Halloween Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This morning on Orlando radio, Jay Edwards, one of the hosts of the Scott McKenzie show, asked the general question we've bandied about on the forum, namely, ages for trick or treating. But he added a new twist to the question. His question was how old should kids be before their parents let them go trick or treating without them. Mostly, though, he wanted to justify the fact that he didn't want to let his own 10-year old daughter go trick or treating with her friends in their gated, upwardly-mobile neighborhood. Then he asked if everyone thought it was okay for him to follow them around at a "discrete" distance on his golf cart! Is it just me, or does this creep anybody else out? As a former child, I find that attitude horrifying. If my bald, overweight father (that's the way he describes himself) followed me around on a golf cart while I was trying to trick or treat with my other 10 and 11 year old friends, I would be so embarrassed that I wouldn't be able to show my face around in the neighborhood. Did this guy somehow forget what it was like to be a kid? Does he just not want to let go? Or is it the fact that he fails to realize that an over-protective attitude works in reverse. Seriously. You can't expect a kid to learn how to take care of themselves if a hovering, smothering, over-protective parent won't leave them alone long to do it.

What do you guys think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I too was once a kid. grew up in the 80's. And my parents were very "free" with me. But I could honestly say that I would not let my daughter do most of the stuff I got to do. The world is a changing place. The neighborhood kids always ToT'd alone starting at that age, and even got to stay out late... We grew up in summers in New Hampshire where we left our cabins on our bikes at 8am and returned at 8pm....swimming the lake, exploring the woods, riding bikes along side the highway, all unsupervised. I think with all the bad going on lately parents seem to be more worrisome, me included and my daughter is only 3.
 

·
Evil Wizard
Joined
·
2,165 Posts
Mostly, though, he wanted to justify the fact that he didn't want to let his own 10-year old daughter go trick or treating with her friends in their gated, upwardly-mobile neighborhood.
It might have less to do with not trusting his own daughter, and perhaps more to do with not trusting her friends? Just a thought. *shrug*
 

·
His name is Roger Clyne
Joined
·
9,454 Posts
We have several groups of kids that come around with parents in golf carts but I think that's more because it's easier & golf carts are a "thing" here. :rolleyes: They can hit more houses that way too. Some will hook up a wagon to the cart (or a 4 wheeler) & take all ages around, from toddlers to tipsy adults.

I don't have kids so I don't know what I'd really do. I didn't really ToT much as a kid but the few times I went alone I'd say I was in 6th grade so that's 12, 13 or so.
 

·
Blue Pill? or Red Pill?
Joined
·
4,102 Posts
Usually by 13 or 14 or even 15, most teens dont want to TOT anymore which is about the age I would have let them go alone anyway. Having girls (less than 17) TOT on their own? NEVER. I would send them with a big brother or cool uncle if they don't want me. I TOT'd until I was about 15, and guess what? to your horror - my mother,grandfather and aunt all trailed behind me and my friends and we never cared. I think they enjoyed looking at all the decor too.
 

·
Insert Witty Comment Here
Joined
·
4,484 Posts
I'm okay with the following. It's the laziness that bugs me as I see parental laziness as the biggest threat to Halloween. Trunk or Treats don't thrive becuase they're safer, they thrive because it's easier on the parents..same goes for the death marches at Malls and Harvest parties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I walked with both of my kids until my daughter was at the cutoff age. Now I will walk with my son. I would let my daughter walk with him since she is almost 17, but she wants to hand out candy. My son has never minded me walking with him. Actually, I think he kind of likes it. I don't walk up to the houses, I hang out a the street unless it's one of the neighbors I know and then I might go talk to them. The fact is, there are always several new people in my neighborhood, and for better or worse, I am not a very trusting person with people I don't know. truth is, I am not very trusting of some people I do know. The work I do for the county as a volunteer has only made that worse.You can call it paranoia, or whatever you want, but I do not want my kid to be the next one you're hearing about on the 6 o'clock news.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
We get tons of kids and teens, most tots and kids under 10 are with parents. Older, without.

But the funny thing, I think Parents enjoy more my haunt more than anyone else.

I would go with my kids (If I had some) but WALK with them..

People are so lazy!
 
F

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
My daughter is about 4 years away from being 10...I dont think I could let her go..even with friends. I trust her..I dont trust other people.
 

·
Seer of All
Joined
·
2,939 Posts
Guess that makes me an overprotective parent as well. My kids, now grown, always trick-or-treated in groups and with an adult chaperone. Never thought about doing it any other way.
 

·
Jumpin' Jack Flash
Joined
·
1,261 Posts
christ almighty, parents are over-protective for still escorting their kids at TEN??? my parents took me as long as i was still TOTing. (that was largely due to the fact that i TOTed in several different neighborhoods and they had to drive me, but still.) i don't like coming across as an internet jerk, but "turn your kids loose at 10" seems incredibly dangerous and at least a little naive to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
We live in a very small neighbourhood. If you were to walk the two streets and two short crescents at a leisurely pace it woud take maybe half an hour. TOT takes about 2.

We turned our kids loose at 10. So did every other parent in the neighbourhood. There is a bit of a challenge with the boys to see who could hit every house between 6 and 8. The kids run at ful sprint from house to house. No way parents are even close to catching up. So we let them tear through the neighbourhood.

In the summer the kids play manhunt at night. The ages range from about 8 to 13. They don't start ti 9pm. No parents around then either. We let 'em run around ttil they are exhausted. If there was an injury, usually about three kids will show up at the door to let a parent know.

We chose this neighbourhood because it is so small. It is great for kids.

So no worries as a parent when my lads were unleashed on their own at halloween.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I grew up in a neighborhood where just about everyone knew each other and we we allowed out by around 10 or so by ourselves. That really meant a pack of 5 or 6 kids all travelling together with an older sibling or two mixed in. I walked with mine until about 13 for the oldest and 12 after that. but they have to maintain the buddy system, and stay together. They also better pick up the phone when i call to check on them.
 

·
Resident Potterhead
Joined
·
1,972 Posts
when i was a kid living in north carolina, i was maybe 8 or 9 and that was the first time my mom and then step dad let us go trick or treating by ourselves. we always came home in one piece. the last time i remember being carted around by my parents was the time i accidently cracked into a sweet tart before d-bag step daddy (former, my mom divorced his a$$ almost 20 years ago) had a chance to inspect it and he wholloped me on the back of the head. i think that was when i was 7. every time after that i honestly can not remember an adult either tagging along next to or creepily lagging behind us when we would go out trick or treating. though my oldest brother (step) was 4 or 5 years older than me so i think he was the designated chaperone... even though i think we all ended up parting ways once we got out and met up with our friends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
We went out alone from about age 7 onward. But I will be stalking my own kids until they're thoroughly well and done with trick or treating, I just love going around way too much to give up walking with them. ;)

Usually either my husband stays home to hand out candy at our house and I take the kids out, or my in-laws come to hand out candy and we both go out with the kids.

What age I would let my kids go out without me today is neither here nor there because my older son has an intellectual disability so I can't speak for the average parent of today. I couldn't let him go out alone even if he were 12 or 13 or older. Not sure about the little one (currently age 7)...certainly I wouldn't let him go without a grownup at this age (i.e. with just a group of friends). I'd probably be okay with him going out locally with a group of friends by about age 10.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Truth be told, its not that there are more psychos out there than back in the day, but now we have the media which can disperse all this crazy news to everyone everywhere at every hour. Thus everyone is more paranoid, and the lunatics get more ideas from the media.
Yes.

When I was only six years old, in 1973, a little girl in my town one year older than I went to her teacher's house as part of her Girl Scout selling route. The teacher invited her and her friend inside. Her friend felt uncomfortable and left, but she went in. We were a "safe community," safe as in we went around with our friends outdoors until it was full dark out with no worries at all. We went into friends' homes without a second thought, we got picked up by other moms on the way home from school if it was raining and we didn't have a single blip of fear. This little girl didn't think twice, I guess. None of us would have.

The teacher molested and then killed her. She was just three doors down from her own house. There is a fund in her name to this day. I still contribute.

We could not have believed such a thing could happen "right here," in "such a safe" place. But then again, we weren't bombarded with all the many similar stories that were surely going on across the nation even then. Even before. We are definitely more afraid due to more media exploitation today. That doesn't mean we should pooh-pooh the dangers, we definitely DO need to teach our kids safety. It is paramount. BUT we definitely have a somewhat kaleidoscopic view of "the whole world" being dangerous due to that whole world being made much, much smaller with the instantaneous communication of every evildoing. Frankly there has not been such a horrific event in that area (my hometown) in the 40 years since. But it is huge in our minds. It always will be. God bless Joan D'Allesandro, we will always remember you.

By the way, this did NOT happen on or anywhere near Halloween. It happened on Holy Thursday before Easter. Lunatics do not need a holiday or any special "evil" occasion to be evil. They just are, all year round.
 

·
Human Candy Shovel
Joined
·
1,107 Posts
I walked with both of my kids until my daughter was at the cutoff age. Now I will walk with my son. I would let my daughter walk with him since she is almost 17, but she wants to hand out candy. My son has never minded me walking with him. Actually, I think he kind of likes it. I don't walk up to the houses, I hang out a the street unless it's one of the neighbors I know and then I might go talk to them. The fact is, there are always several new people in my neighborhood, and for better or worse, I am not a very trusting person with people I don't know. truth is, I am not very trusting of some people I do know. The work I do for the county as a volunteer has only made that worse.You can call it paranoia, or whatever you want, but I do not want my kid to be the next one you're hearing about on the 6 o'clock news.
You should make your daughter walk her brother around for Halloween. See, handing out candy is the teenage version of speed dating. You'll be walking your son, your daughter will be collecting phone numbers of all the cute boys.

Vice versa, as a human candy shovel, I can tell when the girls are out trick-or-treating without parental supervsion. Their costumes invariable start with the word "sexy." And your sons who stay home to hand out candy, they're doing the Halloween speed dating thing too, collecting the phone numbers of all the girls wearing those costumes.

At least that's the way it goes with the local teens in my area.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top