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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

It only took me 17 years to actually post a prop of my own on here. Mind you, I've worked at a few haunts and have had many awesome opportunities to design and build props, displays and haunts over those years. They just haven't been MY props/displays/haunts.. for my house.. not a client, or an attraction. But now I have a house and my own neighbors to scare.

I wanted this year to be big on Halloween, but that's just not in the cards anymore (have you seen the gas prices?) I simply don't have the funds to do what I want at this point. But I have been able to take on some smaller projects.

I made these "non-destructive" boarded up window displays. It's certainly not a feature prop but it does play a strong role in setting the right atmosphere.

These are boarded windows with a twist. I did NOT want to drill any holes in my house. Thusly, I big-brained this funky but effective system that clips a large, window sized frame into the screen panel track. I often seen people install boarded up windows by whole hog sending a screw through some pallet wood and directly into their most expensive purchase. I understand it's not doing any real damage, but my perfectionist brain just can't have holes in my house. So, here you go: boarded windows for the weak-hearted.

If you're worried about the hold that these things have, I can assure you that these aren't going anywhere even in the worst of what global warming could deliver 17 more years from now. Seriously, I've TRIED knocking these things down short of destroying the windows, and they barely had any play at all.

The frame is made of 2x3 which just so happens to end up flush with the shudders when pushed all the way back to the screen panel slots. My goal was to make them look like they're just part of the window frame. I think they were pretty successful in that way. The frames are then clipped into the slots with aluminum angle bar.

The boards are made of foam. Please: if you want to make this, just use old pallet wood. You'll save so much time, headache and cost. With that said, I chose foam for a few near rational reasons:
  1. It's cool to make stuff look like other stuff
  2. It does make it pretty easy to install
  3. I'm less worried about a foam board flying into my neighbor's window during a storm
  4. No splinters!
  5. Those moments when I get to tell someone they're actually foam and they respond "okay." Or "why."
They are painted with acrylic craft paints and 'sealed' with rustoleum clear enamel. Lots of lessons learned here. Pro tips: the paint will just absorb into the foam since you've sculpted grainlines, and spray paint will pretty much find all of the spots you missed and make you very sad about it until you just give up and say to yourself "well, at least it'll be nighttime." And yes, I knew full well that spray paint eats foam. I just thought I covered enough area with paint. I didn't.

Install is easy but you do need two people. I did record video of this whole build, so IF that ever sees the light of day, this install process will be a lot easier to follow. But here goes in writing:
  1. Lower the window to make room for a clamp
  2. One person lifts the frame into the window from the outside, the other clamps the frame in at the top
  3. The angle bar gets screwed in
  4. Everybody claps
Look out for the video if I ever make one. Just don't get your hopes up, but also check back here every day.

Side note: It makes me a little emotional thinking about how this forum is still kicking, even though the sites of my childhood (Monster List, Scary Terry, Vilethings, Devious Concoctions, Skull and Bone, Softly Spoken Magic Spells, Our Haunt, those artfully sloppy GeoCities blogs etc) have all dramatically pivoted or faded out. Thank you to everyone who's keeping this place and my anti-social agenda alive.

Now, here's a bunch of photos of the build in non-sense order:

Wood Lamp Shelving Flooring Tints and shades

Mammal Yellow Grass Hat Leisure

Window Wood Cross Twig Line

Shoulder Shade Textile Wood Gesture

Wood Window Rectangle Twig Cross

White Wood Bone Skull Building
Building Window Wood Plant Shade

Window Building Wood Fixture Composite material

Window Wood Rectangle Twig Line

Azure Rectangle Wood Fence Aqua
 

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Thanks for the compliment!! I put more focus on that last year.
Previously I only used a couple of red par lamps, but last year added 2 LED floods that I can change the color via my phone.
I also added small eagle eye LED spots to highlight specific sings, tombstones, etc.

Check out VanOaksProps on YT. I use a lot of his creativity in my setup!
 

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Wow... I think this post may be what I've been looking for. My house has a brick face and I've been struggling with how to board up my windows without drilling into the brick.

That said..I don't fully understand how you have these things attached to the screen tracks. I see the bar angle screwed into the board, but what holds the bar angle in place? Any additional pictures or details you can provide that can help?
 

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Wow... I think this post may be what I've been looking for. My house has a brick face and I've been struggling with how to board up my windows without drilling into the brick.

That said..I don't fully understand how you have these things attached to the screen tracks. I see the bar angle screwed into the board, but what holds the bar angle in place? Any additional pictures or details you can provide that can help?
I had a hard time at first, too. In this pic you can see some white wood that is not really part of the window at all. That is what the fake boards are attached to and you kind of slap the white wood frame (with the faux boards attached) up on the window exterior.
Window Building Wood Line Triangle

The clamp is used to hold it up while you finish fastening it.

The aluminum angle pieces are used to grip the screen channel (the track that normally holds the screen in place) and the white wood. Now you can take the clamp off and the wood+foam will stay on your window. You don't have a screen in, but the window can still open and if you need to escape you can break the foam easily.

That is my interpretation based on what my windows look like. I have a picture window I may want to try this in, it is flanked by 2 casements so it may be feasible if I keep looking at it.
 

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Wow... I think this post may be what I've been looking for. My house has a brick face and I've been struggling with how to board up my windows without drilling into the brick.

That said..I don't fully understand how you have these things attached to the screen tracks. I see the bar angle screwed into the board, but what holds the bar angle in place? Any additional pictures or details you can provide that can help?
For my brick facade, the windows are recessed and allow me to insert 2 boards that are perpendicular to the window and slide into the recess in front of the windows. I run screws through these boards in "into" the bricks. Although, they do not penetrate the bricks on the house, it creates enough tension to hold my prop in place.

I have access to these in storage if closeup pictures would help.
 

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I had a hard time at first, too. In this pic you can see some white wood that is not really part of the window at all. That is what the fake boards are attached to and you kind of slap the white wood frame (with the faux boards attached) up on the window exterior.
View attachment 761758
The clamp is used to hold it up while you finish fastening it.

The aluminum angle pieces are used to grip the screen channel (the track that normally holds the screen in place) and the white wood. Now you can take the clamp off and the wood+foam will stay on your window. You don't have a screen in, but the window can still open and if you need to escape you can break the foam easily.

That is my interpretation based on what my windows look like. I have a picture window I may want to try this in, it is flanked by 2 casements so it may be feasible if I keep looking at it.
This makes sense now, I appreciate the guidance. I will have to take a closer look at my screen track to see if this is feasible. That said, I now have safety concerns in using old pallet wood to board up my windows as they would be used on windows of 2 bedrooms...

For my brick facade, the windows are recessed and allow me to insert 2 boards that are perpendicular to the window and slide into the recess in front of the windows. I run screws through these boards in "into" the bricks. Although, they do not penetrate the bricks on the house, it creates enough tension to hold my prop in place.

I have access to these in storage if closeup pictures would help.
Oh I like this idea too and may be lost costly than buying the aluminum channel as mentioned above... still have the safety concerns with boarding up bedroom windows tho.


Anyone have experience with brick clips? I'm in Buffalo and we get some pretty nasty October weather, so wondering if they would be strong enough to hold up to the elements.
 

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I had a hard time at first, too. In this pic you can see some white wood that is not really part of the window at all. That is what the fake boards are attached to and you kind of slap the white wood frame (with the faux boards attached) up on the window exterior.
View attachment 761758
The clamp is used to hold it up while you finish fastening it.

The aluminum angle pieces are used to grip the screen channel (the track that normally holds the screen in place) and the white wood. Now you can take the clamp off and the wood+foam will stay on your window. You don't have a screen in, but the window can still open and if you need to escape you can break the foam easily.

That is my interpretation based on what my windows look like. I have a picture window I may want to try this in, it is flanked by 2 casements so it may be feasible if I keep looking at it.
I have a brick front and I did something similar to board up my windows. The frame was original designed to hold Christmas lights. A friend of mine created window frame made of wood that I could attach rgb light strips that I could simply place into the window. The fit was tight enough against the brick to keep the frame in place. Later I added second set of lights consisting of rgb bulbs. Fit was still tight enough to keep frame in window.

Purple Light Plant Blue Black
Shelving Wood Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Last year I added the wood strips for halloween to give boarded up look. I simple screwed them into the wood frame. For some of the windows, the combined weight of the light strips, bulb strips and the wooden boards was tool much to keep the frames from falling out. I took some flat corded bungie cords and hook one end to top of frame, opened to top part of window and pulled the cord through and closed the window on the bungie cord. This was enough to keep the frames in from October to the end of December. After Halloween I removed the screws that kept the boards attached to frame and continue to use the lights for the Christmas display.

Wood Hardwood Gas Beam Wood stain
Outerwear Building Purple Leaf Window
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Wow... I think this post may be what I've been looking for. My house has a brick face and I've been struggling with how to board up my windows without drilling into the brick.

That said..I don't fully understand how you have these things attached to the screen tracks. I see the bar angle screwed into the board, but what holds the bar angle in place? Any additional pictures or details you can provide that can help?
@Engineerchic got it 100% right in their response to this.

I made this mock up drawing in Rhino today which should help visualize the method.

Font Audio equipment Electronic device Terrestrial plant Display device
 

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@Engineerchic got it 100% right in their response to this.

I made this mock up drawing in Rhino today which should help visualize the method.

View attachment 761768
Nice pic! This is a case of the project looking too good. At first when I read the original post I saw a screw going into the actual window frame. Those white frames you made look too much like they are part of the window, lol.

Similar confusion when faux rust or faux lichen looks so realistic you can't believe it isn't real until you touch it.
 

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I have a brick front and I did something similar to board up my windows. The frame was original designed to hold Christmas lights. A friend of mine created window frame made of wood that I could attach rgb light strips that I could simply place into the window. The fit was tight enough against the brick to keep the frame in place. Later I added second set of lights consisting of rgb bulbs. Fit was still tight enough to keep frame in window.

View attachment 761763 View attachment 761764

Last year I added the wood strips for halloween to give boarded up look. I simple screwed them into the wood frame. For some of the windows, the combined weight of the light strips, bulb strips and the wooden boards was tool much to keep the frames from falling out. I took some flat corded bungie cords and hook one end to top of frame, opened to top part of window and pulled the cord through and closed the window on the bungie cord. This was enough to keep the frames in from October to the end of December. After Halloween I removed the screws that kept the boards attached to frame and continue to use the lights for the Christmas display.

View attachment 761765 View attachment 761766
Really like the added touch with the lights!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This is not weak-hearted - It's brilliant! And it looks great. I've been wanting so SEE how someone else boarded up their windows realistically, but without damaging the house.
Hahaha thank you! I'm willing to bet this has been done a few times before but I haven't seen anyone post about it. I, too, would love to see what different approaches to this issue others have figured out.
 
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