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Discussion Starter #1
Last year I made PVC candles for the first time and loved the way they came out! I used PVC insulation to fill the inside and support the led candles on the top. This year I plan to make probably about one-two dozen more. However, I want to try something new with them. Due to the rain we receive in my area throughout the year, I can't leave some props out during the season until the night of TOT, the led candles being one of those props. I'd love to find a way to make it so the candles can be lit each night, rain or shine, and also hooked up to the timer we have going, so I don't have to turn each one on individually each night. Not really sure how to go about doing this, especially because the candles are spread out across the yard. Any ideas how to go about doing this?
 

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Are they turned on by a flip switch or push button? If they are flip switches you can wire them to run off a power supply (proper voltage and enough amps to cover all of them combined). Have the main power supply hooked to the timer and you'll be good to go. I'm assuming where you mentioned turning on each one, they are still battery powered.
 

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Agreed -- running a wire to them is by far the easiest way of doing it. Unless your yard is bigger than most it shouldn't be cost prohibitive, especially when you compare it to replacing batteries in each candle over the course of the season.

I'd suggest running the power line at 9 to 12 volts and using a resistor in each individual candle to drop the voltage to what the LED needs. You will also want to consider building it in a modular form, so that individual candles can be unplugged/replaced without having to bust out a soldering iron in your yard.

I've found hot glue and epoxy work rather well for sealing things against the elements. Black hot glue is available if the seal is going to be in a visible place.
 

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Yes, they're battery operated. They're just the little battery operated tea lights you can find at the dollar store
 

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I have been obsessed with making these candles and having them "float" out above my driveway, but I haven't seen anything posted online about it. Outside, I mean. Since they would be hanging I don't want to have to individually turn them on and off, so I've been looking into tea lights like crazy. I have used the dollar store tea lights outside in little metal jack O'lanterns. The weather doesn't seem to do anything to them. You can buy tea lights with timers. You turn them on at the time of day you want, and they stay on 6 hours, then off for 18 hours, on for 6 and so on. I've seen them online, but haven't actually bought them. Some of them actually say they can be used outside. They won't be dollar store priced though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Still good to know, l bought the PVC and insulation today that I need for them. I'll have to look those up and see what they're about! I'd love to have the candles lit every night
 

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I have quite a few of the timer tealights and a few votives. Like you I hated walking around turning everything on. First year I tried them worked like a charm. As it got later into October (and our rainy season) I noticed more and more of them not working. Figured the batteries were dead but noticed when talking them apart they were rusting and wet inside. I got most of them working again by drying them out but just a heads up that the candles fill with rain and tend to stay wet. I've since also purchased the outdoor listed ones and same thing. The top is more protected but not the bottom where the batteries are. If you do try them I strongly suggest figuring out how to protect the bottom. I've since just resorted to leaving them unlit and putting the tealights out just a couple days prior to Halloween night.
 

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As far as waterproofing goes, I find that sealing the area around the led with hot glue provides adequate moisture protection. If you want to power the candles with a power supply you can use a 5 volt dc wall wart type adapter to power quite a few lights. You would need to place a resistor in line with the positive lead of your candle to reduce the voltage and limit the current to the candle led to keep it from burning out. There are numerous post on the forum for powering LEDs as well as LED resistor calculators on line to help. The tea light is powered from a button cell battery. Just check the voltage written on the battery and for reference, I use the current value of 20mA per LED. Plug these numbers into the LED calculator and you will have the size of the resistor you need. Be sure to note the wattage of the resistor the calculator recommends as this is important. If you cannot find a resistor of the exact value as the one the calculator suggests, use the one that matches as close as possible that is of a higher value. (do not use one of a lower value...bad things can happen) Hope this helps.
 

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c7 led's lightbulb sockets that have a plug, plugged into extension cords then to a timer. For waterproofing - put a plastic container on top. Must be led's....so it doesn't get hot... I keep the containers that led candles come in, and those are what I use for waterproofing my candles, lights, candelabra outside. .Here's a close up pic what they look like....these are bigger bulbs though....

http://www.halloweenforum.com/members/matrixmom-albums-pirates-life-for-me-2014-a-picture222721-now-ya-know-why-i-needed-1265-coins.html
 

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