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Kitchen/Green Witch
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Hmmm...Minwax stain doesn't usually take that long to dry. Did you sand the cabinets really good before you stained them? If you didn't sand them, and there was any finish on them to begin with, that finish could've been too waxy or such and the new stain won't fully dry correctly. The best I can say is to put them somewhere with warmth and air flow...maybe in a room with a heater going and the window open (or an exhaust vent going, if you have one)??
 

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Kitchen/Green Witch
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Oh, also, was it water based or oil based? Oil based can take a bit longer to dry, especially if it's humid. The age of the wax can affect drying, too...if it's old or not mixed properly, it can have a hard time curing.
 

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Valkyrie Of Halloween
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks WitchyKitty! No, I didn't sand it beforehand, I have never stained anything other than raw fresh stuff before. Should I sand it now? Or will it eventually dry? I think the minwax is old, I found it out in the garage, so at least over a year. It is oil based, I just checked the label.
If it is sunny would sitting it out in the sun do the trick? It has been in the 90s so is plenty warm.
 

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Halloween Elitist
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So which is the stain Alan Hopps uses for the corpsing? I don't think he mentions it but I bought oil based and it took forever to dry, I didn't know/think there was a latex stain. .
 

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Kitchen/Green Witch
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Thanks WitchyKitty! No, I didn't sand it beforehand, I have never stained anything other than raw fresh stuff before. Should I sand it now? Or will it eventually dry? I think the minwax is old, I found it out in the garage, so at least over a year. It is oil based, I just checked the label.
If it is sunny would sitting it out in the sun do the trick? It has been in the 90s so is plenty warm.
If you didn't sand it, and it already had a finish on it, then it may never dry (or may take a really long time), as it can't soak into the wood correctly. You need to sand off existing stains and varnishes, or the new stain can't get to the wood to stain it. Stain isn't like paint, it needs to soak in a bit, not just sit on top. It could also be that you put to thick of a coat of stain on and didn't wipe off the excess...or put coats on too qucikly, before the previous has dried.

**Check out that link I posted to you earlier from Minwax, they have explainations of what you can do in these situations. I have always sanded first, for myself, so I can't say, for sure, from experience if it will eventually dry or not. If it simply doesn't dry, you may need to take mineral spirits to remove as much of the sticky layer of stain as you can, then let it dry. If it looks okay, you can seal it, if it looks bad, then maybe sand and re-stain? I wish I could be of more help...here is the link again: https://www.minwax.com/how-to-finish-wood/faq/

The fourth and fifth questions asked on the FAQ page should give you some suggestions, the ones about the stains being tacky and not drying.
 

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Go over it with a spray can of polyurethane. You'll probably need at least 2 coats and you certainly won't have a furniture like finish if that's what you were gunning for. When the poly dries you should be able to sand as necessary.
 

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Sometimes if you do too many coats without proper drying time in between this can happen. If you have a dehumidifier , put it in the room, wipe down the seepage, seal the room and let the dehumidifier do it's job.
 
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