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What are some of your favorite lighting techniques? Or do you have a favorite type of light that you use in your haunt? I'm curious to see pictures!
 

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So glad you started this thread Pretty Little Nightmare! We are doing our first haunt and while I only have a few props, I feel that the lighting and music are top priorities. I am working on some Witches' Lanterns to hang from some tree branches but other than that, I don't have anything. I did luck out and pick up a few strands of the string lights in orange at a yard sale. Can't wait to see everyone's pictures and ideas!
 

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So glad you started this thread Pretty Little Nightmare! We are doing our first haunt and while I only have a few props, I feel that the lighting and music are top priorities. I am working on some Witches' Lanterns to hang from some tree branches but other than that, I don't have anything. I did luck out and pick up a few strands of the string lights in orange at a yard sale. Can't wait to see everyone's pictures and ideas!
This should get you started for your first

http://robertdbrown.com/2014/01/26/skullandbone-com-haunt-lighting-tutorial/

As for WHAT to buy, myself, I would recommend CFL (the spiral florescent) colored bulbs and Clamp lights.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Bayco-8.5-Clamp-Light/14003467

http://www.homedepot.com/b/Electrical-Light-Bulbs-CFL-Light-Bulbs/Other-Colors/N-5yc1vZbmatZ1z0u18v

Learn those rules before you go breaking them (like I do on occasion).

The importance of the cool lighting with warm accents in a little lighting test I did in 2012
Here just blue and green floods:



Adding the accent:



However, I'm often lighting for a walkthrough, which presents different challenges than lighting for a scene. Low flood lights mean people walk in front of them and ruin effects.

Here the flood is placed on the roof to help light the scene.



Creating dark space:

Here, we have bright warm light at the opening, with cool highlights at the back. This creates an optical illusion that the center (the "corn tunnel") is pitch black. It's actually quite well lit, but you CAN'T TELL THAT untill you step off into it. Many a child stepped right up to that gate and had to be coerced to enter by parents. Several flat out refused.



Warm light overload.

Torches provided much of the lighting here, and I swapped in warm lighting in the Chimera to actuall enhance that orange bathing with all the jack o lanterns. This was perhaps not the best lighting decision, but helped to set up the back yard this particular year.



Backlighting.

Everything behind this tomb (and off to the right) was backlit in 2012. Just wanted the basic shapes to be seen. Unfortunately the breeze was a little too much for the fog to assist much with the backlighting (all blowing towards the back of this shot when every night prior it was blowing off to the right where I wanted it)




If you couldn't tell from above, I'm a big fan of making props that serve as their own lighting. This guy has 2 CFLs and a fog machine in him to act as his lighting.

 

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in for later
 

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This is an area where we really have a lot to learn. I think good lighting really ups the whole look of anything you decorate with, and it's something that we're only now starting to work harder on. We are on a corner & have sometimes struggled with lighting because there's a streetlight nearby. This year our township has been using lights that aren't as bright (maybe LEDs?), so we're hoping it gives us a bit more darkness to work with.

That said, we've been happy with a couple of our lighting choices, but our display is mostly lower tech compared to a lot of awesome options I see here.

Here's a few pics I have liked from our displays ~

The first year we lit up individual tombstones with the C7 bulbs & soda cans was a huge difference for us because we had been searching for a way to do better lighting onto our stones but didn't know how. I found the instructions on Pinterest & it made such a big difference in our whole display!



And last year, the first time we bought a fire & ice spotlight. We liked the movement aspect so much we bought a red & orange one this year and we don't even have an idea yet on how we'll use it! LOL! But we just know we think they're cool!

 

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The only thing to add is sometimes I use white light or white with a brown lighting gel to bring out subtleties in paint. I use all cfl bulbs in hoods and try to hide them in bushes, hanging from trees and behind stuff. I have green bulbs inside the witch's cauldron to light the fog smoke pumped out of it. My pics are on this website. https://sites.google.com/site/zlalomz/spiderriderhalloween

desatmedium.jpg
 

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Love this thread and all the pictures! Question: What's the best way to light up a prop with red? I want to cast a red glow on my Baron Samedi prop but I don't want him to look like he's on fire, which always seems to happen when I try to use red.
 

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Love this thread and all the pictures! Question: What's the best way to light up a prop with red? I want to cast a red glow on my Baron Samedi prop but I don't want him to look like he's on fire, which always seems to happen when I try to use red.
Red IS indeed a tricky one.

I know just the problem you're talking about:

(sorry, before I got a decent camera) Red flood right at the base.


My solution then was to put a dimmer on the red flood, and bring in other light. In this case a green flood on the roof a good deal away, that could light the rest of the scene, thus adding a little muting to the red as well.



I would think, especially where Baron Samedi should be black and white in the face, you want some of that white to show, so you're going to want a bit of blue and or green along with some of the red to highlight the white.

Depending on your character, too. here I've put an interior red light, with a blue spot, this lets the shadowed parts glow through red, where those hit with the blue read more white.



But, I think mixing your colors is in your best interest in this. Let your shadowed areas take up the red, and diffuse it in your highlights with blue and green from another source.

Consider pin spots to more control the areas. (my son messing with those little clip on led spotlights, blue, green, and red, but another red on the left instead of a green would actually give a good look)

 

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