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Hello fellow hunters

As I am sure you all know, this time of year requires many extension cords to keep the frights and scares going. My question is. Is it safe to use an indoor extension cord outside and vice versa? When I look at the gauge, they are exactly the same. They "look" no different, but the cost is very different. What is your feedback?
 

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His name is Roger Clyne
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I think it depends on the weather in your area, the length of time you're leaving these props out & how much power they'll need.

I have used indoor cords but I only put certain things out the day of Halloween so they're only on for about 3-4 hours.
 

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We use them almost interchangeably. We'll leave them outside for about 3 weeks. We don't take any special care to cover them. We will take half a care to keep them out of low spots on the ground, to prevent energizing a puddle.

But they're energized for only 4 or 5 nights, for an hour each night.

No complaints with them, but we still buy exterior cords when we need new ones.

James
 

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Hello fellow hunters

As I am sure you all know, this time of year requires many extension cords to keep the frights and scares going. My question is. Is it safe to use an indoor extension cord outside and vice versa? When I look at the gauge, they are exactly the same. They "look" no different, but the cost is very different. What is your feedback?
The easy question first - There is absolutely no issue with using an outdoor rated extension cord indoors.

As for using an indoor only rated cords outside, it can be done with no problem and people do it all the time for limited periods of time. But you want to make sure you try to weatherproof them a little if you can to protect against rain or in some cases snow. This can usually be accomplished by keeping the plug ends out of low spots (no puddles) and wrapping the plug ends with electrical tape. With a modern electrical system in your house, if you do have a problem it should only result in tripping a circuit breaker either on the individual wall plug (if so equipped) or down in the "fuse box" which of course doesn't have fuses anymore. This should only be for short term use and keep in mind that this approach does not comply with the fire or building code s anywhere in the U.S. so proceed at your own risk. The plain and simple truth is that as long as you keep it out of the water and don't place in a spot where it will be trampled on you should be just fine. Good luck with your Haunt.
 

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Only difference I can think of is the outside jacket of the cord. An outside cord will hold up to the UV longer than a indoor and the thickness of the jacket may be different. Ah one other thing may be an outdoor cord always has three prongs where as some indoor only have a two prong. Which is for safety reasons.


I personally make my own from 12/2 romex and replacement plugs. Seems to be a whole lot cheaper.
 

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Only difference I can think of is the outside jacket of the cord. An outside cord will hold up to the UV longer than a indoor and the thickness of the jacket may be different. Ah one other thing may be an outdoor cord always has three prongs where as some indoor only have a two prong. Which is for safety reasons.


I personally make my own from 12/2 romex and replacement plugs. Seems to be a whole lot cheaper.
The 3rd conductor of an "outdoor" cord is ground. Totally useless for any holiday lights as they are just hot and neutral. This is also the case for most of our props with the exception of maybe fog machines.
 

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For the sake of safety anything that is connected to household voltage that might be exposed to moisture should always be plugged into a GFCI outlet.
 

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I will wrap electrical tape around all connections, then plastic zip bag..and the best way to hide all those powerstrips I use..under a half coffin (toe pnicher)..and make sure they all get plugged into GFCI..haven't had any problems for years.
 

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Hello fellow hunters

As I am sure you all know, this time of year requires many extension cords to keep the frights and scares going. My question is. Is it safe to use an indoor extension cord outside and vice versa? When I look at the gauge, they are exactly the same. They "look" no different, but the cost is very different. What is your feedback?
Living in MB, the one BIG difference between indoor and outdoor cords is the composition of the jacket. It get cold here around Halloween. Indoor cords will get hard and crack when moved or bent. If you are looking for good deals on cords. Costco usually has 3 packs (outdoor) of 25ft cords for around $10 (usually around xmas)
 

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Oak Lane Cemetery
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I use only outdoor rated cords and wrap the connection with a strip of electrical tape, then in a plastic bag being careful not to position the bag in a way that will collect water inside. Green freaky fabric hides these ugly connections very well. I use a couple of multi plug splitters that have breakers built in as central connections for all my cords to branch out from. I've also upgraded most of my lighting to LEDs which are much safer to use with multiple extension cords because they draw only a fraction of the power an incandescent or fluorecsent would.
 

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I've been using common outdoor cables and incandescent floods since '09 without incident (so far)
That's with all sorts of 2 prong light cords running into 3 prong sockets, 3 to 1 adapters with uncovered sockets, etc.
I use about 20 floods around the house,10 more over the roof, 6 or more 40 watt bulbs, and two foggers - all going into 3 circuits.

The lighting is usually in the elements for about two weeks.
I wondering if I'm pressing my luck!
:eek:


I've seen those connection protectors, and that's way too much$$
71A9nCbFBlL._SX425_.jpg

I'm considering using Tupperware tubs to hold the 3-to-1s, using 8" lengths of PVC to cover the single cord connections, and jamming pipe insulation sleeves into the tub and PVC openings to keep out moisture.
 

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Insert Witty Comment Here
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I don't tape or wrap or any of that stuff....I just plug in and walk away. I don't set stuff in puddles or in gutters, but other than that, I don't do anything as far as cords go to protect them from the weather. I easily had a couple of hundred connections under snow at Christmas and have yet to have a problem. The only weather proofing would be the lightorama boxes themselves to make sure the water/snow doesn't get in them.
 

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Funeral Crasher
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I don't tape or wrap or any of that stuff....I just plug in and walk away. I don't set stuff in puddles or in gutters, but other than that, I don't do anything as far as cords go to protect them from the weather. I easily had a couple of hundred connections under snow at Christmas and have yet to have a problem. The only weather proofing would be the lightorama boxes themselves to make sure the water/snow doesn't get in them.
I pretty much do the same thing. I only had a problem once, when it was raining cats and dogs on Christmas Eve.
So I didn't run anything that night, except indoor décor.
 
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