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....

You can also order the finials with a 3/4" base, but I'm not sure if that would fit over the conduit properly in order to eliminate the dowel approach. Perhaps someone else can chime in on the 3/4" base for us. Myself, I'm glad I did it in a way that allows me to remove the finials if I wish without doing any damage.... (think creative changes possible, but you'll see what I have in mind next HW).

In retrospect, the dowel size could be cut in half to about 3". That would equal about an inch inside the finial base and the rest in the conduit. The final thing I would change is not using a hole saw, but an actual 3/4" drill bit, since that would be much faster (I used what I had already on hand).
I used 3/4" finials which are a tad bit small. I had to use a drill press and vice to open up them slighty to fit (I forget what drill bit size). I've heard of others using heat gun to make them (or the PVC) more pliable. Great idea with the dowels!



TIP: I found that I wasted a LOT less spray paint if I painted the pieces before I assembled the fence.
 

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where did you get your finials may i ask? i made a fence like this a loooong time ago, about 10 years ago. at the time for finals i used that black foam you get in sheets and just cut out a shape. it worked good. But unfortunately my fence was destroyed in hurricane ivan and i havent remade one. i think I might try that again this year,
 

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King Metals

I also used King Architectural metals for my finials. I bought the 3/4" plastic ones and used a heat gun to make the end of the pvc pliable. I was then able to just work the finial onto the end of the pipe. Once it cooled and hardened, they seemed to kind of lock together.

Also, the prices on the King web pages are for 1 piece. You get discounts for bulk orders. I think the ones I bought were listed at 22 cents and I ordered 120 and they went down to 16 cents each.
 

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Discussion Starter #32 (Edited)
Update 2010

I made several more sections of fence this year, so I have a few tips from the second go round.

- First of all, I took MonkeyBasic's advice and painted everything before I started to create the fence. This made everything MUCH easier to paint once assembled. All I had to do was come back and do some quick touch up to the spots that got scratched or scuffed.



After a first coat on the cross bars (1x2s), I started spraying the conduit, which I quickly learned to hold over the cross bars while painting to add the over-spray to the cross bars. I started with the conduit flat and sprayed a side, then rolled it over and did the other side, then finished off holding it over the cross bars and starting on one end working my way up.

- Second, I stuck with my dowel application for the finials (which fit 1/2"). This time I put two wraps of duck tape on the end going into the conduit. For the finial end, I just did two wraps of 1" masking tape which was sufficient to hold on the finials. My dowels were about 6" long, which you don't want them too much longer or they will hit the screw going through the conduit at the cross bar.

- Third, this year I abandoned the hole saw, and went with a 7/8" drill bit. This is pretty much perfect for the conduit to slip through and was MUCH, MUCH faster than the hole saw method.

- Fourth, when you are putting the screws through the cross bar and conduit, DON'T sink the screw since it will poke out the other side creating a sharp point that could come back to haunt you in a bad way (think kid's eyes, fingers, etc). I found that if I just made the screw head flush, there was only a very small point sticking through the other side which was easily covered by just the paint.

- Fifth, my conduit sections are all 3', with the exception of the two end pieces which I left longer (the extra foot from the 10' length, along with the end that has the flair to make it easier to slip over the rebar. I positioned the conduit so it was stick 6" above the top cross bar, and 4" below the bottom cross bar.

- Finally, if you want to know the amounts of materials for an 8' section: (2) 1x2x8 for the cross bars. (5) 1/2" electrical conduit - 10' sections, (30) #6 1-1/2 wood screws (flat head), (2) cans of cheap black spray paint (get the .97 cent cans at Lowe's, etc., and of course, (15) plastic finials


So, that's it. Good luck on your fencing. :)
 

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I made a cemetery fence this year for our haunt. I wanted to follow this method, but I was out-voted! We used 1x2 wood strapping and 1/2' PVC. I cut the PVC into 36" sections. I laid out the wood strapping and screwed the PVC every 12", leaving 4" from the bottom cross piece. We drove stakes into the ground and secured the fence to the stakes. Granted we made ours appear old and dilapidated. We screwed the PVC at angles. We weren't worried about whether the measurements were correctly.

I want to go back this year and add some more PVC at the 6" mark. I either want to purchase the finials or the PVC caps. This year I am going to go back and lightly dust my fence with green spray paint and drape it with moss.

 

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Love it!

I'm so excited to make fencing for our graveyard this year! I ordered my finials from Kings last night and I can't wait for them to get here. Thank you for this detailed tutorial - I will be sure to post pictures when completed.
 

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I ordered my finials from Kings last night and I can't wait for them to get here. Thank you for this detailed tutorial - I will be sure to post pictures when completed.
Finials arrived and I'm beyond impressed. Very high quality for such a low price! I ordered the 4.5" "black pointed triad" design made for a 3/4" base.
 

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Finials arrived and I'm beyond impressed. Very high quality for such a low price! I ordered the 4.5" "black pointed triad" design made for a 3/4" base.
Awesome to hear! Those are what I'm going to order!

I started on mine today. This Public Service Announcement is brought to you by the sweltering Houston heat:

I laid out my gray conduit, the 1"x2"x8' furring strips (I opted for these over the treated pine given the application and that the strips I bought were 98 cents ea VS $1.97 ea for the other).

Started spraying and I can definitely validate what MokkNoir said about going through a LOT of paint! I've burned 3 cans so far and have most of the conduit done but barely half the 4 8' wood pieces.

Also, I laid mine perpendicular across the wood to spray and when I came back to turn them after the first application, the heat had warped them! So the second coat was a pain in the ass. I took them and laid them on a tarp in the driveway to reshape and let them flatten out, but just an FYI to everyone who does this while we still have summer heat. :)
 
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