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Just some of my own two cents here. PVC doesn't do well when being pounded into the ground. What I do is buy some rebar long enough so that I can pound 6 to 8 inches into the ground and have enough sticking up out of the ground to put the PVC over the rebar. Works great and leaves your pvc in decent shape.
 

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Just some of my own two cents here. PVC doesn't do well when being pounded into the ground. What I do is buy some rebar long enough so that I can pound 6 to 8 inches into the ground and have enough sticking up out of the ground to put the PVC over the rebar. Works great and leaves your pvc in decent shape.
I think that's what Mokknoir did; I went back and reread his tutorial and he indicated such.

I'd also add to be careful about in-ground sprinkler system lines! I've plotted mine out where they'll go and will have to offset them a bit from the edge of the sidewalk for that purpose.

I repainted the wood strips after drilling yesterday; because I used furrowing strips (not as good a quality wood) I had more splintering on the backside than I wanted (also drill torque a factor). I'm going to also waterseal them since they'll be in the ground by sprinkler throws for several weeks.
 

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I agree with Papa_K
we also use long pieces of rebar pounded into the lawn then slip the pvc fence sections over it.
We have been doing this for many years now and have never had any breakage of the pvc even in some pretty bad wind storms.
 

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Great tutorial here. If I'm not mistaken I believe I followed this one when making my fence a couple years back. Thought I would post a few pics of my fence as I did adjust the layout of the posts a bit. I thought it gave the fence a little more of an interesting look.

The first two photos were taken during construction. You can see I had set up a jig on my shed wall using some angle brackets screwed into the studs at the spacing I wanted the horizontal rails to be at. Made the construction much easier. Not sure if something like that has already been mentioned earlier in the tutorial.

I added another fence section and a gate last year. Again, I thought the gate broke up the monotony of the identical fence sections and gave it a nice visual.



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rpick89- that is tremendous!! And that's a great idea with the jig--sure would have made my work thus far much easier too. that is some tremendous fencing!

Question for you: the taller cylindrical fence breaks, are those just 3" PVC? What is the other piece added to it atop the tube but below the finial? And did you attach the wood just using standard L joints screwed in? That's a nice effect.
 

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Yes, I have to say that jig has been one of my better ideas. Lord knows I have had plenty of other crappy ones while trying to create props! Those brackets are still up ready for more fencing to be made, and i'll never have to worry about getting the horizontal pieces to match the height on the fence sections already made.

You'll notice though that I made the initial mistake of assembling my first fence section before painting it. As someone else already mentioned it's much easier to paint the pieces first, assemble, then just touch up where needed.

The taller fence posts are 2" PVC, with just a 2" cap, then the finial glued to the cap. And yes, the wood horizontal pieces are attached using a standard angle bracket screwed in, either a 1.5" or 2" bracket, I'm not sure. Because of the slope of my yard, and the fact that the fence layout changes slightly each year I will usually take the end posts off and reinstall each year. That way I can set them at the height that I think looks best at the time I'm reinstalling. For that reason too I don't glue the 2" cap onto the post, so I have some ability to adjust the height of the post finial so it looks best. That make sense?

I also used a different method of attaching the finials to the 1/2" PVC. I used my dremel to cut 3 to 4 3/4" slots in the top of the PVC which allowed me to bend the pipe in just enough to slip on the finial. that process was a little cumbersome and now that I have a heat gun I think that would work better.

Thanks for the compliments.
 

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Yes, I have to say that jig has been one of my better ideas. Lord knows I have had plenty of other crappy ones while trying to create props! Those brackets are still up ready for more fencing to be made, and i'll never have to worry about getting the horizontal pieces to match the height on the fence sections already made.

You'll notice though that I made the initial mistake of assembling my first fence section before painting it. As someone else already mentioned it's much easier to paint the pieces first, assemble, then just touch up where needed.
The jig is a solid idea. Wish I had the space in my garage to rig soemthing like that up for other things too. Agree on the painting, although man, it's a tedious process with spray paint no matter what in my experience.

The taller fence posts are 2" PVC, with just a 2" cap, then the finial glued to the cap. And yes, the wood horizontal pieces are attached using a standard angle bracket screwed in, either a 1.5" or 2" bracket, I'm not sure. Because of the slope of my yard, and the fact that the fence layout changes slightly each year I will usually take the end posts off and reinstall each year. That way I can set them at the height that I think looks best at the time I'm reinstalling. For that reason too I don't glue the 2" cap onto the post, so I have some ability to adjust the height of the post finial so it looks best. That make sense?
Yeah, totally....good call. Nice flexibility there too. Just a standard PVC solid cap component I presume?

I also used a different method of attaching the finials to the 1/2" PVC. I used my dremel to cut 3 to 4 3/4" slots in the top of the PVC which allowed me to bend the pipe in just enough to slip on the finial. that process was a little cumbersome and now that I have a heat gun I think that would work better.

Thanks for the compliments.
My finials just came in the mail today. I had already pre-cut my 1/2" dowel sections and now see that it's probabyl easier to battle through shoehorning the conduit end into the finial than it is to wrap the bejeezus with duct tape out of the dowel to fit into the finial. I don't have a heat gun; although I think my wife has an embossing machine--not sure if it will generate the heat enough to make it pliable to fit inside. But your idea of cutting the top of the pipe is a good improvisation too--nice tip!
 

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The jig is a solid idea. Wish I had the space in my garage to rig soemthing like that up for other things too. Agree on the painting, although man, it's a tedious process with spray paint no matter what in my experience.
Agreed!

Yeah, totally....good call. Nice flexibility there too. Just a standard PVC solid cap component I presume?

Yes

My finials just came in the mail today. I had already pre-cut my 1/2" dowel sections and now see that it's probabyl easier to battle through shoehorning the conduit end into the finial than it is to wrap the bejeezus with duct tape out of the dowel to fit into the finial. I don't have a heat gun; although I think my wife has an embossing machine--not sure if it will generate the heat enough to make it pliable to fit inside. But your idea of cutting the top of the pipe is a good improvisation too--nice tip!
Yeah, I'm not sure if the embossing machine would work either. If you use a dremel-type tool to cut it will make quite the mess. I highly recommend a mask and goggles. If you don't have a dremel a pvc hack saw would work, just two cuts to make an "x". I also used a vise to hold the PVC pipe in place, much easier that way. When you go to put the finial onto the PVC you'll see it is a very tight fit. What I did was wedge the finial onto the pipe just a little, then made sure it was straight, then held it upside down and while holding the pipe gently, but firmly, tapped the finial onto the floor to drive it home. Keep the pipe as plumb as possible. If you slam it too hard, or at a slight angle you risk snapping the collar of the finial, and/or one of the PVC tabs created by the cuts. You'll see what I mean and get the hang of it pretty quick. As I said, it is a tight fit, and you will bow the square collar of the finial, but it doesn't look bad at all, and it should be pretty darn tight. Good luck regardless what method you use!
 

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A few notes - I made about 80 linear feet of this last year, so I had it down to an assembly-line science. Definitely cut the conduit and drill the holes BEFORE spray painting. The black paint will slop over into the holes. It won't be 100% solid, but enough to cover the areas not covered by the pipe.

If using conduit, 3/4" finials DO fit over w/o any heat/dowling required. I tested a few before I bought big. I used a standard pipe cutter to cut the conduit, so different tools may get different results. Since I used conduit, I went with cast iron finials. The price was .27 per unit from Kings. The advantages of cast iron: strength, ability to rust over time giving a weathered look, and a simple epoxy to hold them in place. Less hassle and I don't have to worry about them breaking.

Speaking of holding in place, I made the conduit equal lengths. Home Depot sells cut lengths of rebar - a few 1 foot sections keep the fence in place, and ORANGE cable ties let vandals know there's no way they're getting into my graveyard, save as a permanent resident. I also water the ground a bit for the fog machines and it softens it up enough to jam the conduit itself into the ground. That gives me the ability to use green fire effects and the soaked toilet paper roll trick for some great pumpkin effects safely.

For the holes, a 3/4" bit was large enough to slide the conduit into the furring strips. Since it was conduit, I had to use pilot holes. Broke a bit or two before I got the knack, but they're still cheaper per unit than the iron fencing from Lowes and Menards. That is nice stuff, but these look far better and can keep unwanteds outside.

I really do recommend conduit over PVC. I don't know the cost differential, but once made, you never have to worry about it again.
 

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I've finished all of my prep work at this point. I affixed the finials onto the conduit for all sections (60 individual 3' long pieces and 20 2' ones that I'm going to run the 'foam chains' along as a side driveway border) and must say that my wife's embossing gun worked just fine to soften up the conduit and then shoehorn the finials on securely.

it worked like a champ--once you get in the groove, it's pretty quick work too, for the most part.

I also used 2- 2" sections of PVC as dividers between each individual section and then, my last fence-related project, is to make columns from 4' tall 8" diameter cement tubes, topped off with foam (to be monster-mudded and painted).

The attached crude diagram shows one half of the entire asembly as I'm envisioning; the mirror opposite to then exist on the other side of the walkway. I plan on using standard L brackets to join the component sections together and fit the complex atop rebar sections in the ground.

Getting closer! Pics of the finished product to come!
 

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Love the tutorial, we took it one step futher. :D
Here is our fence, my husband and I are building this year. This was a template just to show how it looks complete so the poles aren't lined up yet. There will be 38 sections made each of about 3' by 3'.

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The finials were purchased at Fencesupplyinc.com . Nice range, we bought the 1/2" Triad point ones at 25c each
 

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I've seen the circle pieces done before, it looks so much more professional that way. Are you screwing them in place, or just using PVC cement?

One thing I've worried about, is these finials being pointy and hard. Poking an eye out is the last thing I want. So I'm planning to cut a bunch of arrow heads from 3/8" thick rubber, and hot gluing them in place. Will post results.
 

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We are screwing the circles in, and then using my lovely Dremel to file any screws that could cause issues. Finishing it up this weekend so I should be able to post a finished photo, they do look awesome in person though :)
 

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Here comes one of Bryan's terrible ideas.... ready?



Cut two circles off, cut the circles in half, then heat up one circle to flatten it. Glue its ends to the ends of the half circles, to make an S like you see on fencing. Or perhaps cut a PVC pipe lengthwise for long strips, to really forge some wild designs!


 
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