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Discussion Starter #1
So I am doing my first walk thru haunt this year and have already created about a dozen pallet walls. But alas, do not have enough pallets to finish my plan so I need to make about 14 more walls. I was going to use 2x4 lumber but then I found 1x2 lumber for half the price. Will 1x2 be sturdy enough for a haunt wall or is it better to just suck up the extra expense now and use 2x4 ?
 

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I personally dont have a home haunt but i was a carpenter for 10 years. The sturdiness depends on the load you will have on the walls. If you plan on using some lightweight material to cover them and not have any thing over a couple pounds tacked to the walls it should be ok to use 1x2. Using 1x2 will also be lighter so it should be a good option for a temp wall set up.

Just dont place alot of load pressure against them.
 

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Caretaker of Eerie Manor
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We use 2x3 studs covered with plywood. We like the added sturdiness as we get a lot of people going through and they tend to back into walls when they are scared lol! What are you planning to use for overlayment? As GC said, 1x2's will be fine for thin overlayment and not needing to support a heavy load. We do have a few covered in luan used in areas where no one is going to in contact wiith them. nice and light for setting up too!
 

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Thanks for the responses. I have 3 walls that will have a thin plywood covering (one with a drop panel - solid walls on either side in case someone freaks out) and one with a projected image, otherwise the rest will be all fabric covered walls. Perhaps I can get away with the cheaper wood for the fabric covered walls and then use 2x4's for the plywood walls.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
However : I will be bracing the walls on the top and tarping it so I don't get rained out. Maybe I should just use 2x4 all around to be safe.
 

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I once bought a lot of very cheap, thin doors ,25cents each. I guessed they would not be lasting very well, very long? three years later, being open every night, they were still here only maybe one broken.
I was not scaring people into these super-flimsey doors. I also like to think that not allowing screaming, staggering drunks to come in helps much too.
I built a voting booth maze with them. a few curtains hung for booth privacy. The politician ads showed identical maniacs holding big knives up to a person's throat. The candidate's were "Tweedle-dum" and "Tweedle-Dee".
I like to also think that because they are inside of my house, where we live, and because I believe that i treat my patrons with respect, that these things might also keep the place from getting trashed.
Save your thick walls for areas across from dramatic scares and you should be all right.
 

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This is what I do every year. I take a 2x4x8 stand it up, then take a 1x2x2 or cut plywood to this size. I drive them into the ground at about a 45 degree angle and screw it to the 2x4. Do this every 6 feet or so. Then I take flex strap used for hanging hvac duct work or you can use rope and staple them to the tops. The more crisis cross's you do the stronger it becomes. I then take a roll of 20' x 100' black plastic and cut it in half. This makes 2 pieces that is 10' x 100'. Take the plastic and form the walls. You'll have 8' walls and the 2' fall over the rope or flex strap and use black gorilla tape to tape it together.

I'll see where my pics are and post them up for a little better understanding.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks ReelSore, pics would be great if you can find them.


QUOTE=ReelSore;1950777]This is what I do every year. I take a 2x4x8 stand it up, then take a 1x2x2 or cut plywood to this size. I drive them into the ground at about a 45 degree angle and scream it to the 2x4. Do this every 6 feet or so. Then I take flex strap used for hanging hvac duct work or you can use rope and staple them to the tops. The more crisis cross's you do the strong it becomes. I then take a roll of 20' x 100' black plastic and cut it in half. This makes 2 pieces that is 10' x 100'. Take the plastic and form the walls. You'll have 8' walls and the 2' fall over the rope or flex strap and use black gorilla tape to tape it together.

I'll see where my pics are and post them up for a little better understanding.[/QUOTE]
 

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Caretaker of Eerie Manor
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Some pics of our walls and drop panel. Gives an idea of one method. WE used a vertical center brace on them since we obtained free plywood sheets that were cut to 1'x4'.













 

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If you look at the base of the 2x4 you will see the stobs at an angle. You will want that stob on the same side as where the pressure will be. It will seem real wobbly when you just have the stobs on them. They get stronger when you put the rope or flex strap on the top. Hope this helps.

It looks weak but after this Halloween 2014, we had rain for 3 days afterwards and not one wall or ceiling fell. I did poke some holes in the ceiling so the water could get through.

Oh and it will get confusing at times where the route actually is. This process is what I have used for years and will continue doing so. It's relatively cheap and doesn't take a lot of space when torn down. When you go to lowes or Home Depot or where ever, be sure to look at pine, treated pine, and the canfor. Sometimes the treated is cheaper than the other two. Recently the canfor has been the cheapest.
 

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If all the pics didn't show, you can go to my albums and look in the 2014 folder for them. I also pack up all the plastic and re use every year.

Your welcome.
 

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Oh and something else. If you don't cut the plastic and you use 8 feet 2x4's with a 3-4 feet width for a hallway it works out perfectly. 8' high + 4 feet width + 8' high = 20' or if you do 3 feet wide then you'll have 6" to "staple" down. For the "staples" along the bottom, I use cut up metal clothes hangers bent into a u shape.
 
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