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The Haunting Girl
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So like many of you I have many cans of mis-tint paint that I picked up for cheap. They've all been stored inside my house and should still be good. I live about 5 minutes away from Lowe's, so going over to get them shaken isn't that big a deal, but sometimes I just want to get right into working on things. Dragging cans downstairs (I live on the second floor), trying to find an employee at the store, and finally getting home can take a large chunk out of my prop building time.
I know they sell mixer attachments for drills, but I'm wondering how well they actually work. I'm concerned about making a mess and/or damaging something. Has anyone else used them?
 

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I have one and it works very well to a point. That meaning that I forgot to take some paint in from the garage last year and i couldn't get it to mis at all due to the fact that it froze and for the life of me I couldn't get the chunks out. Luckily it was only about a quart that was bad.
 

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The Haunting Girl
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What's wrong with a good old fashion paint stick? That's all I've ever used for 50+ years.
I do use paint sticks a lot, but if the paint has been sitting for too long it can take a while to get it completely mixed again. Also, sanded paint like Drylok can be pain. I try to make one big trip at the start of any build to get that initial good shake in so I can just use paint sticks, but I always manage to forget one or two cans.
 

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Yeah there's kind of a knack to stirring paint in a can, you have to pull the paint up from the bottom as you stir. My father tought me that technique when I was barely big enough to hold a paint brush.
 

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The mixers that work on a drill are awesome. I use them for everything. Not only paint... plaster, silicone (for mold making), resin (for making castings). The metal ones are great, but the plastic ones work too. To get them to mix well you need to move them slowly up and down in the can while doing it so that the heavy stuff at the bottom gets remixed with the lighter stuff at the top.

I started using them because I have rheumatoid arthritis, and they are a life saver!
 

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HELLoween Ubber Lord
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Yes I remod houses for a living & use paint mixers. they're just paddle wheels & meant to be used on a slower setting on a heavy duty drill with 5 gal buckets & not meant to be mixed fast so there should never be any paint flying out....lol 1 gal cans just put into a 2 or 2 1/2 gal small bucket ( or a 5 gal ) & get out ye ol paint stick, you can ad a little water if too thick but not much, just enough to loosen it up.
Also good idea to put down a decent piece of plastic on the floor to catch any boo boo's that might jump out......LoL ;)
 

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The Haunting Girl
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys! I was thinking that I could use it for more than just paint, so it would be good to have in general. I know from my many years of baking not to go crazy with the speed.

I started using them because I have rheumatoid arthritis, and they are a life saver!
That was my other motivation for asking. I've injured both of my shoulders, and I occasionally have problems in my arms and hands. I'm still okay right now, but I know down the road that most simple things like stirring paint won't be easy anymore.
 

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I have tons of old paint that I use all the time for Halloween props. I just shake the sh*t out of it until the colors are well mixed (just make sure the lid is on tight) :D.

You don't have to bother with paint sticks, drill bits or taking it to a store to mix it. Just some quick hard shakes for about 20-30 seconds will do the trick (that's pretty much what the machine will do at Lowes anyway). I usually rotate the can 45 degrees every 5 seconds to change the angle at which I'm shaking it.
 
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