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Discussion Starter #1
I have looked through the forum and haven't seen any ideas about what I can do to keep the paint on my PVC fence posts. I sanded, then primed with Kilz. I painted them with outdoor paint. But they scratch off way too easily for what I have done. Slight knocks or scratches seem to take it off. Any help would be appreciated. Am I thinking maybe a varnish or sealer of some sort?
 

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I got the PVC stain (something like rekhoil?) that you mix with PVC solvent. It works, but it took a number of coats to make a deep black/brown color. Luckily drips and runs just look like age. It is durable but it's not as perfect as a can of black spray paint. Just a thought ... it depends on the look you want. Touchups with matte black paint each year might not be the worst plan.
 

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An observation about stain ---- in 2014 I applied it with a sock. It took one coat and penetrated so deeply that a wack from the weedeater would not expose the white pvc pipe. Later as I started taking over neighbor's yards, using the same stain, solvent, and pvc pipe it takes more than one coat and some residual stain comes off in my hand even years latter. At first I though it might be dirty pipe but I suspect that something has changed over the years with the solvent, stain, or pipe.
 

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PVC has that light shiny coating on it like many plastics do. To do it "right" you should sand that coating off & then the paint will stick to the plastic underneath - but I realize that's not always practical. I can't imagine sanding every fence post in my 90+ linear feet of fencing. It's more than 200 PVC pipes!

I just buy the $0.99 matte black stray paint from Home Depot and just touch it up every year. One can per season is plenty.
 

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Just remember, pvc (and most plastics) flex. So make sure your paint has some flex as well. If you notice with car bumpers/plastic parts, the paint usually is mixed with an additive that gives it flex when in dries. Even then, it can still crack.

I have not tried the PVC stain, but that would seem to be a better option then straight paint.

The Krylon Fusion line I think has some flexing agent mixed in it for use on plastics.


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Discussion Starter #10
PVC has that light shiny coating on it like many plastics do. To do it "right" you should sand that coating off & then the paint will stick to the plastic underneath - but I realize that's not always practical. I can't imagine sanding every fence post in my 90+ linear feet of fencing. It's more than 200 PVC pipes!

I just buy the $0.99 matte black stray paint from Home Depot and just touch it up every year. One can per season is plenty.
I have sanded the whole thing, which took some time, let me tell you! I made a jig and hooked it up to my drill to make it faster.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the replies. I am not going to strip it and repaint with anything else this year, so I will just have to be touching up. I will maybe get the Krylon Fusion and over time it will be more Fusion then regular ol' paint. I have already put SO. MUCH. TIME. into it and will continue to make it more amazing after Halloween. I just need to get the dang thing up as it has taken a lot more time than the tutorials make it look. 😰
 

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I just need to get the dang thing up as it has taken a lot more time than the tutorials make it look. 😰
It will look awesome. If you see any flaws that jump out a TON just hit them with a sharpie or something to knock it back. A lot of things seem to take longer than those darn tutorials lead you to believe.
 

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As mentioned, krylon fusion is made for plastic application. Rustoleum also has a line for plastic application. Both hold up very well on plastic. You’re looking at 4x the cost per can vs the cheapest option, but it actually works.
 

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I had some regular black exterior paint that picked up off the oops rack. I did a terrible job just painting the hell out of my pipes with it. I rolled it on too think and it dripped and some of it stuck to the paper under it. It gave an interesting texture to say the least. Kind of like an old fence that people just kept painting over the rust and damage and not actually taking the time to do it right. It rarely chips and when it does it's very small spots, but I think I went and touched it up a bit last year. I'm just super lazy.
I've thought about staining or taking the time to really do it right with sanding and such. However, I like the rough look that my pipes now. It gives it life and realism. I think the pipes being perfectly smooth and painted would look too fake. I suppose adding details after the base coat would help a bit (like fake rust and such), but it would probably still look a bit flat unless you added actual texture.
For the record I use a very simple pole and chain fence. In the off season I store the poles the together in a narrow tote bag (technically a laundry sorter bag) and cart it around that way. Like I said, the poles rarely chip even stored together and jostled around on their trips to and from storage. One of these years I will actually get around to adding the finials...
 

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you have a few options. spray the fence with super 77 spray adhesive and let that dry before painting that really helps
Or you can paint it with contact cement thinned with xylene to prime it before painting
Or you can actually prime with the Purple PVC primer meant for PVC, then paint it with the plasic spray paint that holds up pretty well also
 

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Sand it, wipe it down with acetone , then paint. The acetone will clean off any dirt and grease on the pipe and will also swell it slightly making it more porous and accepting of paint.
 
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I just painted with rust-oleum prime and paint I’m one spray . No prep Still looks great after 5 years .
 

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I just used a flat black latex paint on mine. It was a gallon of premixed paint from Menard's. 10+ years and going strong. I slopped it on with a small roller. It has held up pretty well.
 

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I sanded, then primed with Kilz. I painted them with outdoor paint.
From my experience with PVC, you actually took the wrong approach to painting your fence. Regular Kilz primer is not formulated for plastic. They do have a special Kilz that is supposed to work as a plastic primer, but unless you used KILZ Adhesion Bonding Primer, you more than likely put something over your plastic that is part of the reason it scratches so easily. Unless you're willing to sand it all back to the PVC, the fence will probably always be a bit iffy about scratching. Using a spray paint specifically made to act as primer and paint for plastic is probably your best option for a quick fix. Set up the fence and then spray areas that need touching up. It's only for a few days each year, so it seems a bit of overkill to repaint the entire project if a few touch ups will do the trick.
 
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