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I have been searching the forum trying to find out information on how to create lenticular portraits so I can use my own family portraits and morph them for Halloween. I believe I know how but some guidance would be great. I found lenticular lenses on ebay but there are 50 LPI, 70 LPI, etc. They cost around $16 for 10 5x7's. I think I read somewhere that the more LPI (lenticulars per inch) the better for handheld/closeup photos. They say they have adhesive on the back. I assume I could use photoshop to create the photos but I am not sure how easy that is or what steps to take. Any help would be appreciated. Tips on morphing the photos would also be nice.

Thanks in advance,
 

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I have been searching the forum trying to find out information on how to create lenticular portraits so I can use my own family portraits and morph them for Halloween. I believe I know how but some guidance would be great. I found lenticular lenses on ebay but there are 50 LPI, 70 LPI, etc. They cost around $16 for 10 5x7's. I think I read somewhere that the more LPI (lenticulars per inch) the better for handheld/closeup photos. They say they have adhesive on the back. I assume I could use photoshop to create the photos but I am not sure how easy that is or what steps to take. Any help would be appreciated. Tips on morphing the photos would also be nice.

Thanks in advance,
It's not as easy as all that, Photoshop wont cut it for this effect, there's actually a special (read that as very expensive) software package for doing this, then you have to line the lenticular lenses up perfectly with the image, or it wont work at all.
 

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LPI = lines per inch. This is a traditional printing term that refers to the lines per inch when printing an image using varying dot sizes. The more lines per inch the more the image will look like a solid image closer up. If you use a magnifying glass and look at some printed images from different types of printed publications you will see the lines. Probably easiest to see in a grayscale image so you are only seeing black dots.

I haven't done anything with LPI since the 80s when desktop publishing. I vaguely remember having to set the LPI when using images in PageMaker. But honestly it was so long ago and PageMaker isn't even around any more as a software package. I also haven't used Photoshop for quite a long time. When you have your image scanned in, check out any advanced print settings for setting the LPI. How you could get the two images interlaced to print as one however I have no idea. And the lense would have to be precisely positioned for the images to work.
 

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BTW your question intrigued me and I found a Texas company that can do lenticular printing with no minimum quantities (assume companies use the vast bulk of lenticular printing, as opposed to individuals). Have no idea what kind of cost a one up would run but here's their website: http://www.rwcdigitalgraphics.com/rwc_1.html

They have guidelines posted for taking photos and sending your Photoshoped images to them.
 

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I guess the short, just-to-play-with-it, non-digital version would be this: Get your two portraits. Print them out the exact same dimensions (5x8 inches, for example). Now, cut each picture into an even number of vertical strips (8 or 10 for now). Alternating the strips, paste them down on paper, edges just about touching. Fold along the edges like an accordian. When you look at it from the left, it will be picture A. From the right, picture B.
I don't know how to slice a digital image on the computer. I am old and technically challenged. But if you understand photo imaging software, you could do the slicing on the PC and print it out. Then just fold and mount. You would get better results with a higher number of slices, but this is pretty much the basic idea of how to do it cheaply. The higher resolution the better, of course. No need to line up images, because the entire picture is different from each viewing angle.
Like I said, this is not the high-tech, professional quality way to do it. But it gives the basic idea. There was a freeware program about ten years ago called Lentikit, but it never got updated. If it is still around it may be helpful. Or not.
 

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I remember I meant to do some stuff with DIY lenticular images but never got around to it. After reading your post, I thought to myself of how I would do it and then researched to see if it would work.

I found a tutorial that explains it exactly how I thought to try it, I think its the most simple and easy. plus cheap.

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Lenticular-Prints-With-Photoshop

FYI, I have a BFA in computer animation and have been working with Photoshop since nearly the beginning of its inception. I would love to see your work if you use the above tutorial. :)
 

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I wish I understood Photoshop. I downloaded Paint.net, but after three years, still don't know how to do squat. Actually, I don't quite understand mechanical pencils. I am tech-challenged.
I do know how to read an actual hard-copy book, though ;-)
 

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This is the software I used. It was pretty easy once I screwed the first couple up trying to line them up.

http://lenticularimagecreator.com/index.html

I bought some lenticular lens from a company that I believe was out of California. I don't remember who it was, I'd have to go find the box they came in. You can find some in various sizes on Amazon by searching for "lenticular lens"

The key to being successful is to put the proper LPI in the software for your lens. I just printed them the photos in black and white on regular paper, since I was going for an old photo look anyways. Then you have to just carefully line up the photo with the lens. The lens typically have a sticky back to adhere to the photo, and you usually only get one shot at it.

Oh and this site helps you pick the right type of lens for what you are trying to acheive.

http://www.microlens.com/pages/choosing_right_lens.htm
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all of the responses. I requested a quote from RWC Digital Graphics and will report back with what they respond with. I found a website (prior to posting this) but haven't watched the tutorial entirely let. It says that you can do lenticular images (using interlacing) in CS4 Photoshop. The tutorial is Basic 3D Lenticular How-To. I believe this requires a plugin or something (from his site). There are other tutorials on the site at http://russellbrown.com/3D.html.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I received a response for the lenticular portraits from RWC Digital Graphics.

"One time set-up fee is $40.00, which includes online proofs. The 5” x 7” lenticular prints will cost $12.00 for 1 qty., $10.00 ea. for 5 qty. and $6.00 ea. for 10 qty. The 8” x 10” lenticular prints will cost $28.00 for 1 qty., $20.00 ea. for 5 qty. and $14.00 ea. for 10 qty."

To purchase the lenticular 5x7 lenses on ebay it is about $1.60 each (qty 10). Then the work to get the photos lenticular ready via photoshop or other means, photo paper, etc. Depending on the quality of photo paper it may cost around $0.25-$0.40/sheet.

Summary:

DIY: $2 each 5x7 (10 qty) = $20
RWC: $10 each 5x7 (10 qty) = $100

For me it is still a bit too much at $100 entry but it would be very cool to have scary lenticulars of your family during your halloween party. I assume one might be able to shop around and get the price down a bit more for the professional printed version but shipping would make it more expensive depending on where the print shop is located to you.
 

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Thanks for sharing what you learned. The RWC pricing is actually less than I expected but given how many prints you need it can add up. I'd say if you have the time to play around and feel you can handle the computer files, try the DIY route. The RWC is always an option and if budget is tight right now and you can still justify having the photos of your family long-term (it is a cool and probably heirloom kind of thing to do), spread it out over time and by next year you'll have a complete set.

And by all means please post back here with any DIY attempts you make. I'm sure others will be following this thread as well.
 
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