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Discussion Starter #1
OK I am going to try explain my vision the best I can.

First of all I always wanted a walk through as a veteran monster at Knott's Scary Farm for 5 years. I really want a maze of my own. I can't build a walk around the house and don't have a lot of storage area... so here is my solution.

A maze build of all 4'x8' wall panels that can be assembled pretty easy in the driveway and then taken down and reassembled as the walls of a storage shed to one hold the walls and the rest of holiday decor.

Here is my sketch up plans thus far:


The maze layout:

Halloween Maze.jpg
Halloween Maze Layout.jpg

Then all the same panels but used as shed walls:

Halloween Maze Shed.jpg

This is very rough and very in begining planning stages. This will not be a reality for this year but next year for sure.... as I will start to build the walls and shed to hold everything for next year. All the walk ways will be 42"+ wide. Which should be ok even for wheel chair access.

What do you guy/gals think am I more nutz then even I thought I was before?


FYI: Wall construction will be tentatively 2X2 frame with 1/8" hardboard on each side. This may get upgraded to 3/8-1/2" OSB if needed.
 

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Human Candy Shovel
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Not nuts at all. I've done the same thing for a knock down haunted shack. The shack is built, but I still need to build all the scares that will go in it.

Don't use 2x2 lumber. Use 2x4 lumber you rip down to 2x2. You'll avoid the hassles of the wood potentially warping and twisting, which is an all too common problem with 2x2 stock.

My walls are sort of built to building code, built from 2x3 lumber and studs spaced accordingly. I also built a floor for it, also 4'x8' panels. There's a 2x4 frame underneath, thin plywood in the middle layer and 5/4 inch deck boards on top. I left spaces in the decking to acts a slots for the bottom of each wall panel.

This year, I add wiring for 12v and 5v power, plus theater style LED emergency lighting and permanent pressure triggers in the floor boards. Next year, the haunts will finally be installed. lol
 

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You may want to consider using metal studs, you'll get perfectly flat panels and won't have to worry about warping. The panels will also be lighter.
 

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Yea the metal studs will cut weight. Im using 2x4 ripping them down and also 2x2s out of the 70% off pile at Home Depot. Works good for panels. As for the skin to really cut cost I pick up scrape panels from local trailer/modular home builder. They put out big loads of scrap. Perfect for this application. Free!!!!
Im doing the same thing your doing this year. Using the 4 car driveway along with the garage. Added up all panels will be 44-4x8 walls and 8-2x8 walls needed. The tongue and groove technique will give it strength also.
 

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Insert Witty Comment Here
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I've been building panels the past couple of years out of 2x4s with 16" centers and 4x8 sheets of OSB so I don't think the idea is crazy at all. I don't think I could get away with turning them into a shed after Halloween though due to building code..plusl... if I was going to do that I would just leave the maze up permanently.

I've never used metal studs...other than weight, what's good about them?
 

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Human Candy Shovel
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I've been building panels the past couple of years out of 2x4s with 16" centers and 4x8 sheets of OSB so I don't think the idea is crazy at all. I don't think I could get away with turning them into a shed after Halloween though due to building code..plusl... if I was going to do that I would just leave the maze up permanently.

I've never used metal studs...other than weight, what's good about them?
Double check your building codes. In my neck of the woods, as long as there isn't a permanent foundation (meaning at the very least pylons in the ground or a poured concrete floor) I don't have to actually follow any building codes when constructing a shed. I just do it to make things sturdy. Also, no permanent foundations means it is classified as a temporary structure and I don't pay any extra property taxes on it.
 

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Insert Witty Comment Here
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Double check your building codes. In my neck of the woods, as long as there isn't a permanent foundation (meaning at the very least pylons in the ground or a poured concrete floor) I don't have to actually follow any building codes when constructing a shed. I just do it to make things sturdy. Also, no permanent foundations means it is classified as a temporary structure and I don't pay any extra property taxes on it.
The building code I worry about would be leaving it on the driveway so close to the house...I guess I could check on that because it would make good use of the panels I already have. As for building a shed, I can go 200 sq ft without a building permit and I'm already doing that right now...just need to shingle it.
 
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