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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm running a flying crank ghost off of a wiper motor. My problem is that when I use a 9 or 6 volt adaptor with the motor it either jerks, or doesn't have enough strength to pull the ghost.

A 12 volt transformer works great, but the ghost looks like it's trying to break out of my house rather than move slowly.

I figure I could probably control the prop with one of the expensive devices for sale at Monsterguts, etc., but I only have two electrical props this year, and can't afford to pay too much for the effect.

Is there anyway cheap I can slow the motor down without losing power?

Figured somebody here would have to know.

Thanks.
 

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having trouble picturing if it will do what you need but if you pic up a low risistor it should lower the power on the transformer but not so much that you will lose your effect sorry I can't give you an ecact number right now but if I figure it ou tI wil let you know
 

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Keeper of Spider Hill
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are you sure your power packs are producing enough current at the lower voltage to run your motor ? The standard 5 volt power packs that Monster Guts sells with their wiper motors works perfectly. I am using one on my grave grabber and it runs as smooth as glass and has enough power to rip his arms off if need be... :rolleyes:
 

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It sounds like your power supply is not supplying enough amps, whats it rated at? Your going to need at least something that outputs 4-5 amps. Like Diabolik said MG offers 5V 5A supplies. Remember wiper motors are akin to starter motors i.e. high torque motors and require more ampers. Hope that helps.

As for cheap, MG seems to offer the cheapest solution... you can find tons of 5-12V supplies but offer only .5 to 1000mA, not big enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Awesome! I'm ordering one today. Seriously love this communal site. And really appreciate the help. I've learned a ton from the folks here, and have set up a pretty fun home haunt. The kids and neighbors are all really excited.

Happiness to all
 

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The less power you provide the motor, the slower it will go it will also loose strength. What you really need to feed it what it wants and that’s 12 volts, the way you control it is with a motor speed controller like this MXA033 PWM DC Motor Speed Controller
That little booger is ideal...

- Load voltage : 12/24 VDC / 15A max. continuous duty when used as a motor controller

That right there will handle all your needs!! :D
 

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The Evil Apparitionist
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Are they supplying the 3.7a, people in the review section are saying they are seeing 1.5a? If the really do put out 3.7a, they maybe worth while for sure.
It has been confirmed by many people (myself included) that those supplies are not capable of anywhere near 3.7 amps and that they loose regulation (voltage drops quickly) over 1.5 amps. There are many similar supplies out there with the same price and better regulation.


That little booger is ideal...

- Load voltage : 12/24 VDC / 15A max. continuous duty when used as a motor controller

That right there will handle all your needs!! :D
You will still need to add a 12 volt power supply with enough current (like 2 amps) to the speed controller but they are cheap and easy to find (like an old computer).

PWM speed controllers are still the best option since you can tweak the speed of the motor without sacrificing any torque. They pulse the full voltage on and off at an adjustable rate, but in doing so most cause the motor to make noise too.
 

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It has been confirmed by many people (myself included) that those supplies are not capable of anywhere near 3.7 amps and that they loose regulation (voltage drops quickly) over 1.5 amps. There are many similar supplies out there with the same price and better regulation.




You will still need to add a 12 volt power supply with enough current (like 2 amps) to the speed controller but they are cheap and easy to find (like an old computer).

PWM speed controllers are still the best option since you can tweak the speed of the motor without sacrificing any torque. They pulse the full voltage on and off at an adjustable rate, but in doing so most cause the motor to make noise too.
I know what your saying, just pointing out it can handle 15A continous, meaning it should be able to handle the most extreme conditions for a high torque motor given the right supply.
 
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