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Discussion Starter #1
Saw a news story on TV last night on this issue and came across this link today. If you bought non-prescription "halloween effects" type contacts to wear with your costume this year, you might want to read what they have to say before putting them in your eyes. Apparently enough people have had serious eye/vision issues by using them that these over-the-counter lenses have come under scrutiny. Here's one of many articles floating around this week on them:

http://www.10news.com/lifestyle/health/disgusting-eye-injuries-caused-by-counterfeit-contact-lenses-used-for-halloween-costumes-under-federal-investigation-102413
 

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Yeah a guy at my work had these. Nice hospital visit, completely infected his eye and swelled it shut. Wasn't pretty
 

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WOW. I didn't know a prescription was needed and certainly I've come across sites online selling them, and it didn't appear a prescription was required.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's the problem. Prescription lense sources will have a tight control on preventing bacteria in the contact solution etc, where as these other sources won't do any testing and not have sterile solutions. People tend to think if it's being sold it's probably OK or someone would have closed them down. The news story on my CBS channel also pointed out that the wide-eyed lenses were specifically not approved for use. Not sure why and that would have been interesting to know why.
 

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Here's an attention getter to drive home the point.

article-2048930-0E5D154000000578-857_306x254.jpg

There is no such thing as "one size fits all" contact lenses.

The practice of selling costume contact lenses without a prescription has been illegal since 2005. When contact lenses are not made according to FDA standards, the devices carry a risk of causing serious eye injuries such as cuts, open sores, corneal abrasions and ulcers. Some require surgery or transplants and cause vision loss. One study found a person using cosmetic contact lenses was 16 times more likely to develop keratitis than those who didn’t wear novelty lenses.

"What happens to people's eyes after just one evening of wearing non-prescription costume contact lenses is tragic," Thomas Steinemann, M.D., professor of ophthalmology, MetroHealth Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, said in a statement. “I understand how tempting it is to dress up your eyes on Halloween without a prescription and using over-the-counter lenses, but people should not let one night of fun ruin their vision for a lifetime."
 
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I knew about this. They are tempting but not worth it. Hell...my eyes started forming an allergic reaction to my regular prescription contacts :(
 

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i was looking into getting some contacts this year but was way too weary of getting non prescription ones... and cant really afford prescription ones right now... plus i dont even know what my script would be as i havent been to an eye doctor since.. .never. glad i didnt end up buying them after reading this.
 

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So says the eye doctor industry.
Yes I'm being a pessimist.
I do wear contacts it was the sterilizing solution preservitive that I became allergic to.
I now use this on both regular and Halloween contacts.
http://www.drugstore.com/clear-care-triple-action-cleaning-3-hydrogen-peroxide-cleaning-and-disinfecting-solution/qxp157502
before I put them in. even fresh out of the package.
It's not just the "cleaning". One woman put some in and they "suction cupped" to her eyeballs. Again, there's no one size fits all approach to contact lenses. They're supposed to be made for your eye measurements, and everyone is different (curvature, etc).
 

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i get my rx theatrical or colored i.e. black, orange,green,red,neon blue,purple,gray
from visiondirect.com they do sell theatrical lenses that are not rx. they are a great site i would recommend them. as with everything its user error not taking out contacts after 8hrs the eye needs to breath even with rx contacts. using the proper cleaning and rinsing solution, storing them properly and most of all theatrical lenses have 1 yr shelf life. they also sell the scelera contact but these are custom order like they would need the eye curves etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Prescription lenses are manufactured to very high standards requiring inspections to assure those standards are met and those standards also allow your eye to breathe thru the plastic and to not trap and grow bacteria behind the lense for a period of time. They need to be "sized" to your specific eye measurements for a good fit whether or not a corrective prescription is added to the lense. Using a cleaner and sterilizing them will not alter badly fitting lenses.

I have worn contacts before and always wanted to get cat eye lenses when I could afford them. However before buying, my eyes became really dry and I gave up contacts. A few halloweens ago I ended up with a torn retina in one eye and it was a very frightening experience to have your vision suddenly change and become at risk. I had emergency laser eye surgery to repair it but that experience really hit home how much we take our vision for granted. I would never play Russian Roulette with my vision with these non-regulated lenses.
 
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