Halloween Forum banner

21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
135 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
I’m basically done. How do you think they came out?

I hit one snag. Tried the tea stain on the Rex one and didn’t really do anything. Not sure if it needed to be more watery, or if the earlier coat had already dried too much. Is tea stain supposed to interact with the paint coat I just applied? Should I try again?

Also, is there any need for white dry brushing? I don’t really have any raised elements, or would they benefit from it anyway ?




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
I am returning my Drylok then since I did not even use it. Any cheap exterior latex is fine?
You can use any exterior latex, however always remember with paint you get what you pay for (i.e. the cheaper the paint the less it will protect your props). You can get really cheap exterior paints that don't contain primer for $10-$15 a gallon, I personally don't use them. I typically use Glidden (cheap $15-$20 per gallon) when I'm mixing it with other components like drywall spackle (monstermud). But I mainly use Behr Preimum Plus ($30-$25 per gallon) for any kind of mache work (Pumpkinrot also likes using this brand for his stuff); it has really good water repellent properties and takes finish paint (acrylics) well. I use a matte finish, water based paint which allows me to thin it with water if necessary (don't use oil based). In the end use what you can afford and like.
 

·
Blue Pill? or Red Pill?
Joined
·
4,153 Posts
i don't know if it's possible to use too much acetone ... well i suppose that too much would dissolve everything

i'm curious how the acetone melted areas would look if they were roughed up with a wire brush? just an idea i had & it may not yield a good effect, but i'd be interesting to try on a scrap chunk of foam. i'm thinking that the wire brush might reduce the "roundness" of the acetone melted parts & it'd look more random maybe? naturally varying the pressure of the wire brush would yield different results. i'm thinking that a normal wire brush that cleans files would probably be too wide & a thinner brush, say 1/4" might be more suitable? i'm thinking that a rotary dremel type wire brush might be too uncontrollable, but i'm just guessing about that & that might the way to go?

amk
As amk said, using a sandpaper sponge (ore wire brush)to lessen the well defined circles might also work. Also, if you use spray paint, and use a stencil, you can get less obvious effects and it will eat at the foam too plus have cool stencils of your choosing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Those look great., how do you plan to seal and paint them?

I have found that I get so into the detail, and 99.9% of people take a quick glance and keep moving. I have to stop myself realizing NOBODY is every going to scrutinize them the way I do. Not to mention you are looking at them from 6"-3' away, most people will see them from 10' away or more. It is good to take a few steps back, in the correct light, and decide what is really going to be seen. Forcing yourself to stop at 'good enough' is the bigger challenge.
This is so true. I spend so much time agonizing over small details that are totally lost at night - especially during trick or treat madness.

Part of the reason I post here is so that I can share these details with people who appreciate them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
Decided to experiment. On left is two coats of drylok. On right is 2 parts monster mud, 1 part black latex and 1 part white latex. Both look great. Drylok a little bit more grainy but not by much. Also dried quicker so I had to be more expedient in spreading out the paint in the fine lettering. I guess I’ll have to report back in 6 months to see how each holds up in durability. Nice to have the different color variations.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
My vote is for the drylok. I've used it on all of my props for the past 8 years and each of them has held up incredibly well. I like to buy the darker drylok and then drybrush white. With the sandy texture of the drylok, it really looks like stone.

What really finishes the prop, in my opinion though is the weathering. I like mine to be very old and decrepit looking, but even newer cemeteries have weathered stones. here's my most recent foam prop as an example:

730226
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
[mention]oldmeat [/mention] I love your obelisk and that’s on my radar some day. I still have yet to apply a couple coats of tea stain to finish off mine. Besides the tea stain, do you do anything else for weathering?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
i've never used a tea stain, and I'm not quite sure what that is....

I spray my props down with a hose until they are as wet as possible. then I paint them with spray paint in spots where water would normally infiltrate (top) and where mold and dirt would likely be over time (cracks, corners, ledges). Then I gently hose down the spray paint spots so that it runs down in a natural formation. The longer you wait to wash the spray paint off, the deeper the look. repeat with greens and browns until you like how t looks. the best part about this, is that there really is no way to "mess" this up. the uglier the better!
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top