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Clarification: Not A Man
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Odd question, I know.

If you've used an ice cream maker, you know that adding salt to the ice keeps the temperature down, and it helps stop the ice from rapidly fusing into one big lump.
So I wonder if adding salt to the ice in a fog chiller will help to keep the temps low and ice free, aiding the cooling effect.

If anyone has tried it, I'd like to know how well it worked and if it's worthwhile.
 

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Typical Ghoul Next Door
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I used to freeze water bottle using a water/salt mixture so they'd stay frozen longer, and then used the bottles to line/cover a metal tube that I used to make a chiller. They were still solid after 4 hours (and we typically have temps in the mid 70s). I wouldn't put salt in any way directly into the fogger, tho.
 

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Clarification: Not A Man
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't plan on putting it in the fogger directly, I've been fixing up foggers all week after pulling them out of storage, I'm not going to make more work for myself. :D

I recently finished a new chiller made from a plastic pickle barrel, Lurks figures it'll need 100lbs of ice to get a good layer for chilling. We've been debating using salt on the ice in the chiller after seeing Vortex branded 'volumizer crystals' to supercharge chillers. From the way the product effect is described [and how the 'crystals' look] it's rock salt.
 

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I have been salting my ice for a few years now. I think Froggy's fog gave the tip at a convention a while ago. I'm not sure if it helps or not because I have always been doing this ever since I built my first fog chiller, so I have nothing to compare it to. Froggy's said to put in a layer of ice and salt and repeat the steps until the container is full.
 

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I have been adding rock salt/ice cream salt to my fog chiller for four years. My cooler holds 50lbs of ice and I have never had to add more during the night. I just spread two small boxes across the top of the ice. It melts a top layer then refreezes the ice at a lower melting point. It works, but as mentioned earlier, pour the water out the next day in the street and not your lawn.

I am pretty sure that I had a thread about it last year somewhere with pics of my cooler. I know my profile page has an album of pics of my cooler chiller and my tagline video has the fog in action.
 

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I'm having a hard time understanding this. I know why salt keeps ice water colder, making it good for chilling things like beer in a cooler. But doesn't salt on ice without water actually speed up the melting process? That is why salt is placed on icy roads. So it seems in a fog chiller salt would have no effect. The fog is chilled by contact with the ice cubes. Any ice water from melt may be colder, but the fog won't penetrate the water so that would have no effect. Maybe just the fact the water is colder keeps the air in the chiller colder?
 

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Well first, some clarity is needed I think on what happens with salt water and the difference between the state of water and the temp of it.

Adding salt to water lowers the freezing temp. Basically meaning that instead of ice forming below 32 degrees F it drops down by something like 10 degrees. Salt does not change the state of ice, it changes the temp required for that change in state to occur.

Why is this good / bad? If you are talking about roads during the winter, salt is thrown onto the roads, the temp needed for ice changes, and if it's not cold enough you wind up with really cold water, rather than dangerous ice. Though there is a limit here, if the weather is colder than the new temp required to freeze, salt does nothing.

In terms of icecream, cream freezes at a lower temp than water, so you need to somehow chill it below what ice can do effectively. You add salt, the temp lowers, the heat from your cream is transferred away faster, and you get ice cream. This is why liquid nitrogen makes the best ice cream you've ever tasted, it's ultra cold and so can absorb all that heat without raising above the temp needed to freeze cream.

Now as far as a fog chiller goes, I would say that it would allow the ice to remain frozen slightly longer, and have some impact on the cooling of the fog. Though I imagine in both cases it would be pretty minimal due to the amount of time your fog actually spends in contact with it. Which means the only real benefit is likely to be slightly less ice used per night. An effect you could duplicate pretty well by using larger pieces of ice (bigger blocks = slower melting).

/2 cents
 

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This is a really cool question! (pun intended)

I think I will try this this year. I get the ice free from work, and I can get all the sea salt I want from work as well.

And lucky for me, I don't have to worry about my lawn since it is all dirt crap anyway. (Las Vegas, drought, you know.) :D
 
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