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A 1 man army of darkness
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Well there are several ways of doing so, including jack screws, rack & pinion assemblies, and a few others. The easiest of which for the home haunter, is this.


20.JPG


Substitute the words in the attached picture: "hinge" for "hole with a bolt through it", & "bearing" for "cabinet drawer slide", and there you go. :) A simple way to convert rotary motion to linear motion. Good luck with your project, and if you need any suggestions or clarification, feel free to ask.
 

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black light queen
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could be wrong, but i always thought that if these types of motors stall out (by hitting a stop, or working to hard) that they'll automatically reverse direction, thus go up and then down

maybe someone else can chime in and correct me if i am wrong or share their experience with these motors



amk
 

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I have used large rubber bands to connect such a motor to the item to be moved. It seems to provide some "Slack" needed for a motor weaker than you actually need to complete the cycle of events, rather than just seeing the motor come to a stop.
 

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A 1 man army of darkness
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2,586 Posts
could be wrong, but i always thought that if these types of motors stall out (by hitting a stop, or working to hard) that they'll automatically reverse direction, thus go up and then down

maybe someone else can chime in and correct me if i am wrong or share their experience with these motors



amk

You're thinking of the reindeer motors, their the ones that auto reverse upon stalling. ;) The rotisserie's, at least all that I've seen, use a Dayton style AC gear motor which has a lot more torque, and don't reverse at all. It's the same type of motor that is heavily favored for FCG's, just a bit higher on RPM's (around 15-20 rpm typically) than you'd use for an FCG.


I've got a few of them, & have been using one in my cauldron creep for a few years now in conjunction w/ an AC motor speed control that you can get from Harbor Freight. Keep an eye out for people throwing away old rotisserie's, it's usually the heating elements that burn out, and the motors are usually still in good-to-perfect condition.


Unfortunately, most people don't clean them very well, so it's a bit of a messy job to extract them sometimes. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well there are several ways of doing so, including jack screws, rack & pinion assemblies, and a few others. The easiest of which for the home haunter, is this.


View attachment 169170


Substitute the words in the attached picture: "hinge" for "hole with a bolt through it", & "bearing" for "cabinet drawer slide", and there you go. :) A simple way to convert rotary motion to linear motion. Good luck with your project, and if you need any suggestions or clarification, feel free to ask.
I've never used a rotisserie kit before and finally got a chance to look it over. I thought it was just a matter of hooking things up differently but now I think the only part that used from this kit is the motor. Is that right? I don't know where to buy the rotating shaft or the other parts in the picture. I asked a few guys in the family but they didn't know either. So I guess it's beyond me - at least for this year. My levitating bride will just have to hang there. Thanks for your help, though.
 

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A 1 man army of darkness
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Hi Palladino, would you mind posting a pic of the motor in question? Second question is, did you source the motor from a rotisserie oven, or is the "kit" you're speaking of the add-on type for a grille? Just an fyi, the former is the better option, should you want to power another project later on. But, we'll see if I can come up w/ something to make whatever you have work. :)
 

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A 1 man army of darkness
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You're very welcome! :) It's a pretty simple project to set this one up the way you need it. Since I don't know your experience level personally, I'll explain step by step, in case you're not so familiar with tooling or fabrication procedures. No offense intended... :)


The only downside is that this method will generate a lot of movement with the rig shown above, simply due to the length of arm needed, accounting for the necessary twist to get the bar stock oriented correctly. You'll see what I mean a little later in the post.




Basically, you'll need:



- A hacksaw, dremel with a cut-off wheel, jigsaw with a metal cutting blade, sawzall (again w/ a metal cutting blade), pneumatic cut off tool, or any of about 20 other tools that can handle cutting through metal.


- A drill with a 5/16" drill bit, preferably a tungsten carbide or cobalt nitride coated bit, but a standard M2 high speed steel will do in a pinch. Albeit the latter will, comparatively speaking, dull pretty quickly when drilling through metal. Also, avoid Ti nitride coated bit's for metal work.


- A vise, clamps, or other method for securing the aluminum so it can be bent (twisted 90 degrees, really). You'll also need a long handled pair of linesman pliers or handy seamers (seamers are preferable here, they'll cause little to no damage to the aluminum) to grab the other end with to twist the aluminum.


- A single U-bolt sized to fit around the skewer


- A 1' length of 1/8" x 3/4" flat aluminum bar stock (HD or Lowes carries it).


- A syringe of Devcon, tubes of JB Weld (not the Quik Weld, that stuff is junk for anything that undergoes structural stress), or other strong epoxy adhesive.


- (2) 1/4" lock washers.





First, be sure to get the parts before doing anything else, and take the skewer with you to make sure the U-bolt will fit around it in-store. ;) Sorry, most people would forget, so here's a preemptive reminder, just in case. Lol! :p


Next, you'll want to drill a couple of holes in one end of the aluminum bar stock, the same width apart as the U-bolt. It helps if you don't have access to a drill press, to use a hammer & punch/nail set/or a plain old nail to make an indention in the aluminum before trying to drill it. That will keep your bit from walking around, & keep your holes centered.


Then, slide the skewer into the motor portion, and clamp the aluminum bar to the skewer with the U-bolt, lock washers & included nuts . Use a Sharpie or other permanent marker to mark the skewer flush with the aluminum bar stock. That will be your cut line on the skewer.


Take the skewer, and cut it off at the line with whatever cutting tool you have at your disposal.


Now, put the end of the skewer that's left back in the hole of the motor assembly, and mark it again, as close as you can get to the end of the motor. Mix up the epoxy, and give the end of the skewer a thin coat, then push it back into place. Make certain that no excess epoxy squeezes out into the motor housing, that can be a potential disaster, so take care here. Then put it aside & wait at least 24 hours for it to fully cure.


Next, grab that piece of aluminum bar stock, clamp it down securely, in a vise or with clamps. You'll want to grab it with the pliers or handy seamer's, about 2 1/2 - 3" past the point where you actually want the 90 degree twist. And you will also want the twist to be about 1" away from the bolt hole for the U-bolt.


Now, you'll actually need to twist it more than 90 degrees when you do so, because the metal will spring back just a bit. Go slowly here, and make sure it's pretty close to a perfect 90 degree twist when your finished. Give it a twist to what looks like 90 degrees to begin with. Inspect it, and you'll find you have a bit more to go. Give it another little twist, check the angle, and repeat until it's satisfactory to you. Like so:



DSC02543.jpg



Now clamp the opposite end (from the U-bolt holes) back down, grab it with the pliers/seamers & bend it first up at a rough 45 degree angle, then a slight bit farther down, repeat that bend in the opposite direction forming a loose "Z". The goal is for the flat surface where you mount your pivot point to be above the improvised motor shaft. A.k.a. - the skewer Roughly, like this...



Capture.PNG


Then, attach the end to the rest of the diagram I posted earlier. Hope that helps you out ;)
 
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