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Halloween Bad Girl
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Discussion Starter #1
I started building my cemetery columns, and have come to a stand still. So I have to ask for your help and advice..

I pieced the pink styrofoam together, and now have rough edges and whole to fill. What would be the best material to fill these seams?









I ran out of styrofoam, so today I have to go back and purchase some more. To cover the top and bottom.

I was all gung ho starting this project, now I am in a blah mood, because it isn't LOOKING like how I want it to.. It is raining today, hopefully I can work on it, later this afternoon.

I'll keep this thread updated with my progress.
 

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without being able to see the actual columns as i am at work and pretty much every pic is banned here, depending on the size of the holes you could go with drywall mud and tape. It is cheap, easy to apply and sandable to shape it as you see fit. You can also "sand" it with a large wet sponge to remove any excess before it completely dry...or even after, it will just take a little longer.

hope it helped

-DAN
 

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I think you are off to a good start! Since you are painting these, you can get away with using drywall mud to fill in the cracks. When you paint your mortar lines, be sure to offset the joints between the stone blocks. Another easy way to hide seams would be to "stucco" the columns. Make a thick mixture of monster mud and apply that. Use the trowel to press against the surface and pull up the mud into little peaks. Let set for a few minutes then smooth out again, but be sure to leave the stucco texture.

Worst case, if you are really not happy with the results, don't forget that paint and darkness are the haunters friend! TOT's and party guests will not complain that they can see a foam joint or something that is not perfect. I really do think you are off to a great start!

Eric
 

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I think the drywall or paper mache either should do it. I know how you feel about getting out of the mood when something doesn't go well. But Keep at it. Sometimes they turn out better then you planned in the end. Besides you can use a hole to add to the projects distress as my husband would say.
 

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The Hobo Spider Assassin
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Princess, I would fill with Joint Compound (Bondex), however I'm not sure of what your overall surface plan is for the columns. Knowing the direction that you are headed and the look you wish to apply would help me to provide better advice.
 

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Hauntless
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I just did this to make plywood look like steel. In other words, I needed to completely transform a surface. Take monster mud and trowel it on. It will give it a Venetian plaster surface and completely transform the faults you are having now. If one coat isn't enough, do two. Will work like a charm!
 

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Mill Creek Haunted Hollow
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I just did this make plywood look like steel. In other words, I needed to completely transform a surface. Take monster mud and trowel it on. It will give it a Venetian plaster surface and completely transform the faults you are having now. If one coat isn't enough, do two. Will work like a charm!
Terra, I haven't worked with MM yet, but is there a concern that it may flex and crack on a smooth surface like a column side?
 

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Years ago everyone always said to fill in with wood putty and it could be sanded. I have used caulk too.
 

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Hauntless
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Terra, I haven't worked with MM yet, but is there a concern that it may flex and crack on a smooth surface like a column side?
The more I think about it, that could be a problem. I haven't tried this technique on a smooth foam surface. Perhaps if you rough up the foam it will stick better. The latex paint in the mm should help with flexibility. Plus, one or two coats of paint or Drylok should help.

Oh, another idea. You could take muslin or another cheap fabric (cheesecloth?) and dip that into the mm and then put that over the columns and smooth it out. The fabric would act a support mechanism. That could help too.

I got a gallon of Sculpt or Coat (watch it though....expensive) and it's primarily used to make set pieces (walls, roofs, floors) by coating surfaces with it alone or doing the dipped-muslin thing. Flexibility is important for theater sets because they are moved around all the time and need to be light. Sculpt or Coat has the consistency of whipped butter...just like mm. So, that got me thinking of using mm in place of the expensive Sculpt or Coat.
 

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Halloween Bad Girl
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Discussion Starter #11




In the last project I did You can see the seams, and then where I filled it in with wood putty. I have to say that once the putty dries hard it is nearly impossible to sand or in my case to dremel over.



In this picture, I ended up having to use Moss to cover the edges, because they were just to much to try to fill.

I also went over the whole tombstone with MM. It did work into a lot of the cracks and removed the imperfections. It held onto the sides very well.
 

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Halloween Bad Girl
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Discussion Starter #12
I believe what I am going to end up doing is using the wood putty in the deeper cracks and then MM over the entire surface, just to cover any imperfections.

Last night I sat down and started dremeling my exposed bricks. They turned out really nice, at 10 pm I gave up and crawled into bed, forgetting to take some photos...
 

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Dead and loving it.
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Honestly, until you mentioned the wood filler problem, I didn't see anything wrong with the tombstone. I thought it looked great. My experience with wood filler is that it can be sanded down. I used a palm sander. The monster mud on the columns is going to look nice. I did that with mine and it turned out really good.

I can't wait to see more pics.
 

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Do NOT use joint compound (Monster Mud) or spakeling.
It will never be completely sealed and will get wet when it rains.

What I did last year was use a mixture of sand and latex paint. If you add enough sand, you can get a pastey mixture that you can fill the joints with. Plus, the sand adds a realistic look of stone.
:).
 

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Do NOT use joint compound (Monster Mud) or spakeling.
It will never be completely sealed and will get wet when it rains.

What I did last year was use a mixture of sand and latex paint. If you add enough sand, you can get a pastey mixture that you can fill the joints with. Plus, the sand adds a realistic look of stone.
:).

dryloc or exterior latex paint will solve the issue of not sealing, a mistake I made one year and my wifey hasnt let me live it down since.

I also agree on the tombstone, looks aged and weathered very well, and the moss definately adds a "ive been here forever" touch. Well done!!

-DK
 
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