You may be right, I am an artistic type person but I've never been formally trained. Read a few books here and there.

But,

It really is easy. The tricky part is to relax and let loose when you are painting. The temptation is to go in real careful and do it perfect. Which actually makes your tombstone unrealistic.

The Drylok texture helps loads in helping you get that stone look and the drybrushing just finishes it off. Both steps are very easy. The 'tea-staining' even easier, just brush it on and let gravity do the work. You are simulating years and years of rain/pollution.

When you layer on all these painting steps, one after another, they enhance each other. The step you are doing muddies up yucky parts from the previous step and enhances the better parts. Layer after layer just keeps elevating the realism. If you look at real aged tombstone they are far from perfect. They are almost a mess. :)

Here's the original cemetery that I based this painting technique on. From a jaundiced eye, they look like a disaster, but indeed they have a beauty that is hard to describe:




I find if I'm too uptight, the stone doesn't look as good. Thus all the glasses of wine suggestions :p




.
 

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Soooo Terra, what are the details to the Prop making class on tombstones you are holding in September sometime between the 20 and the 25th????
 

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Hey Terra, awesome video and nice how to! What color dark grey do you use if you dont mind me asking? I never really liked the grey I have used the past couple of years but then again I havent been using dry lock yet either and I think that will help tremendously! Just trying to get more of that stone "grey" look that is on most tombstones. Thanks!
 
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