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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So many really good options/suggestions offered. Thanks to all. I ended up using a utility knive and sand paper. It's not too bad and will be mounted up high and painted to resemble old painted wood, so that'll help to hide a lot of the inconsistent cuts.



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So I have cut out an archway with a saber saw but now wish to apply all those wonderful medieval bevels. I would be interested in suggestions on how to go about this task. The bevel would be applied on the outside edges marked by the outer template lines.

I have a dremmel but how would I Angle it?
Or would a hot knife be better?
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The arch is 2” thick.
 

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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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Can I just say - that is beautiful work and I almost want you to leave it in sharp perfect condition? I know, it would look great with the bevels and would be more accurate, but darn it, that's lovely. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How about a jig saw with the bottom shoe plate angled?
That may work well. It would be kinda inconsistent due to the blade bending as I cut and the smaller areas would be a nightmare... Might be worth trying though..
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Can I just say - that is beautiful work and I almost want you to leave it in sharp perfect condition? I know, it would look great with the bevels and would be more accurate, but darn it, that's lovely. :)
Well thank you! But unbeveled would drive me mad. The archway really needs those bevels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You could use a router or possibly find a router bit for the Dremel and use the router guide?
Well, I'd need a pretty big router bit to make those edges. That's part of the problem is the bevels are larger than most bits.
 

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It does look great! I would think the tool matters less than using a jig or guide(s) to keep a consistent cut. Each tool mentioned would be good for a different part of the arch. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It does look great! I would think the tool matters less than using a jig or guide(s) to keep a consistent cut. Each tool mentioned would be good for a different part of the arch. Good luck!
Thanks! I have just a few days to get this thing done so I better make a plan now...
 

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When you are looking at doing big cuts like that you are looking at 1/2"bits, and they can be mean and usually built for use in a more powerful router (Thus the larger shaft) As you are going through styrofoam, you could have a lower powered router but it will still need to take a 1/2" shaft.

I'll link a really pretty profile that I think would look great on that, but sadly your choice are somewhat limited by the tools you have on hand.

 

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You could try mounting one of these snap off type knife blades at an angle or if you don't trust your ability to hold it at a consistent angle, you could try mounting the blade to an angled block of wood. However, I think the suggestion of using a edge router bit would probably give the best results if you have access to or the budget to purchase a router. A small single handed or trim router would probably do the job. you can get one from Harbor Freight for $30
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This is probably over kill but an Industrial Hot Knife would also work: Industrial Hot Knife - Hot... (hotwirefoamfactory.com)
View attachment 753449
Yup, I tried something similar with really bad results. Controlling the cut and how the insulation board melts in inconsistent ways was a nightmare. I had to abandon it before I really messed it up.

You could try mounting one of these snap-off type knife blades at an angle or if you don't trust your ability to hold it at a consistent angle, you could try mounting the blade to an angled block of wood. However, I think the suggestion of using an edge router bit would probably give the best results if you have access to or the budget to purchase a router. A small single-handed or trim router would probably do the job. you can get one from Harbor Freight for $30
Yes, I should have gone with the hand router but my budget is spent. I ended up using a utility knife and sandpaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
When you are looking at doing big cuts like that you are looking at 1/2"bits, and they can be mean and usually built for use in a more powerful router (Thus the larger shaft) As you are going through styrofoam, you could have a lower powered router but it will still need to take a 1/2" shaft.

I'll link a really pretty profile that I think would look great on that, but sadly your choice are somewhat limited by the tools you have on hand.

That is one big router bit. Well, I do have a larger router but I'm terrible at routing and felt it was too big to maneuver, so I went with a utility knife and sandpaper. The piece is up high and will be painted to resemble old wood so I can hide a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
So many really good options/suggestions offered. Thanks to all. I ended up using a utility knive and sand paper. It's not too bad and will be mounted up high and painted to resemble old painted wood, so that'll help to hide a lot of the inconsistent cuts.



-------------------------

So I have cut out an archway with a saber saw but now wish to apply all those wonderful medieval bevels. I would be interested in suggestions on how to go about this task. The bevel would be applied on the outside edges marked by the outer template lines.

I have a dremmel but how would I Angle it?
Or would a hot knife be better?
View attachment 752807 View attachment 752808 The arch is 2” thick.
So here’s where we are with it. Painted to resemble an old wooden archway. My daughter artistry has given this piece the authenticity it needed.
Automotive tire Wood Brickwork Brick Art
 
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