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Is there an inexpensive tool that can measure fog density from a fog machine? Although fog machines provide details of their output, such as cubic feet per minute (cfm), I want to measure density as the fog travels thru a PVC pipe that has holes every 6 inches. The further down the pipe you go, the less fog you will have due to exiting the holes. These kinds of PVC pipes are used to create fog curtains or distribute fog evenly across a yard.

I thought about using a hygrometer thinking a higher density of fog implies higher humidity levels, but I am unsure if this idea would work since glycol, the liquid most commonly used in fog machines, can be measured in the same way.

Meteorologists measure fog using two (or more) sensors and transmitting an infrared beam between the sensors. Humidity, temperature, and other data are needed to measure fog density. However, meteorological equipment is outside most people's budgets.

Does anyone have any ideas? Thanks!
 

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Years ago I attempted to do this to determine whether the 1200w chauvet fogger was putting out more fog than a 900w fogger. I used a closed room, a black target card, a digital camera, and a tripod. I set the camera onto the tripod, pointed at the target card. I then turned on the fogger and let it run until the room seemed "foggy", which was about 15 minutes (IIRC). I then snapped a picture with the flash turned off. Taking the picture to the computer, I could then see how much of the black card was visible. If I was clever, I could have done it by counting the number of pixels. Not being clever, I took a view of the whole card to see how "grey" it looked. Comparing the pictures from the 1200w to the 900w unit showed that the resulting fog density was nearly identical, which was to be expected, since the 1200w unit actually was drawing 901w (Chauvet later claimed that their Chinese manufacturer had pulled a fast one on them by substituting an less powerful heater).
 
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