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Discussion Starter #1
I accidently bought the non-assembled kit74 and have no clue how to put it together. I put all the pieces in the right holes but not sure what I'm supposed to do now. Do I have to connect the pieces of metal that are sticking out in a to each other, just push them down or is there a very confusing way of putting it together? If anyone knows a guide for this please post.
 

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Bête noire
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The kit is meant to be soldered by the purchaser. The board already has the copper traces in/on it that connect the components; you just have to solder the parts to the little exposed pads where the terminals stick out. Check the instructions that shipped with the kit - it should tell you all you need to know about which part goes where and the best sequence in which to do the soldering. Typically the lowest profile parts are done first, like resistors and diodes (be sure of the orientation of the diodes), ending with the taller parts like the relays.

You'll need a soldering iron, a 30 to 40 watt iron with a fine tip will work well for this project, and good quality 60/40 rosin-core solder. Use a small diameter solder; it'll melt easier and you'll have better control over the amount. If you haven't done any soldering before, practice using the iron on some pieces of stripped wire or scrap PCB if you can get hold of some. Don't overheat the parts when soldering - just leave the iron on the terminal long enough to get a clean, shiny junction.
I strongly recommend searching online for soldering tutorials - I've run across several that explain the principles and techniques very well.
 

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Open up and say "Aaaaahh"
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1,562 Posts
Be prepared...I've soldered the K74, and although not difficult, it is a tad time consuming. It helps to do it in sections, then take a break and come back to it later. I also soldered the Velman 16 relay board and as an experienced solderer it still took me 2 days to finish. I like the money you save with the kits, but not sure the time it involves to put together is worth the savings.
 

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Bog Body
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1,474 Posts
i rather like soldering onto board. i find it a nice little challenge as each time is different. It's also relaxing to me. then the finished product always is able to command a sense of pride. i did a motor speed controller 2 years ago that has enough amperage handling to keep a wiper motor strong but slow.

just take it slow, keep the iron tip clean, and don't use too much solder.
 
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