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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everyone, new to this forum but I've read a lot of good information in the past.

I am looking into hooking up a 12 volt timer module to the demo button of Halloween props.

I am have a basic understanding of electric but I am able to follow instructions and put together circuits. I 'm simply unsure how to get the module hooked up to the prop.

On one side of the module there 3 nodes: the + and - and the N.O.
On the other C, NO, NC

I tried connecting the 12 v to the + and - and then the two wires from the button to C and No but it does not work. I'm sure this will be easy for some of you.

Thank you,

Charles
 

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Hello Everyone, new to this forum but I've read a lot of good information in the past.

I am looking into hooking up a 12 volt timer module to the demo button of Halloween props.

I am have a basic understanding of electric but I am able to follow instructions and put together circuits. I 'm simply unsure how to get the module hooked up to the prop.

On one side of the module there 3 nodes: the + and - and the N.O.
On the other C, NO, NC

I tried connecting the 12 v to the + and - and then the two wires from the button to C and No but it does not work. I'm sure this will be easy for some of you.

Thank you,

Charles
Some try Buttons using NC. Try it. And second wire to C -common. Polarity don't matter.

Make sure your module works. Can you post pic


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Put an ohm meter on NO and C, and then turn on the timer. When it triggers, resistance should go to 0 for a brief second. If it goes to 0 and holds there, your prop is likely seeing the switch as stuck and is ignoring the "button press".
 

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Hello Everyone, new to this forum but I've read a lot of good information in the past.

I am looking into hooking up a 12 volt timer module to the demo button of Halloween props.

I am have a basic understanding of electric but I am able to follow instructions and put together circuits. I 'm simply unsure how to get the module hooked up to the prop.

On one side of the module there 3 nodes: the + and - and the N.O.
On the other C, NO, NC

I tried connecting the 12 v to the + and - and then the two wires from the button to C and No but it does not work. I'm sure this will be easy for some of you.

Thank you,

Charles
Does the relay click? + is plus voltage, minus is ground, N.C. is most likely "no contact", but a picture would help. Button goes to NO for "normally open" and C for common". The timer should pull the relay in. There should be a potentiometer to adjust with a screwdriver to set the interval.

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Discussion Starter #7
Hello,

I've been trying to include a picture but for some reason. I did not load. IMG_3845.jpg

I am getting a reading of 12 V when putting on the + and -
No change when setting the ohm meter

IMG_3843.jpg
 

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One side you have the supply side, 12-24 vdc, (polarity matters!) positive to +, negative to -, the trigger is negative (or to ground), so your step pad or switch "sensor" goes between "T" and ground. So when someone steps on the pad, there is a 2-15 second delay and the relay switches.

The other side is for power, C is common, NO normally open, NC normally closed.

For DC, then you can switch either the positive or negative.
Let's say you switch positive, then your ground would go to the ground on your prop.
The positive wire of your prop needs to be cut, with the supply side going to the common and the load side going to the NO.

For a DEMO button, you would put one wire to C and the other to NO. You will still need to trigger it for the cycle to start.
So, what you have is okay, but it won't start the cycle until it is triggered. If you put a wire out of "T" and then you can touch it to ground, this should start the timer cycle, and you'll see a response in 2-15 seconds.

The potentiometer, (the square blue thing with the white "screw" in the middle of the module) adjusts the timer from 2-15 seconds. Use a small screwdriver and carefully adjust it so it's in the middle and see what the delay is. Then adjust CW/CCW to the time you like.
 

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NC on a relay stands for Normally Closed.
Sorry, I misread. He said there were 3 contacts on the INPUT. And I thought he said N.C. instead of N.O. which might have been no connection. But it might be an optional trigger as I have seen on some of these boards, which would be a normally open switch contact.

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So is this one just a one shot delay timer? The ones I found for someone else today run in a loop or have a trigger option. They have 2 pots, one for the interval and one for the duration of the pulse or length of time the circuit is held. Those are great for warning flash signs or alarms like in a zombie containment area or for having something do a 2 second scare every 5 minutes.



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So is this one just a one shot delay timer? The ones I found for someone else today run in a loop or have a trigger option. They have 2 pots, one for the interval and one for the duration of the pulse or length of time the circuit is held. Those are great for warning flash signs or alarms like in a zombie containment area or for having something do a 2 second scare every 5 minutes.
 

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As far as I know, this is not a loop. It triggers when the momentary switch is released. The cycle starts. Adjustable delay of 2-15 seconds. It's a SPDT (single pole double throw) relay. That is all I know. I have never used one nor do I intend to. But if the "delay" is an on/off cycle, like a flashing light, that would be cool, but I believe this is a delay timer for security purposes. Probably used to "buzz" someone in, the timer for the solenoid latch release of a security door or such. You would hit a momentary switch, the solenoid would unlatch for the delay duration, then shut off. This way you cannot hold the solenoid active for too long of a time and melt the crap out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
As far as I know, this is not a loop. It triggers when the momentary switch is released. The cycle starts. Adjustable delay of 2-15 seconds. It's a SPDT (single pole double throw) relay. That is all I know. I have never used one nor do I intend to. But if the "delay" is an on/off cycle, like a flashing light, that would be cool, but I believe this is a delay timer for security purposes. Probably used to "buzz" someone in, the timer for the solenoid latch release of a security door or such. You would hit a momentary switch, the solenoid would unlatch for the delay duration, then shut off. This way you cannot hold the solenoid active for too long of a time and melt the crap out of it.
Thank you for your help. Much appreciated.
It is indeed not on a loop.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I usually used the Vellman 136 module but it is harder to get in Canada and the local shop here advised me to use this timer. I had a feeling it wouldn?t work because there?s only a delay and no pause setting. I will use it for something else.

On a different note. What would be a good solution ( for next year ) to link a series of these props together on one central unit ?
 

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You may need what's known as a Pull-up Resistor (10K ohm) in series between the timer and the (+)Input of the relay board.

Last year I picked up a few 12-30VDC industrial photoelectric sensors for my Haunt. I wired one up to the coil side of my 12VDC relay and I was quite frustrated when it didn't activate the relay. I added the pull-up resistor and it drew enough current to excite the opto-isolator side of the relay.

Hope this helps.
 

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Suggesting an idea.

Use a simple DC solenoid to activate the switch. Wire the swtich's leads to the solenoid, then remotely control the solenoid with your control voltage.
 
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