Halloween Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been making pillars for my cemetery fence and I have an inset with river rock and a femur bone. They are made from a mold and are of various materials (foam, plaster, etc.) as I was experimenting. Problem is - I put 2 layers of outdoor decoupage on them and they look really shiny, almost plastic. I am wondering the best way to make them look matte again, like bone. Before the decoupage they look great. The reason that I chose to decoupage them rather than just use a sealant is because I was trying to achieve further adhesion to the board that they are glued to. Powder? Matte spray? What would be the best thing to do here without starting over? Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
If worst comes to worst - scrub them with a green pad/steel wool. I've also heard that hand sanitizer works.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SLCGirl

·
It's pronounced "Fronkensteen."
Joined
·
699 Posts
Ivory flat spray paint, and some dark wood stain / wipe off. gives a flat aged look. a light sanding or steel wool would help rough the surface for both finish and paint bonding would help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The one on the left is (obviously) the one mounted that I thought looked plastic. The one on the right is a plaster and painted which looks like I want. I don’t have a picture of before I tried to correct it. I used a combination of things posted here and this is where I am. I tried alcohol and vinegar which both just made it tacky again and started to remove the paint. I then went with a Scotch pad and carefully buffed it. I then touched up the paint and did 2 coats of matte varnish. Does it look plastic to you? Is there anything else I can or should do?
746354
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
130 Posts
I agree with @matrixmom. I've run into something similar before. Just spray it with matte clear coat. I use Krylon. Just make sure whatever you use is compatible with the paint that's on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
I have read (but never tried) that you can dust a still-wet item with powdered sugar (aka icing sugar) and it will turn it into a matte finish. Once the piece is dried you can knock off the excess and rinse with water.

As for feedback on the bones themselves ... I like a wee bit more age on my bones. You may be going for a not-buried look. I go for the 'freshly pulled from grave' look myself. This gentleman started from a $30 skelly wiped down quickly with Rustoleum Satin Nutmeg (spray a swipe down one arm, count to 2, wipe off with paper towel to make it look streaky). His face wound up a little dark so I dry brushed a bit of ivory to restore his features. The spray paint lost any shine it may have had when I wiped it down while wet. It dries fast, so I literally do one arm, one leg, one ribcage at a time before wiping each one down.

746363
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have read (but never tried) that you can dust a still-wet item with powdered sugar (aka icing sugar) and it will turn it into a matte finish. Once the piece is dried you can knock off the excess and rinse with water.

As for feedback on the bones themselves ... I like a wee bit more age on my bones. You may be going for a not-buried look. I go for the 'freshly pulled from grave' look myself. This gentleman started from a $30 skelly wiped down quickly with Rustoleum Satin Nutmeg (spray a swipe down one arm, count to 2, wipe off with paper towel to make it look streaky). His face wound up a little dark so I dry brushed a bit of ivory to restore his features. The spray paint lost any shine it may have had when I wiped it down while wet. It dries fast, so I literally do one arm, one leg, one ribcage at a time before wiping each one down.

View attachment 746363
That looks great! I think that I'm timid about aging them since it's my first go-round. Thank you for the inspiration to be more aggressive. I read about the powder trick after it was dry. You can see on the "stones" how shiny they are. The bone was a little less than that as I have added some gloss to them to make them look more like river rock and to contrast them with the bone. Maybe I will try to do a bit more aging, spray it with another coat of varnish, then hit it with powder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
The one on the left is (obviously) the one mounted that I thought looked plastic. The one on the right is a plaster and painted which looks like I want. I don’t have a picture of before I tried to correct it. I used a combination of things posted here and this is where I am. I tried alcohol and vinegar which both just made it tacky again and started to remove the paint. I then went with a Scotch pad and carefully buffed it. I then touched up the paint and did 2 coats of matte varnish. Does it look plastic to you? Is there anything else I can or should do? View attachment 746354
Ok it looks like you have a variety of materials (plaster castings, tumbled river rock and extruded foam) with different densities that you want to apply a finish that will have a dull matte finish. Am I right so far? The first thing I would do is spray the entire prop with an acrylic primer (Rust-Oleum Painter's Touch 2X Ultra Cover Spray Primer, Flat, White). Do not use an oil based primer or the finish will be sticky / shiny and it will melt the foam. The acrylic primer will adhere to all the materials you are using and provide an even, mate finish base coat to apply your finish paints. Next apply a base coat of exterior latex paint over the primer. You can use any brand you want but I typically use Behr (paint) or Behr Ultra (prime + paint). For the finish paints you can use either exterior latex or acrylic paints or a combination of them as both are water based. I typically dilute the finish paints with water 50/50. If you want an aged antique look (reference photos) apply a light beige / khaki color using a sponge or sponge brush and pat dry (don't rub or it will make it look shiny). Then apply a medium or dark brown in the same manor (stay away from browns that have a redish tint), make the edges and recessed areas darker. Then apply a spray sealer (Rust-Oleum Painters Touch 2X Ultra Cover Matte Clear), again this can be used on all the materials that you are using. Follow this process and it will provide you with a water resistant, matte finish.

746399

acrylic primer

746400

finish painting with acrylic paints

746401

completed props with matte sealant - no shine

746402

installed prop with lighting - still no shine
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok it looks like you have a variety of materials (plaster castings, tumbled river rock and extruded foam) with different densities that you want to apply a finish that will have a dull matte finish. Am I right so far? The first thing I would do is spray the entire prop with an acrylic primer (Rust-Oleum Painter's Touch 2X Ultra Cover Spray Primer, Flat, White). Do not use an oil based primer or the finish will be sticky / shiny and it will melt the foam. The acrylic primer will adhere to all the materials you are using and provide an even, mate finish base coat to apply your finish paints. Next apply a base coat of exterior latex paint over the primer. You can use any brand you want but I typically use Behr (paint) or Behr Ultra (prime + paint). For the finish paints you can use either exterior latex or acrylic paints or a combination of them as both are water based. I typically dilute the finish paints with water 50/50. If you want an aged antique look (reference photos) apply a light beige / khaki color using a sponge or sponge brush and pat dry (don't rub or it will make it look shiny). Then apply a medium or dark brown in the same manor (stay away from browns that have a redish tint), make the edges and recessed areas darker. Then apply a spray sealer (Rust-Oleum Painters Touch 2X Ultra Cover Matte Clear), again this can be used on all the materials that you are using. Follow this process and it will provide you with a water resistant, matte finish.

View attachment 746399
acrylic primer

View attachment 746400
finish painting with acrylic paints

View attachment 746401
completed props with matte sealant - no shine

View attachment 746402
installed prop with lighting - still no shine
Those look great! Thank you for the advice. Those aren't river rocks, though. Those are blobs of Great Stuff that I painted to look like river rock. I will put up some pictures when I get them done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
Wow, I completely thought those were real river rock. They look amazing! I was wondering how you adhered them since they are pretty non-porous and heavy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A finished panel! Thank you everyone for your help. I now need to put it on the column and Drylock it (the pink part).
747028
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
A finished panel! Thank you everyone for your help. I now need to put it on the column and Drylock it (the pink part).
So what did you finally do? look great by the way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So what did you finally do? look great by the way.
I sanded down the decoupage coating that I had, aged it more with brown paint and stain, sprayed it with matte sealer, lightly sanded again and coated again. I also grouted between the “stones” and touched up their color as well as adding some shiny decoupage sealant to them. The next ones will go much, much faster now that I have a process in place. In fact, I already have another one about half done.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top